Researchers use “ocean elevators” to grow giant sea kelp – a promising source of biofuel

Researchers made a makeshift “elevator” in the ocean to grow giant kelp, the world’s biggest species of marine algae and a promising source of biofuel. The researchers explained that giant kelp needs to be moved up and down the ocean column every day to thrive. Continue reading

Plants can sense, think and communicate, says Italian scientist

Talking to plants is neither an uncommon habit among gardeners and plant enthusiasts, nor is it a modern notion. Strange as it might sound or appear to an onlooker, people talk to their plants for a host of reasons. Some do it as a form of social interaction. Others might talk to their ailing plants to nurse them back to life. Continue reading

Amazing aquatic life: Blue-banded sea snakes “breathe” through their heads

Sea snakes, despite their name, still need to surface to get air to breathe. Australian researchers, however, have found one species that has developed an organ that lets it effectively “breathe” underwater for a limited time. Continue reading

Naturally occurring molecule shows potential to treat patients with Parkinson’s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4x2bVLw9VgU

According to the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) published in 2019, neurodegenerative diseases, which affect the structure and function of the central nervous system (CNS), are the largest cause of disability globally. Parkinson’s disease, the most common of these diseases next to Alzheimer’s, is a progressive movement disorder that remains without a cure.

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People with mild symptoms can develop immunity against coronavirus, says research

French researchers have found that even mild cases of the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) can produce antibodies in almost all patients. In addition, they reveal that the patient’s defenses against the virus increase as he starts recovery.

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New Map of Protein Interactions in Model Plant May Help Scientists Improve Plant Species Used in Agriculture and Pharmaceuticals

An international consortium of scientists has produced the first systematic network map of interactions that occur between proteins in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. (Arabidopsis is a mustard plant that has 27,000 proteins and serves as a popular model organism for biological studies of plants, analogous to lab rats that serve as popular model organisms for biological studies of animals.)

Known as an “interactome,” the new Arabidopsis network map defines 6,205 protein-to-protein Arabidopsis interactions involving 2,774 individual proteins. By itself, this map doubles the volume of data on protein interactions  Continue reading