9 Home Remedies To Relieve Urinary Tract Infection

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a very common health problem. While both men and women get UTIs, women are more prone to them. However, urinary tract infections can also lead to kidney infections and other complications if the bacteria spread to the kidneys or bloodstream. Continue reading

Curry Dilates Arteries With One Serving

Did you know that a single culinary serving of spices in the form of curry can dilate your arteries, preventing the cardiovascular harms associated with eating common foods? Continue reading

11 Herbs Used As Traditional Acne Remedies

Acne involves the over-production of sebum from the sebaceous glands which results in the blockage of the pores with a sticky mass of the dead cells and oil. This creates a breeding ground for the opportunistic overgrowth of bacteria normally present in the skin. These convert the mass into compounds that cause inflammation and unattractive raised surfaces. Skin irritation may also result Continue reading

Alternative Remedy for Treating Helicobacter

“Helicobacter” is a common bacterium that causes infection in the stomach. The bacteria can cause ulcers to form and even lead to cancer. Treatment usually involves a course of two different antibiotics. Not everyone responds to treatment, however. It is  good health news, then, that researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have found that green tea could be a strong alternative remedy in the fight against Helicobacter.

For the study, a research team assessed the “bactericidal” (bacteria-killing) effect of green tea against Helicobacter. They also evaluated the effects of green tea on the development of Helicobacter-induced gastritis in an animal model. According to the research team, the study data clearly demonstrated Continue reading

Coriander-This Spice Could Help Slash Harmful Cholesterol

Coriander is an herb often used in Indian food. It is almost guaranteed to be included in any curry dish. Coriander is also used quite frequently in Thai cooking. It has a delicious taste that is quite distinct and unique. What an added bonus that this tasty herb is also very good for you! Researchers have determined that coriander could help lower blood glucose and LDL cholesterol levels.

A recent clinical trial set out to investigate the potential hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activity of coriander seed. In the animal study, coriander extract was given to both obese rats with elevated blood glucose and cholesterol levels and normal rats. The researchers found that the coriander extract suppressed hyperglycemia in the obese rats and helped to lower LDL cholesterol levels. They concluded that coriander seed extract in obese rats normalized glycemia Continue reading

Use Tissue Salts to Reduce Acidity Naturally

Foods are of two types, acid or alkaline. If too many acidic foods are consumed, the body’s Ph becomes unbalanced and one will feel unhealthy and sick. Over-sugared junk food is highly acidic, as are meats such as pork and beef. Nat. Phos. (tissue salt no. 10) is an acid neutralizer and acid/alkaline balancer. It reduces acid in the whole body and keeps the digestive system healthy.

Sour reflux, heartburn attacks, stomach ulcers and digestive problems indicate that Nat. Phos is badly deficient. For frequent cases of indigestion, keep a bottle of this tissue salt on hand. Take 2 tablets prior to eating and dissolve 2 tablets under the tongue after a meal in order to help the body clean itself of acid build up.

Nat. Phos fights excess acidity,  Continue reading

Ancient Egyptian Herbal Medicine.

Herbs played a major part in Egyptian medicine. The plant medicines mentioned in the Ebers papyrus for instance include opium, cannabis, myrrh, frankincense, fennel, cassia, senna, thyme, henna, juniper, aloe, linseed and castor oil – though some of the translations are less than certain. Cloves of garlic have been found in Egyptian burial sites, including the tomb of Tutankhamen and in the sacred underground temple of the bulls at Saqqara. Many herbs were steeped in wine, which was then drunk as an oral medicine. Egyptians thought garlic and onions aided endurance, and consumed large quantities of them. Raw garlic was routinely given to asthmatics and to those suffering with bronchial-pulmonary complaints. Onions helped against problems of the digestive system.

Garlic was an important healing agent then just as it still is to the modern Egyptian and to most of the peoples in the Mediterranean area: Fresh cloves are peeled, mashed and macerated in a mixture of vinegar and water. This can be used to gargle and rinse the mouth, or taken internally to treat sore throats and toothache. Another way to take garlic both for prevention as well as treatment is to macerate several cloves of mashed garlic in olive oil. Applied as an external liniment or taken internally it is beneficial for bronchial and lung complaints including colds. A freshly peeled clove of raw garlic wrapped in muslin or cheesecloth and pinned to the undergarment is hoped to protect against infectious diseases such as colds and influenza.

Coriander, C. Sativum was considered to have cooling, stimulant, carminative and digestive properties. Both the seeds and the plant were used as a spice in cooking to prevent and eliminate flatulence, they were also taken as a tea for stomach and all kinds of urinary complaints including cystitis. Coriander leaves were commonly added fresh to spicy foods to moderate their irritating effects. It was one of the herbs offered to the gods by the king, and seeds were found in the tomb of Tutankhamen and in other ancient burial sites.

Cumin, Cumin cyminum is an umbelliferous herb indigenous to Egypt. The seeds were considered to be a stimulant and effective against flatulence. They were often used together with coriander for flavoring. Cumin powder mixed with some wheat flour as a binder and a little water was applied to relieve the pain of any aching or arthritic joints. Powdered cumin mixed with grease or lard was inserted as an anal suppository to disperse heat from the anus and stop itching.

Leaves from many plants, such as willow, sycamore, acaci or the ym-tree, were used in poultices and the like. Tannic Acid derived from acacia seeds commonly helped for cooling the vessels and heal burns. Castor oil, figs  and dates, were used as laxatives.
Tape worms, the snakes in the belly, were dealt with by an infusion of pomegranate root in water, which was strained and drunk. The alkaloids contained in it paralyzed the worms’ nervous system, and they relinquished their hold. Ulcers were treated with yeast, as were stomach ailments.

Some of the medicines were made from plant materials imported from abroad. Mandrake, introduced from Canaan and grown locally since the New Kingdom, was thought to be an aphrodisiac and, mixed with alcohol, induced unconsciousness. Cedar oil, an antiseptic, originated in the Levant. The Persian henna was grown in Egypt since the Middle Kingdom, and – if identical with henu mentioned in the Ebers Papyrus – was used against hair loss. They treated catarrh with aloe which came from eastern Africa. Frankincense , containing tetrahydrocannabinol and used like hashish as pain killer.

Minerals and animal products were used too. Honey and grease formed part of many wound treatments,  mother’s milk was occasionally given against viral diseases like the common cold, fresh meat laid on open wounds and sprains, and animal dung was thought to be effective at times. At the Cairo Museum bears the legend: “Eye lotion to be dispersed, good for eyesight.” An Egyptian papyrus from 1500 BCE discusses recipes for treating conjunctivitis and cornea, iris, and eyelid problems. Lead-based chemicals like carbonates and acetates were popular for their therapeutic properties .

Malachite used as an eye-liner also had therapeutic value. In a country where eye infections were endemic, the effects of its germicidal qualities were appreciated even if the reasons for its effectiveness were not understood.