The Dangers of Carrageenan

Did You Know…

…consuming this “natural” food additive can have fatal consequences?

Although it’s usually listed as a “natural” ingredient on food labels, a common food additive called carrageenan (a highly processed derivative of red seaweed) is anything but healthful. Continue reading

Food Fraud Creating Dangerous Allergy Risks

Supermarket surprise could leave you sick and angry

You know that old saying that truth is stranger than fiction? Well it turns out that the ingredient labels on some of our favorite foods may be pure fiction — and the strange truth is going to leave you furious. Continue reading

Getting a Grip on Childhood Obesity

American adults are overweight and obese, which is a huge problem for our healthcare system, tax dollars, productivity and quality of life. But the fact that our kids are increasingly obese means we may be dooming the next generation to an unhappy lifetime of chronic disease. We have to take action now to halt the juvenile obesity epidemic, or the consequences will be tragic.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), “Obesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States — triple the rate from just one generation ago.” That 17 percent equates to 12.5 million obese children, ages 2 to 19.

In its 2011 “Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report,” the CDC blames a good part of this problem on the serving and advertising of “sugar drinks and less healthy foods on school campuses.” Ads sell junk foods to kids, while parents feed their children what they ask for instead of providing balanced meals. Added to that, kids are eating supersized portions of foods containing too much sugar and fat.

If we consider the alarming numbers of inner-city children with weight problems, it’s obvious that kids don’t get enough exercise and don’t have access to safe places to play. Even for those interested in outdoor activity, finding a safe place or even getting to one is an issue. In its “State Indicator Report on Physical Activity,  Continue reading

MSG Large Contributor to Illnesses

Despite common perception, the toxic food additive MSG is everywhere – not just in Chinese food! This taste enhancer is actually hidden under dozens of ingredient names in all sorts of processed foods, restaurant foods, beverages, chewing gums, vitamins and supplements. It is added to foods in higher dosages than ever before, and more and more people are experiencing symptoms.

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) is a health concern because it contains glutamate. Glutamate is the salt form of “Free Glutamic Acid” – a toxin that is associated with many health problems (http://www.msgmyth.com/symptoms.html). Due to insufficient labeling laws, food companies use many ingredients (http://www.msgmyth.com/hidden_names…) to disguise Free Glutamic Acid in their products, so consumers must look for more than just “MSG” on food labels. Continue reading

What Is Fructose and Why Is it in Everything?

We all know fructose is some type of sweetener, we see it listed on so many food labels: ketchup, soft-drinks, energy drinks, cereals, cookies, breads, crackers, ice creams, canned soups, and more. And most of us think fructose has something to do with fruits. So in some way it’s okay; it’s just some sweetener thing derived from natural fruit sugar.

But it’s not. Well it’s half true. Fructose is one of the main sugars from fruits, the others being sucrose and glucose, so that’s true. But the fructose found in processed foods is an entirely different story.

Food manufacturers and producers are sweetening our food with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) which does not come from fruits at all. It comes from a highly processed blend derived from corn, which many times can be genetically modified.

Too much HFCS in the diet means extra  Continue reading

Food Dyes Linked to Hyperactivity in Some Children

Food dyes used in everything from candy to lunch meat may contribute to worsening hyperactivity in some kids, researchers told an FDA advisory panel on Wednesday.

The data are far from conclusive and scientists point out they don’t know how the possible effects might work. But the concerns have the FDA mulling new warnings on food packages to alert parents to the possible connection.

Over two days of hearings in Silver Spring, Md., expert advisors are listening to evidence and arguments on a possible connection between food dyes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Some studies have shown that hyperactive children can improve after food dyes are eliminated from their diet. Many other studies don’t show that. Even positive studies tend not to single out individual food dyes. Others only show improvement when parents are judging kids’ behavior, not when doctors or teachers do. Continue reading