How to Combine Foods for Optimal Health

Story at-a-glance

Improper food combining is one of the primary factors that cause gas, flatulence, heartburn, and upset stomach. What’s worse, the resulting poor digestion can also contribute to malnutrition, even if you think you’re eating a decent diet

Disease is just as much Continue reading

The Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet and Its Role in Cancer Treatment

Story at-a-glance

A ketogenic diet, which calls for minimizing carbohydrates and replacing them with healthy fats and moderate amounts of high-quality protein, can offer hope against cancer, both for prevention and treatment

Your normal cells have the metabolic flexibility to adapt from using glucose to using ketone bodies. Cancer cells lack this ability so when you reduce carbs Continue reading

Diabetes Threat Lurks in the Shadows

If there was a life-changing — and potentially deadly — disease on my doorstep, I’d sure want to know about it in a hurry. And I bet you feel the same way.

But if that disease is diabetes, there’s a nearly 90 percent chance that you’ll have no idea before it strikes. According to a new Centers For Disease Control and Prevention study, there are literally millions of us rocketing at warp speed toward a life of diabetes, and we’re either not paying attention, Continue reading

A Natural Way to Fight the Blues

Depression is a major topic in the health news these days, as the veil is being lifted and people are feeling more and more comfortable disclosing their issues. Here is an introduction to SAMe and depression. It is one of the top natural supplements in the fight against depression. Continue reading

The Importance of Magnesium

The essential element magnesium has important anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. A lack of it is associated with a wide range of medical problems, from heart irregularities to asthma. Unfortunately, because of our poor diets, many of us don’t get enough magnesium.

Magnesium deficiency is very common, especially in those who eat a Western diet high in red meats, fats, and sugars, and low in fresh fruits and vegetables. Also, carbonated sodas deplete the body’s supply of magnesium. Americans, both young and old, gulp down these dangerous sodas at a frantic pace. As many as 75 percent of Americans eat diets deficient in magnesium, and two-thirds of these people are significantly deficient.

Magnesium is critical for the healthy function of blood vessels as well as for every tissue and organ in the body. Consider some of its important functions:

• Produces energy Continue reading

Composition of Different Fats – Oils We Eat

Here we examine the composition of vegetable oils and other animal fats in order to determine their usefulness and appropriateness in food preparation:

Duck and Goose Fat are semisolid at room temperature, containing about 35% saturated fat, 52% monounsaturated fat (including small amounts of antimicrobial palmitoleic acid) and about 13% polyunsaturated fat. The proportion of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids depends on what the birds have eaten. Duck and goose fat are quite stable and are highly prized in Europe for frying potatoes.

Chicken Fat is about 31% saturated, 49% monounsaturated (including moderate amounts of antimicrobial palmitoleic acid) and 20% polyunsaturated, most of which is omega-6 linoleic acid, although the amount of omega-3 can be raised by feeding chickens flax or fish meal, or allowing them to range free and eat insects. Although widely used for frying in kosher kitchens, it is inferior to duck and goose fat, which were traditionally preferred to chicken fat in Jewish cooking.

Lard or pork fat is about 40% saturated, 48% monounsaturated (including small amounts of antimicrobial palmitoleic acid) and 12% polyunsaturated. Like the fat of birds, the amount of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids will vary in lard according to what has been fed to the pigs. In the tropics, lard may also be a source of lauric acid if the pigs have eaten coconuts. Like duck and goose fat, lard is stable and a preferred fat for frying. It was widely used in America at the turn of the century.

It is a good source of vitamin D, especially in third-world countries where other animal foods are likely to be expensive. Some researchers believe that pork products should be avoided because they may contribute to cancer. Others suggest that only pork meat presents a problem and that pig fat in the form of lard is safe and healthy.

Beef and Mutton Tallows are 50-55% saturated, about 40% monounsaturated and contain small amounts of the polyunsaturates, usually less than 3%. Suet, which is the fat from the cavity of the animal, is 70-80% saturated. Suet and tallow are very stable fats and can be used for frying. Traditional cultures valued these fats for their health benefits. They are a good source of antimicrobial palmitoleic acid.

Olive Oil contains 75% oleic acid, the stable monounsaturated fat, along with 13% saturated fat, 10% omega-6 linoleic acid and 2% omega-3 linolenic acid. The high percentage of oleic acid makes olive oil ideal for salads and for cooking at moderate temperatures. Extra virgin olive oil is also rich in antioxidants. It should be cloudy, indicating that it has not been filtered, and have a golden yellow color, indicating that it is made from fully ripened olives.

Olive oil has withstood the test of time; it is the safest vegetable oil you can use, but don’t overdo. The longer chain fatty acids found in olive oil are more likely to contribute to the buildup of body fat than the short- and medium-chain fatty acids found in butter, coconut oil or palm kernel oil.

Peanut Oil contains 48% oleic acid, 18% saturated fat and 34% omega-6 linoleic acid. Like olive oil, peanut oil is relatively stable and, therefore, appropriate for stir-frys on occasion. But the high percentage of omega-6 presents a potential danger, so use of peanut oil should be strictly limited.

Sesame Oil contains 42% oleic acid, 15% saturated fat, and 43% omega-6 linoleic acid. Sesame oil is similar in composition to peanut oil. It can be used for frying because it contains unique antioxidants that are not destroyed by heat. However, the high percentage of omega-6 militates against exclusive use.

Safflower, Corn, Sunflower, Soybean and Cottonseed Oils all contain over 50% omega-6 and, except for soybean oil, only minimal amounts of omega-3. Safflower oil contains almost 80% omega-6. Researchers are just beginning to discover the dangers of excess omega-6 oils in the diet, whether rancid or not.

Use of these oils should be strictly limited. They should never be consumed after they have been heated, as in cooking, frying or baking. High oleic safflower and sunflower oils, produced from hybrid plants, have a composition similar to olive oil, namely, high amounts of oleic acid and only small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids and, thus, are more stable than traditional varieties. However, it is difficult to find truly cold-pressed versions of these oils.

Canola Oil contains 5% saturated fat, 57% oleic acid, 23% omega-6 and 10%-15% omega-3. The newest oil on the market, canola oil was developed from the rape seed, a member of the mustard family. Rape seed is unsuited to human consumption because it contains a very-long-chain fatty acid called erucic acid, which under some circumstances is associated with fibrotic heart lesions.

Canola oil was bred to contain little if any erucic acid and has drawn the attention of nutritionists because of its high oleic acid content. But there are some indications that canola oil presents dangers of its own. It has a high sulphur content and goes rancid easily. Baked goods made with canola oil develop mold very quickly. During the deodorizing process, the omega-3 fatty acids of processed canola oil are transformed into trans fatty acids, similar to those in margarine and possibly more dangerous.

A recent study indicates that “heart healthy” canola oil actually creates a deficiency of vitamin E, a vitamin required for a healthy cardiovascular system. Other studies indicate that even low-erucic-acid canola oil causes heart lesions, particularly when the diet is low in saturated fat.

Flax Seed Oil contains 9% saturated fatty acids, 18% oleic acid, 16% omega-6 and 57% omega-3. With its extremely high omega-3 content, flax seed oil provides a remedy for the omega-6/omega-3 imbalance so prevalent in America today. Not surprisingly, Scandinavian folk lore values flax seed oil as a health food. New extraction and bottling methods have minimized rancidity problems. It should always be kept refrigerated, never heated, and consumed in small amounts in salad dressings and spreads.

Tropical Oils are more saturated than other vegetable oils. Palm oil is about 50% saturated, with 41% oleic acid and about 9% linoleic acid. Coconut oil is 92% saturated with over two-thirds of the saturated fat in the form of medium-chain fatty acids (often called medium-chain triglycerides).

Of particular interest is lauric acid, found in large quantities in both coconut oil and in mother’s milk. This fatty acid has strong antifungal and antimicrobial properties. Coconut oil protects tropical populations from bacteria and fungus so prevalent in their food supply; as third-world nations in tropical areas have switched to polyunsaturated vegetable oils, the incidence of intestinal disorders and immune deficiency diseases has increased dramatically.

Because coconut oil contains lauric acid, it is often used in baby formulas. Palm kernel oil, used primarily in candy coatings, also contains high levels of lauric acid. These oils are extremely stable and can be kept at room temperature for many months without becoming rancid. Highly saturated tropical oils do not contribute to heart disease but have nourished healthy populations for millennia. It is a shame we do not use these oils for cooking and baking—the bad rap they have received is the result of intense lobbying by the domestic vegetable oil industry.

Red palm oil has a strong taste that most will find disagreeable—although it is used extensively throughout Africa—but clarified palm oil, which is tasteless and white in color, was formerly used as shortening and in the production of commercial French fries, while coconut oil was used in cookies, crackers and pastries. The saturated fat scare has forced manufacturers to abandon these safe and healthy oils in favor of hydrogenated soybean, corn, canola and cottonseed oils.

In summary, our choice of fats and oils is one of extreme importance. Most people, especially infants and growing children, benefit from more fat in the diet rather than less. But the fats we eat must be chosen with care.

Avoid all processed foods containing newfangled hydrogenated fats and polyunsaturated oils.

Instead, use traditional vegetable oils like extra virgin olive oil and small amounts of unrefined flax seed oil. Acquaint yourself with the merits of coconut oil for baking and with animal fats for occasional frying.

Eat egg yolks and other animal fats with the proteins to which they are attached. And, finally, use as much good quality butter as you like, with the happy assurance that it is a wholesome—indeed, an essential—food for you and your whole family.

Organic butter, extra virgin olive oil, and expeller-expressed flax oil in opaque containers are available in health food stores and gourmet markets.

Inflammation Causes Heart Disease – Not Cholesterol

Cholesterol Does Not Cause Heart Disease – Inflammation Does
Opinion makers insisted heart disease resulted from the simple fact of elevated blood cholesterol.

The only accepted therapy was prescribing medications to lower cholesterol and a diet that severely restricted fat intake.
The latter of course we insisted would lower cholesterol and heart disease. Deviations from these recommendations were considered heresy and could quite possibly result in malpractice.

It Is Not Working!

These recommendations are no longer scientifically or morally defensible. *The discovery a few years ago that inflammation in the artery wall is the real cause of heart disease is slowly leading to a
paradigm shift in how heart disease and other chronic ailments will be treated.

The long-established dietary recommendations have created epidemics of obesity and diabetes*, the consequences of which dwarf any historical plague in terms of mortality, human suffering and dire economic consequences.

Despite the fact that 25% of the population takes expensive statin medications and despite the fact we have reduced the fat content of our diets, more Americans will die this year of heart disease than ever before.

Statistics from the American Heart Association show that 75 million Americans currently suffer from heart disease, 20 million have diabetes and 57 million have pre-diabetes. These disorders are effecting younger and younger people in greater numbers every year.*

Simply stated, without inflammation being present in the body, there is no way that cholesterol would accumulate in the wall of the blood vessel and cause heart disease and strokes. Without inflammation, cholesterol would move freely throughout the body as nature intended. It is inflammation that causes cholesterol to become trapped.*

Inflammation is not complicated — it is quite simply your body’s natural defense to a foreign invader such as a bacteria, toxin or virus.

The cycle of inflammation is perfect in how it protects your body from these bacterial and viral invaders. However, *if we chronically expose the body to injury by toxins or foods the human body was never designed to process, a condition occurs called chronic inflammation*. Chronic inflammation is just as harmful as acute inflammation is beneficial.

What thoughtful person would willfully expose himself repeatedly to foods or other substances that are known to cause injury to the body? Well, smokers perhaps, but at least they made that choice willfully.*

The rest of us have simply followed the recommended mainstream diet that is low in fat and high in polyunsaturated fats and carbohydrates, not knowing we were causing repeated injury to our blood vessels. This repeated injury creates chronic inflammation leading to heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity. Let me repeat that. The injury and inflammation in our blood vessels is caused by the low fat diet that has been recommended for years by mainstream medicine.

What are the biggest culprits of chronic inflammation? Quite simply, they are the overload of simple, highly processed carbohydrates (sugar, flour and all the products made from them) and the excess consumption of omega-6 vegetable oils like soybean, corn and sunflower that are found in many processed foods.*

Take a moment to visualize rubbing a stiff brush repeatedly over soft skin until it becomes quite red and nearly bleeding. Let’s say you kept this up several times a day, every day for five
years. If you could tolerate this painful brushing, you would have a bleeding, swollen infected area that became worse with each repeated injury. This is a good way to visualize the inflammatory process that could be going on in your body right now.

Regardless of where the inflammatory process occurs, externally or internally, it is the same. I have peered inside thousands upon thousands of arteries. A diseased artery looks as if someone took a
brush and scrubbed repeatedly against its wall. *Several times a day, every day, the foods we eat create small injuries compounding into more injuries, causing the body to respond continuously and appropriately with inflammation.*

While we savor the tantalizing taste of a sweet roll, our bodies respond alarmingly as if a foreign invader arrived declaring war. Foods loaded with sugars and simple carbohydrates, or processed with omega-6 oils for long shelf life have been the mainstay of the American diet for six decades. *These foods have been slowly poisoning everyone.*

How does eating a simple sweet roll create a cascade of inflammation to make you sick?

Imagine spilling syrup on your keyboard and you have a visual of what occurs inside the cell. *When we consume simple carbohydrates such as sugar, blood sugar rises rapidly. In response, your pancreas secretes insulin whose primary purpose is to drive sugar into each cell where it is stored for energy. If the cell is full and does not need glucose,* it is rejected to avoid extra sugar gumming up the works.*

When your full cells reject the extra glucose, blood sugar rises producing more insulin and the glucose converts to stored fat.*

What does all this have to do with inflammation? *Blood sugar is controlled in a very narrow range. Extra sugar molecules attach to a variety of proteins that in turn injure the blood vessel wall. This
repeated injury to the blood vessel wall sets off inflammation.* When you spike your blood sugar level several times a day, every day, it is exactly like taking sandpaper to the inside of your delicate blood vessels.

While you may not be able to see it, rest assured it is there. I saw it in over 5,000 surgical patients spanning 25 years who all shared one common denominator – inflammation in their arteries.

Let’s get back to the sweet roll. That innocent looking goody not only contains sugars, it is baked in one of many omega-6 oils such as soybean. Chips and fries are soaked in soybean oil; processed foods are manufactured with omega-6 oils for longer shelf life. While omega-6’s are essential -they are part of every cell membrane controlling what goes in and out of the cell – they must be in the correct balance with omega-3’s.

If the balance shifts by consuming excessive omega-6, the cell membrane produces chemicals called cytokines that directly cause inflammation. Today’s mainstream American diet has produced an extreme imbalance of these two fats. The ratio of imbalance ranges from 15:1 to as high as 30:1 in favor of omega-6. That’s a tremendous amount of cytokines causing inflammation. In today’s food environment, a 3:1 ratio would be optimal and healthy.

To make matters worse, the excess weight you are carrying from eating these foods creates overloaded fat cells that pour out large quantities of pro-inflammatory chemicals that add to the injury caused by having high blood sugar. The process that began with a sweet roll turns into a vicious cycle over time that creates heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and finally, Alzheimer’s disease, as the inflammatory process continues unabated.

There is no escaping the fact that the more we consume prepared and processed foods, the more we trip the inflammation switch little by little each day. The human body cannot process, nor was it designed to consume, foods packed with sugars and soaked in omega-6 oils.

There is but one answer to quieting inflammation, and that is returning to foods closer to their natural state. *To build muscle, eat more protein. Choose carbohydrates that are very complex such as colorful fruits and vegetables*. *Cut down on or eliminate inflammation- causing omega-6 fats like corn and soybean oil and the processed foods that are made from them. One tablespoon of corn oil contains 7,280 mg of omega-6; soybean contains 6,940mg. Instead, use olive oil or butter from grass-fed beef.*

Animal fats contain less than 20% omega-6 and are much less likely to cause inflammation than the supposedly healthy oils labelled polyunsaturated. Forget the “science” that has been drummed into your head for decades. The science that saturated fat alone causes heart disease is non-existent. The science that saturated fat raises blood cholesterol is also very weak. *Since we now know that _cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease_, the concern about saturated fat is even more absurd today.*

The cholesterol theory led to the no-fat, low-fat recommendations that in turn created the very foods now causing an epidemic of inflammation.

Mainstream medicine made a terrible mistake when it advised people to avoid saturated fat in favor of foods high in omega-6 fats._* We now have an epidemic of arterial inflammation leading to heart disease and other silent killers.

What you can do is choose whole foods your grandmother served and not those your mom turned to as grocery store aisles filled with manufactured foods.* By eliminating inflammatory foods and adding essential nutrients from fresh unprocessed food, you will reverse years of damage in your arteries* and throughout your body from consuming the typical American diet.

Heart Surgeon Admits Huge Mistake

By Dwight Lundell, MD

We physicians with all our training, knowledge and authority often
acquire a rather large ego that tends to make it difficult to admit we
are wrong. So, here it is. I freely admit to being wrong.. As a heart
surgeon with 25 years experience, having performed over 5,000 open-heart
surgeries, today is my day to right the wrong with medical and
scientific fact.

I trained for many years with other prominent physicians labeled
“opinion makers.” Bombarded with scientific literature, continually
attending education seminars, we opinion makers insisted heart disease
resulted from the simple fact of elevated blood cholesterol.

The only accepted therapy was prescribing medications to lower
cholesterol and a diet that severely restricted fat intake.
The latter of course we insisted would lower cholesterol and heart
disease. Deviations from these recommendations were considered heresy
and could quite possibly result in malpractice.

It Is Not Working!

These recommendations are no longer scientifically or morally
defensible. *The discovery a few years ago that inflammation in the
artery wall is the real cause of heart disease is slowly leading to a
paradigm shift in how heart disease and other chronic ailments will be
treated.

The long-established dietary recommendations have created epidemics of
obesity and diabetes*, the consequences of which dwarf any historical
plague in terms of mortality, human suffering and dire economic
consequences.

Despite the fact that 25% of the population takes expensive statin
medications and despite the fact we have reduced the fat content of our
diets, more Americans will die this year of heart disease than ever
before.

Statistics from the American Heart Association show that 75 million
Americans currently suffer from heart disease, 20 million have diabetes
and 57 million have pre-diabetes. These disorders are affecting younger
and younger people in greater numbers every year.*

Simply stated, without inflammation being present in the body, there is
no way that cholesterol would accumulate in the wall of the blood vessel
and cause heart disease and strokes. Without inflammation, cholesterol
would move freely throughout the body as nature intended. It is
inflammation that causes cholesterol to become trapped.*

Inflammation is not complicated — it is quite simply your body’s
natural defense to a foreign invader such as a bacteria, toxin or virus.

The cycle of inflammation is perfect in how it protects your body from
these bacterial and viral invaders. However, *if we chronically expose
the body to injury by toxins or foods the human body was never designed
to process, a condition occurs called chronic inflammation*. Chronic
inflammation is just as harmful as acute inflammation is beneficial.

What thoughtful person would willfully expose himself repeatedly to
foods or other substances that are known to cause injury to the body?
Well, smokers perhaps, but at least they made that choice willfully.*

The rest of us have simply followed the recommended mainstream diet that
is low in fat and high in polyunsaturated fats and carbohydrates, not
knowing we were causing repeated injury to our blood vessels. This
repeated injury creates chronic inflammation leading to heart disease,
stroke, diabetes and obesity. Let me repeat that. The injury and
inflammation in our blood vessels is caused by the low fat diet that has
been recommended for years by mainstream medicine.

What are the biggest culprits of chronic inflammation? Quite simply,
they are the overload of simple, highly processed carbohydrates (sugar,
flour and all the products made from them) and the excess consumption of
omega-6 vegetable oils like soybean, corn and sunflower that are found
in many processed foods.*

Take a moment to visualize rubbing a stiff brush repeatedly over soft
skin until it becomes quite red and nearly bleeding.
Let’s say you kept this up several times a day, every day for five
years. If you could tolerate this painful brushing, you would have a
bleeding, swollen infected area that became worse with each repeated
injury. This is a good way to visualize the inflammatory process that
could be going on in your body right now.

Regardless of where the inflammatory process occurs, externally or
internally, it is the same. I have peered inside thousands upon
thousands of arteries. A diseased artery looks as if someone took a
brush and scrubbed repeatedly against its wall. *Several times a day,
every day, the foods we eat create small injuries compounding into more
injuries, causing the body to respond continuously and appropriately
with inflammation.*

While we savor the tantalizing taste of a sweet roll, our bodies respond
alarmingly as if a foreign invader arrived declaring war. Foods loaded
with sugars and simple carbohydrates, or processed with omega-6 oils for
long shelf life have been the mainstay of the American diet for six
decades. *These foods have been slowly poisoning everyone.*

How does eating a simple sweet roll create a cascade of inflammation to
make you sick?

Imagine spilling syrup on your keyboard and you have a visual of what
occurs inside the cell. *When we consume simple carbohydrates such as
sugar, blood sugar rises rapidly. In response, your pancreas secretes
insulin whose primary purpose is to drive sugar into each cell where it
is stored for energy. If the cell is full and does not need glucose,* it
is rejected to avoid extra sugar gumming up the works.*

When your full cells reject the extra glucose, blood sugar rises
producing more insulin and the glucose converts to stored fat.*

What does all this have to do with inflammation? *Blood sugar is
controlled in a very narrow range. Extra sugar molecules attach to a
variety of proteins that in turn injure the blood vessel wall. This
repeated injury to the blood vessel wall sets off inflammation.* When
you spike your blood sugar level several times a day, every day, it is
exactly like taking sandpaper to the inside of your delicate blood
vessels.

While you may not be able to see it, rest assured it is there. I saw it
in over 5,000 surgical patients spanning 25 years who all shared one
common denominator – inflammation in their arteries.

Let’s get back to the sweet roll. That innocent looking goody not only
contains sugars, it is baked in one of many omega-6 oils such as
soybean. Chips and fries are soaked in soybean oil; processed foods are
manufactured with omega-6 oils for longer shelf life. While omega-6’s
are essential -they are part of every cell membrane controlling what
goes in and out of the cell – they must be in the correct balance with
omega-3’s.

If the balance shifts by consuming excessive omega-6, the cell membrane
produces chemicals called cytokines that directly cause inflammation.
Today’s mainstream American diet has produced an extreme imbalance of
these two fats. The ratio of imbalance ranges from 15:1 to as high as
30:1 in favor of omega-6. That’s a tremendous amount of cytokines
causing inflammation. In today’s food environment, a 3:1 ratio would be
optimal and healthy.

To make matters worse, the excess weight you are carrying from eating
these foods creates overloaded fat cells that pour out large quantities
of pro-inflammatory chemicals that add to the injury caused by having
high blood sugar. The process that began with a sweet roll turns into a
vicious cycle over time that creates heart disease, high blood pressure,
diabetes and finally, Alzheimer’s disease, as the inflammatory process
continues unabated.

There is no escaping the fact that the more we consume prepared and
processed foods, the more we trip the inflammation switch little by
little each day. The human body cannot process, nor was it designed to
consume, foods packed with sugars and soaked in omega-6 oils.

There is but one answer to quieting inflammation, and that is returning
to foods closer to their natural state. *To build muscle, eat more
protein. Choose carbohydrates that are very complex such as colorful
fruits and vegetables*. *Cut down on or eliminate inflammation- causing
omega-6 fats like corn and soybean oil and the processed foods that are
made from them. One tablespoon of corn oil contains 7,280 mg of
omega-6; soybean contains 6,940mg. Instead, use olive oil or butter from
grass-fed beef.*

Animal fats contain less than 20% omega-6 and are much less likely to
cause inflammation than the supposedly healthy oils labelled
polyunsaturated. Forget the “science” that has been drummed into your
head for decades. The science that saturated fat alone causes heart
disease is non-existent. The science that saturated fat raises blood
cholesterol is also very weak. *Since we now know that _cholesterol is
not the cause of heart disease_, the concern about saturated fat is even
more absurd today.*

The cholesterol theory led to the no-fat, low-fat recommendations that
in turn created the very foods now causing an epidemic of inflammation.
*_Mainstream medicine made a terrible mistake when it advised people to
avoid saturated fat in favor of foods high in omega-6 fats._* We now
have an epidemic of arterial inflammation leading to heart disease and
other silent killers.

What you can do is choose whole foods your grandmother served and not
those your mom turned to as grocery store aisles filled with
manufactured foods.* By eliminating inflammatory foods and adding
essential nutrients from fresh unprocessed food, you will reverse years
of damage in your arteries* and throughout your body from consuming the
typical American diet.

[Ed. Note: Dr. Dwight Lundell is the past Chief of Staff and Chief of
Surgery at Banner Heart Hospital, Mesa, AZ. His private practice,
Cardiac Care Center was in Mesa, AZ. Recently Dr. Lundell left surgery
to focus on the nutritional treatment of heart disease. He is the
founder of Healthy Humans Foundation that promotes human health with a
focus on helping large corporations promote wellness. He is the author
of The Cure for Heart Disease and

Vitamin B 6 for Metabolism of Proteins, Fats and Carbohydrates

Vitamin B 6 complex is a blend of vitamin B6 and enzymes.

B6 is an essential water soluble vitamin actively involved in the metabolism of proteins, fats and carbohydrates.

Vitamin B6 complex is vital for performing normal functions of nervous and immune system. It is also responsible for producing red blood cells, transporting oxygen and converting tryptophan to niacin.

Red blood cells transport oxygen from one body part to another and aids in the synthesis of neurotransmitters that are essential for normal nerve cell communication.

The most common sources of Vitamin B6 are fish, chicken, potatoes, liver, pork, wheat germ, bananas, and dried beans. These real food sources should be consumed in optimal quantity to prevent B6 deficiency.

Inadequate diet, poor availability of vitamin rich food sources and certain health conditions most often lead to B6 deficiency.

The symptoms of this deficiency are not well defined. They occur after prolonged deficiency and include nervousness, irritability, insomnia, difficulty in walking, muscle weakness, fissures and cracks at the corner of the mouth.

These deficiency symptoms can be curbed by consuming B6 rich food sources or by taking complete B vitamin supplement.

The deficiency symptoms are vaguely defined fro B6 but the symptoms of toxicity are very well defined. Toxicity occurs when an individual consumes high doses of Vitamin B6.

Overdose or toxicity of this vitamin complex often results in numbness in feet and leg associated with severe pain. For some people, who are suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome or nerve damage, an overdose can be beneficial but for the normal individual it will lead to fatal health conditions.

It is very important to consult a doctor before taking an overdose of this vitamin.

Even though required in small traces, Vitamin B 6 is an essential B group vitamin. So, try to incorporate healthy and nutritious food sources rather than consuming vitamin supplements for a healthy growth.

Depression Leads to Protein Linked to Heart Disease

BLOOMINGTON – Depression leads to elevated inflammatory proteins in the human body, according to researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Led by Dr. Jesse Stewart, researchers found that depressive symptoms are associated with increases over time in interleukin-6, an inflammatory protein that predicts cardiovascular events.

On the other hand, levels of interleukin-6 were not linked to subsequent increases in depressive symptoms.

The new study is the first to examine both directions of the depression-inflammation connection and to measure the physical symptoms of depression, such as fatigue and sleep disturbance, in addition to the cognitive-emotional symptoms, such as pessimism and sadness.

While many previous studies have linked depression to increased inflammatory protein levels measured at the same time, but they couldn’t speak to which is the cause and which is the effect.

“There is two-way communication between the brain and the immune system, so we had to determine whether activation of the body’s immune system sent a signal to the brain to affect mood and behavior or whether the depression activated the immune system,” said Dr. Stewart.

The participants in the study consisted of 263 healthy men and women aged 50-70 years at the start of the study.

They were tested at baseline and again six years later to determine their levels of depressive symptoms and interleukin-6.

Levels of C-reactive protein, another inflammatory protein, were also measured but were not related to depression.

Stewart said that the strength of the association of depression with future heart disease is similar to that of traditional risk factors like smoking, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol.

“Promotion of inflammation may be one pathway through which depression may ‘get under the skin’ to negatively influence cardiovascular health. The link to cardiovascular disease demonstrates that there may be physical as well as mental health reasons to treat depression,” said Stewart.

The study has been published in the latest issue of the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity.

Short-Term Stress Boosts Anti-Tumor Activity

PALO ALTO – In a study on laboratory mice, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that bouts of relatively short-term stress can boost the immune system and protect against one type of cancer.

The researchers also said that the beneficial effects of this occasional angst could last for weeks after the stressful situation has ended.

The finding is surprising because chronic stress has the opposite effect-taxing the immune system and increasing susceptibility to disease.

“This is the first evidence that this type of short-lived stress may enhance anti-tumor activity. This is a promising new way of thinking that calls for more research. We hope that it will eventually lead to applications that help us to care for those who are ill, by maximally harnessing the body’s natural defenses while also using other medical treatments,” said Dr. Firdaus Dhabhar.

The researchers studied a particular type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma that is known to be vulnerable to attack by the immune system.

Certain types of stress, such as the so-called fight-or-flight response to an immediate but temporary threat, has been shown to increase the recruitment of immune cells to the surface of the skin and the surrounding lymph nodes-presumably in preparation for imminent injury.

“Acute stress galvanizes an organism’s protective systems. But although it’s one of nature’s fundamental survival systems, thus far it’s been rather underappreciated,” said Dhabhar.

The researchers focused on understanding the physiological effects of both acute and chronic stress.

They investigated the effect of short-term, or acute, stress on 30 laboratory mice exposed for 10 weeks to thrice-weekly doses of cancer-causing ultraviolet light.

They found that fewer of the mice that had been acutely stressed developed skin cancer during weeks 11 through 21, and that those that did exhibited a lower total amount of tumors (a measurement called tumor burden) than the non-stressed mice.

The stressed mice weren’t protected indefinitely-almost 90 percent of the mice in both groups developed cancer after week 22, though the stressed group continued to have fewer tumors until week 26.

“It’s possible that the pre-tumor cells were eliminated more efficiently in the group that was stressed.

There may also have been a longer-term enhancement of immunity as we have seen in our non-cancer-related studies. However, acute stress did not lower tumor burden beyond week 26. We are in the process of determining why,” said Dhabhar.

However, other stress-induced changes lingered for weeks.

The researchers found that, during the same time period, the skin of the stressed mice had higher levels of immune-activating genes than did the control group, almost as if the mice were preparing for battle.

He compared the effect to how drug-makers often increase the potency of vaccines by including generic immune-activating molecules called adjuvants.

But he is convinced that acute stress may be better for us than most of us think, and that bio-behavioral interventions are worth investigating.

The study will be published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity.

Found: Protein Linked to Storage of Fat

EDINBURGH – A protein present in all cells in the body could help scientists better understand how we store fat.

University of Edinburgh (U-E) researchers have found that the protein invadolysin, essential for healthy cell division, is present in lipid droplets — the parts of cells used to store fat.

The study also found that lower levels of invadolysin were linked to reduced amounts of fat deposits.

The findings could ultimately help scientists better understand obesity-related complications, which can include diabetes, blood clotting and heart disease.

Margaret Heck, professor at the U-E Centre for Cardiovascular Science, said: “The presence of this protein in lipid droplets may suggest that it has a role in obesity.”

“What we would like to understand is whether its presence is related to obesity, and if so, whether the protein’s activity aggravates obesity and its consequences. Understanding its role will help us better understand how the body stores fat,” she said.

Invadolysin was first identified by Heck’s lab in fruit flies. The latest study looked at the protein in human cells, pinpointing its presence in the part of cells used to store fat.

The researchers also found that when invadolysin was absent in fruit fly larvae, fat storage was impaired.

Further studies will look at how the protein affects metabolism to better understand its role in obesity-related disorders.

These findings were published in the Journal of Cell Science.

Novel Cancer Therapy Found by TA Researchers

TEL AVIV –  Tel Aviv University researchers have invented a technique to destroy malignant cells in the breast while leaving healthy ones untouched. If the results produced in lab tests on mice can be applied to human patients, the result could be a revolution in cancer care, though human clinical tests are years away, at best.

The killing of cancerous cells in the lab was accomplished by using a chemical generally used to treat strokes. The work by Prof. Malka Cohen-Armon of TAU’s Sackler Medical School was just published in the open online journal, BioMed Central.

The international research team she headed found that potent phenanthridine derived polyADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors that were originally designed to protect cells from cell death under stress conditions such as stroke or inflammation efficiently eradicate MCF-7 and MDA231 breast cancer cells without impairing normal cells.

Cohen-Armon said they made the discovery “by chance,” but that the findings provide “a new therapeutic approach for a selective eradication of abundant human cancers.”

New Chip Can Detect Cancer Early

TORONTO – In a major breakthrough for early cancer detection, Canadian researchers have developed an inexpensive microchip that is sensitive enough to detect the type and severity of the disease.

The microchip has been successfully tested on prostate cancer, and head and neck cancer models.

It can also be used to diagnose other cancers, as well as infectious diseases such as HIV and the H1N1 flu.

Researchers at the University of Toronto here used nanomaterials for the first time to build the sensitive microchip.

In their work reported in Nature Nanotechnology this week, the researchers say the new device will make sophisticated molecular diagnostics easily available soon.

“The remarkable innovation is an indication that the age of nanomedicine is dawning,” David Naylor, who is president of the University of Toronto and professor of medicine, was quoted as saying in a university statement.

The device quickly picks up the ‘biomarkers’ that hint at the presence of cancer at the cellular level, even though these biomolecules – genes that indicate aggressive or benign forms of the disease – are generally present at low levels in biological samples, the statement said.

Analysis can be completed in 30 minutes, compared to days taken by the current diagnostic procedures.

“Today, it takes a room filled with computers to evaluate a clinically relevant sample of cancer biomarkers and the results aren’t quickly available,” said research leader and medicine professor Shana Kelley.

“Our team was able to measure biomolecules on an electronic chip the size of your fingertip and analyse the sample within half an hour. The instrumentation required for This analysis can be contained within a unit the size of a BlackBerry,” she said.

Since the current conventional, flat metal electrical sensors are inadequate to sense cancer’s particular biomarkers, the Toronto team fabricated a chip and decorated it with nanometre-sized wires and molecular ‘bait’ to make it more sensitive.

“Uniting DNA with speedy, miniaturised electronic chips is an example of cross-disciplinary convergence,” said co-researcher Ted Sargent.

“By working with outstanding researchers in nanomaterials, pharmaceutical sciences, and electrical engineering, we were able to demonstrate that controlled integration of nanomaterials provides a major advantage in disease detection and analysis,” he said.

Vitamin B6 Tied to Better Prostate Cancer Survival

Vitamin B6 Tied to Better Prostate Cancer Survival

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Men with earlier-stage prostate cancer may have better survival odds if they get a little more than the recommended amount of vitamin B6 everyday, a new study suggests.

The findings, reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, do not prove that vitamin B6 improves prostate cancer survival. But they do point to an association between survival and amounts of the vitamin that are readily attainable through a balanced diet.

Researchers found that among 525 Swedish men with prostate cancer, the one-quarter with the highest B6 intakes were 29 percent less likely than those with the lowest intakes to die of the disease during the study period.

Men in the former group averaged 2.2 to 2.9 milligrams of vitamin B6 per day, while those in the latter group got 1.3 to 1.9 milligrams daily. The recommended vitamin B6 intake for men age 50 and younger is 1.3 mg per day, while older men are encouraged to get 1.7 mg.

The protective effect of B6 appeared confined to men whose tumors had not yet spread beyond the prostate at the time of diagnosis.

When the researchers considered only these men, they found that those who got the most B6 had only 5 percent of the risk of dying as their counterparts with the lowest intakes of the vitamin.

The results offer “exciting preliminary support” for dietary factors in long-term prostate cancer survival, according to lead researcher Dr. Julie L. Kasperzyk, a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

However, she told Reuters Health, the findings “will need to be confirmed or refuted in additional, larger studies before recommendations can be made to the general public or to prostate cancer patients.”

Vitamin B6 is found in a range of foods, including beans, potatoes, bananas, meat, chicken, peanut butter and certain fish, like salmon and tuna. It serves a variety of functions in the body — one being its role, together with other B vitamins, in DNA synthesis and repair.

Cancer arises from the uncontrolled growth of genetically abnormal cells — which, in theory, means that the B vitamins could affect the development or spread of certain cancers.

For their study, Kasperzyk and her colleagues looked at the intakes of vitamins B6, B12, folate, riboflavin and methionine among 525 prostate cancer patients who were followed for up to 20 years. Few men took dietary supplements, Kasperzyk said, so the study focused on consumption from food.

Overall, 42 percent of the men died of prostate cancer during the study period. The odds were lower, however, among those with the highest vitamin B6 intakes — although there was no evidence of protection among men diagnosed with advanced cancer.

None of the other nutrients was linked to prostate cancer survival.

Kasperzyk said that vitamin B6 has a number of functions in the body that are not shared by the other nutrients her team studied.

“What is most relevant to prostate cancer,” she explained, “is the potential link between vitamin B6 and reduced responsiveness of the prostate to testosterone.”