Vegetative Patient Scott Routley Says ‘I’m Not in Pain’

painA Canadian man who was believed to have been in a vegetative state for more than a decade, has been able to tell scientists that he is not in any pain.

It’s the first time an uncommunicative, severely brain-injured patient has been able to Continue reading

New Study Discovers Harmful “Age Spots” on the Brain

Here is some important health news out of the world- famous Mayo Clinic. Researchers say a common condition of the brain believed to be a harmless part of aging could really be a disease that changes an older adult’s brain function. Its name: “leukoaraiosis.”

This mouthful means that the brain has tiny spots that look like white dots Continue reading

Latest Discovery Could Help Lower Your Blood Pressure

Have you heard anything about cocoa husks? They’re a by- product of the chocolate industry that researchers have discovered to be rich in soluble and insoluble fiber. In fact, when cocoa husks first appeared in nutritional trials, they were marketed as a weight-loss tool. But now, researchers are finding that this functional food is capable of a whole lot more when it comes to health benefits.

Researchers at Continue reading

Hardening of the Arteries Link Discovered

Research tells us that environmental toxins are probably not good for us. Unfortunately, this does not stop the widespread use of chemicals such as pesticides and PCBs. There is very little positive press about toxins used in the manufacturing and agricultural industries when it comes to human health. Now researchers are dealing toxins yet another blow: in the latest health news out of Uppsala University in Sweden, environmental toxins may be linked to atherosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis is a hardening of the arteries that often leads to cardiovascular disease. Heart disease is the number one cause of death in industrialized countries.

The Swedish researchers measured levels of environmental toxins in the blood of about 100 Swedes. These study participants were also assessed for hardening of the arteries.

The research team found a strong connection Continue reading

‘Game-Changer’ in Evolution from S. African Bones

Two million-year-old bones belonging to a creature with both apelike and human traits provide the clearest evidence of evolution’s first major step toward modern humans — findings some are calling a potential game-changer.

An analysis of the bones found in South Africa suggests Australopithecus sediba is the most likely candidate to be the ancestor of humans, said lead researcher Lee R. Berger of the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa.

The fossils, belonging to a male child and an adult female, show a novel combination of features, almost as though nature were experimenting. Some resemble pre-human creatures while others suggest the genus Homo, which includes Homo sapiens, modern people.

“It’s as if evolution is caught in one vital moment, a stop-action snapshot of evolution in action,” said Richard Potts, director of the human origins program at the Smithsonian Institution. He was not among the team, led by South African scientists, whose research was published online Thursday in the journal Science. Continue reading

Researchers Find Disease-Causing Fat Cells

UC Davis Health System researchers have discovered biological indicators that help explain why some obese people develop chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and others do not.
The researchers took a novel approach of looking specifically at the body fat of people with metabolic syndrome — a condition characterized by increased blood pressure, high-fasting blood-sugar levels, excess abdominal fat and abnormal cholesterol levels. They found the fat cells released biomarkers associated with insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, conditions often leading to diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

“Our study shows that not all obesity is the same and some body fat may actually be toxic,” Continue reading

Vanderbilt Researchers, International Team, Uncover Genes Linked to Multiple Sclerosis

Research doubles number of genes associated with the disease

An international team of scientists has identified 29 new genetic variants linked to multiple sclerosis, providing key insights into the biology of an important and very debilitating neurological disease.

Multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common neurological conditions among young adults, affects around 2.5 million individuals worldwide. It is a chronic disease that attacks the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves, and can cause severe symptoms such as paralysis or loss of vision.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Center for Human Genetics Research (CHGR) played an important role Continue reading

New Discovery Can Keep Beer Stay Fresh Longer

Researchers are reporting discovery of a scientific basis for extending the shelf life of beer so that it stays fresh and tastes good longer. For the first time, they identified the main substances that cause the bitter, harsh aftertaste of aged beer and suggest that preventing the formation of these substances could help extend its freshness. Their findings appear in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Thomas Hofmann and colleagues point out that beer can develop an unpleasant, bitter aftertaste as it ages. Unlike wine, scotch whiskey, and bourbon, beer tastes best when consumed fresh. Experts estimate that the average beer goes bad after 6 to 12 months of storage. Scientists have identified several dozens of the key bitter-tasting substances formed during beer manufacturing – mostly so-called “prenylated polyketides” derived from hops. Until now, however, nobody had solid information about the bitter substances that form as beer ages.

The scientists analyzed a variety of commercial beers both before and after storage. They identified 56 substances that contribute to beer’s bitter taste, including five that appear  Continue reading