Testosterone Therapy May Actually Increase Your Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack and Death

Story at-a-glance

After age 30, a man’s testosterone levels begin to decline and continue to do so as he ages, leading to symptoms such as decreased sex drive, erectile dysfunction, depressed mood, and difficulties with concentration and memory

Conventional treatment for Continue reading

More Younger Women Getting Breast Cancer

Revealing new data from the charity Cancer Research UK reports that a record number of women under the age of 50 are being diagnosed with breast cancer.

For the first time, more than 10,000 women under 50 were diagnosed with the disease in Continue reading

Muscle Preservation

Andreas was a world-class bodybuilder who, by all appearances, was in the best shape of his life. His body was teeming with muscles and there was hardly an ounce of fat on him — he made the Incredible Hulk look like a beanpole.

And at 31 years of age, he did something that no 31-year-old should ever do — he died suddenly.

Years of bodybuilding supplements meant to enhance his performance and appearance had laid waste to his body. Continue reading

Common Metal Could Make Breast Cancer Worse

Here is a health alert out of California, where researchers have tied a very common metal to breast cancer. They found that cadmium, a heavy metal found in cosmetics, food, water and air, makes breast cancer cells more aggressive.

This would seem to have a big impact on cancer treatment for all patients. The research shows that exposure to cadmium for prolonged periods of time can cause the progression of breast cancer to become more aggressive. Continue reading

First Study Investigating Possible Link between Sunscreen Ingredient and Endometriosis

Scientists are reporting a possible link between the use of sunscreen containing a certain ingredient that mimics the effects of the female sex hormone estrogen and an increased risk of being diagnosed with endometriosis, a painful condition in which uterine tissue grows outside the uterus. They describe the report, published in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology, as the first to examine whether such a connection may exist.

Kurunthachalam Kannan and colleagues explain that some sunscreens and other personal care products contain benzophenone Continue reading

Harvard Study: Pasteurized Milk from Industrial Dairies Linked to Cancer

The truth has once again shaken the foundation of the ‘American Tower of Babel’ that is mainstream science, with a new study out of Harvard University showing that pasteurized milk product from factory farms is linked to causing hormone-dependent cancers. It turns out that the concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) model of raising cows on factory farms churns out milk with dangerously high levels of estrone sulfate, an estrogen compound linked to testicular, prostate, and breast cancers.

Dr. Ganmaa Davaasambuu, Ph.D., and her colleagues specifically identified “milk from modern dairy farms” as the culprit, referring to large-scale confinement operations where cows are milked 300 days of the year, including while they are pregnant. Compared to raw milk from her native Mongolia, which is extracted Continue reading

Using Hormones? What You Need to Know

More and more people are using bio-identical hormone therapy. Though this therapy conveys a wide range of benefits, it can also pose the risk of undesirable side effects. But you can make this therapy safer and more effective with an individualized approach: Understand how your body metabolizes hormones and boost their benefits with the right diet, lifestyle and supplements.

Hormonal Help

As you age, your hormonal profile changes. For instance, menopause depletes the essential female hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. Research in Europe has demonstrated Continue reading

BPA May Cause Arrhythmia, Heart Attacks in Women

Bisphenol A overrides the natural heartbeat signal causing female heart cells to misfire, according to a recent study. Given how pervasive BPA is these days, this could mean heart problems, possibly even fatal ones, for millions of women.

BPA is everywhere

BPA is ubiquitous in the industrial world: in clear plastic containers, in the epoxy lining of canned foods, in dental sealants, and even coating many store receipts. Studies in the past five years have shown that nearly everyone living in the industrial world encounters at least trace amounts of this compound.

Yet industries using plastics for packaging, as well as some mainstream medical experts, have long assured the public that small concentrations of BPA do not pose a serious health hazard. FDA efforts Continue reading

Mangosteen Benefits May Become a Revolutionary Natural Health Option For Many Illnesses

Some of the most powerful antioxidants in the world might come from the rind of a tropical fruit called mangosteen—with its benefits and extraordinary potential against ailments ranging from infection …to cancer…to mental health issues?

Despite the similarities in name, the mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) is not related to the mango. Once you discover the extent of the mangosteen’s curative and preventative powers, you’ll never confuse the two again!

The mangosteen is a dark purple fruit that thrives in the hot, humid climates of Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, and Indonesia. The flesh of the mangosteen has a sweet, tangy flavor, but it’s the hard pericarp—or rind, Continue reading

Plant Compound Could Help You Survive Breast Cancer

Who said there were no herbal cures for breast cancer? A new study has found that phytoestrogens, plant compounds, may have a cancer protective effect. The ones in question here are “lignans” and the target is breast cancer. The answer: it just might help you survive the disease.

Phytoestrogens mimic the actions of estrogen in the body and have been linked to many health benefits. The most important type of phytoestrogens in our diet is lignan. Lignans come in seeds (especially flaxseeds), as well as in wheat and vegetables. The body turns these lignans into another lignan, enterolactone, which is then absorbed.

From 2002 to 2005, researchers took blood samples from 1,140 women who had been diagnosed with postmenopausal breast cancer. After six years, they compared levels of enterolactone with how the disease was progressing.

They found that women with the highest blood levels of enterolactone had a 40% lower risk of death than those with the lowest levels. That is pretty huge. And the news extended for those women Continue reading

How and Why Melatonin Is an Effective Cancer Treatment

Numerous studies have established melatonin as one of the most effective anti-cancer treatments in existence. It inhibits cancer cell growth and proliferation; it destroys cancer cells, stops angiogenesis (new tumor blood vessel growth), and prevents harmful forms of estrogen from stimulating cancer cell growth. Despite its success in clinical trials and in doctors’ experiences with their patients, it has not been widely prescribed in conventional medicine, though its effects have proven to be superior to those of many chemotherapeutic drugs.

In one clinical trial, patients with glioblastoma, a type of brain cancer, were given either radiation and melatonin, or radiation alone. Twenty-three percent of the patients who took the melatonin were alive after a year, while none who had received only radiation were still alive. Similarly, in another study by oncologists in Italy, patients with non-small cell lung cancers who had failed chemotherapy were given melatonin. They were compared with other patients with non-small cell lung cancers who weren’t given melatonin. A year later, 26 percent of the patients who had taken melatonin were still alive;  Continue reading

Your Hands Reflect Your Health

They’re one of the most important parts of our body when it comes to day-to-day activities; without them we couldn’t cut vegetables, grip pliers, or text our friends. They’re revealing, too: Not only do scars and age spots recount our personal history but mystics all the way back to prehistory have “read” our futures in their lines and whorls.

But what if your hands could say more about you than that? What if, looking down at your palms and the five digits attached to them, you could discover early signs of dangerous diseases you didn’t yet know you had? “It used to be common for doctors to look at the hands for important clues to overall health,” says endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard of  Continue reading

Erectile Dysfunction and Diabetes type 1 Linked to Soy and Soy Products

Over the past few years, soy has been hailed as a miracle health food. Unfortunately, the complete opposite is true. Soy has been linked to a myriad of health conditions such as infantile leukemia, various forms of cancer, type-1 diabetes, malnutrition, thyroid dysfunction and even erectile dysfunction.

Research has shown that babies who have been fed soy-based formulas were at higher risk for developing type-1 diabetes and thyroid disease later in life. Soy-based formulas also contain up to 1000 times more aluminum than non soy-based formulas.

Soy contains a large amount of anti-nutrients (otherwise known as toxins). One of these is what is referred to as enzyme inhibitors. Enzyme inhibitors block the action of the enzymes which are required to digest proteins. Even cooking the soy at high temperatures does not break down these inhibitors. As a result, consuming soy and soy products can lead to conditions such as reduced protein digestion, excessive bloating, a deficiency of essential amino acids, abnormal thyroid functions, a higher risk of breast cancer in women who have had ovaries removed and abnormal blood  Continue reading

5 Ways Menopause Sabotages Sleep

Want to know one of the most telling signs that you’re nearing or in the midst of menopause? The concept of eight hours of uninterrupted sleep sounds as precious — and as out of reach — as fitting into the jeans you wore in high school. According to a comprehensive report on menopause and sleep by the National Sleep Foundation, 61 percent of women between 45 and 60 say they suffer from sleeplessness and other sleep problems. Adding insult to injury, most women don’t consider this problem serious enough to seek treatment. In fact, in a separate survey of women suffering from menopause-related sleep problems, 62 percent said they hadn’t talked to a healthcare professional about their symptoms.

Yet recent research shows that poor sleep and lack of sleep raise your risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, weight gain, and immune system dysfunction. It’s time to get some help! Continue reading

Liver, Dietary Proteins Key In Fertility

When you think about organs with an important role in reproduction, the liver most likely doesn’t spring to mind. But a new report in the February issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication, shows that estrogen receptors in the liver are critical for maintaining fertility. What’s more, the expression of those receptors is under the control of dietary amino acids, the building blocks of proteins.

The findings in mice may have important implications for some forms of infertility and for metabolic changes that come with menopause, the researchers say.

“This is the first time it has been demonstrated how important the liver is in fertility,” said Adriana Maggi of The University of Milan in Italy. “The idea that diet may have an impact on fertility isn’t totally new of course, but this explains how diet, and especially a diet poor in protein, can have a direct influence.”

Scientists had known that the liver expressed estrogen receptors and that those receptors played some role in metabolism. But, Maggi says, those receptors had not garnered a lot of attention.

Her group got interested in the liver receptors quite by accident. In studies of mice, “we saw that the organ that always had the highest activation of estrogen receptor was the liver,” she said. Initially they thought it must be a mistake and disregarded it, but over time they began to think maybe the mice were telling them something.

They now report that the expression of those estrogen receptors depends on dietary amino acids. Mice on a calorie-restricted diet and those lacking estrogen receptors in their livers showed a decline in an important hormone known as IGF-1. Blood levels of the hormone dropped to levels inadequate for the correct growth of the lining of their uteruses and normal progression of the estrous cycle, they show.

When the calorie-restricted mice were given more protein, their reproductive cycles got back on track. Dietary fats and carbohydrates, on the other hand, had no effect on the estrogen receptors or fertility.

The researchers suggest that this connection between amino acids, estrogen receptor signaling in liver, and reproductive functions may have clinical implications. For instance, Maggi said, this may explain why people who are anorexic are generally infertile. It suggests that diets loaded with too many carbohydrates and too little protein may hamper fertility.

The results also provide new clues for understanding the increased risk of metabolic and inflammatory disease in menopausal women. Maggi says that those changes may be explained in part by the lack of estrogen action in their livers and its downstream consequences.

Today, given concerns about hormone replacement therapy, menopausal women are often treated with drugs that target one organ or another to protect against specific conditions, such as atherosclerosis or osteoporosis. Given the liver’s role as a central coordinator of metabolism and producer of many other important hormones, she says, drugs that “target only the liver may solve all the problems.”