Unraveling Food Industry Lies – Your chicken Is Full of Liquid Fillers and Chemicals

Those juicy, delicious chicken breasts in the meat case at your local supermarket are more than likely hiding a dirty little secret that might make you think twice about ever eating them again. Most people are unaware of it, but conventional chicken meat typically contains a whole lot more than just chicken, as it is often “plumped” up with brine (salt water), chicken stock, flavor and texture-enhancing chemicals, and even the waste byproducts of other animals that can constitute as much as 30 percent of the meat’s total weight.

Rather than produce Continue reading

Can You Taste the Iron in Your Water?

A new study says that, as people age, they may lose the ability to detect the taste of iron in drinking water. This piece of startling health news raises the concern that older adults could be at risk of over-exposure to iron.

Researchers point out that tasting the metallic flavor in water can help people limit exposure to metals such as iron. This trace element, required by the body to transport oxygen in red blood cells, is found naturally in water or from the corrosion of iron water-supply pipes. However, doctors’ advice to all patients is that you need less iron after the age of 50.

That metallic flavor in water, caused by the dissolved iron and copper commonly found in groundwater or that may leak into tap water from corroded pipes, has been an issue for both consumers and utility companies.

More than two million miles of the United States’ water and wastewater pipes are nearing the end of their useful life. But, these facilities, which are generally underground, don’t attract too much attention. This study is highlighting the fact that attention may be necessary. Continue reading

Natural Selective Breeding Works Better than GMOs

Twenty years of careful research and development on a new apple variety has produced an amazing fruit that New Zealand’s Scoop news states is “sweet, tangy and delicious.” And the most amazing aspect of Swiss orchardist and researcher Markus Kobelt’s new RedLove apple variety is that it was designed to be resistant to disease, appealing to the palate, and easy to grow — and all without the use of any sort of artificial genetic modification.

For many years, researchers from other organizations have been working on creating a genetically modified (GM) apple variety that would be higher in nutrients, more resistant to disease and pests, and appealing to growers and consumers. But Kobelt beat them to the punch  Continue reading

FDA Going after Makers of Antibacterial Hand Sanitizers

Most people know that bacteria are picked up and transmitted by the hands, and so it seems logical that to protect ourselves, we can use antibacterial hand sanitizers. Logical but wrong. The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) is now going after makers of hand sanitizers for making claims that their products will protect against MRSA and other diseases. Of the sanitizers, the FDA says, “Some hand sanitizers and antiseptic products come with claims that they can prevent MRSA infections. Don’t believe them.” Such claims have not been proven, according to the FDA, and the manufacturers have been warned to cease making such statements.

The bacterium MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) can cause serious illness,  Continue reading

How an Epidemic of Dead Bats Could Make Your Groceries More Expensive

It’s bad enough that the U.S. honeybee population has dropped precipitously in the past few years, threatening the existence of all pollinated crops (that’s one-third of American agriculture). Now an epidemic may be hitting the country’s bats–and it has the potential to further threaten agriculture.

Bats are the unsung heroes of organic farming, consuming massive amounts of pests on a daily basis. The little brown bat, Montana’s most common bat species, gobbles up 1,200 insects per hour and in one 2006 study, bats in South-Central Texas were shown to have an annual pest control value of over $740,000 (29% of the value of the area’s cotton crop). For organic farms, this is key, since pest control is hard enough with chemicals. Continue reading

Majority of Patients Want Online Access to Doctors

Nearly three-quarters of people want to be able to get lab results, request appointments, pay medical bills, and communicate with their doctor’s office through secure portals, finds Intuit Health study.

These findings come from Intuit Health’s second-annual Health Care Check-Up Survey,  Continue reading

Salt Is a Four-Letter Word

The average U.S. adult eats about 1.5 teaspoons of salt a day, more than twice the recommended amount, a U.S. professor of clinical nutrition says.

Dr. Jo Ann Carson of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas says federal regulators have begun urging food manufacturers to cut back on the amount of sodium they add to everything from breakfast cereals to soups.

The aim is for manufacturers to reduce the amount so gradually consumers would barely notice the lower sodium levels, but the final limits have not yet been determined.

“Lowering our salt intake is important to control blood pressure,” Carson says in a statement. African-Americans, the elderly and those with diabetes are recommended to lower their salt intake because they are most often salt sensitive.

For the some 50 million Americans with high blood pressure, research finds the lower the sodium, the lower the blood pressure.

To lower salt intake: Eat fewer processed foods such as frozen dinners, packaged mixes and canned soups; replace salt with herbs, spices, lemon, lime, garlic and vinegar; replace salty snacks with unsalted pretzels or nuts mixed with raisins, graham crackers, low-fat or fat-free yogurt, plain popcorn and raw vegetables; and buy unsalted or low-salt varieties of foods and condiments.