Diet’s Role in Lowering Risk of Repeat Heart Attacks

Patients with heart disease frequently assume that medication is enough to forestall a repeat heart attack or stroke, but a large new study shows the preventive power of a healthy diet. Continue reading

Dangerous Side Effects of This Specific Type of Drug Revealed

A morsel of health news says that there is a high risk of fractures, falls, and osteoporosis among epilepsy patients using antiepileptic drugs. And most patients are unaware of the risks associated with taking the drugs. For that reason, we discuss it here, because staying knowledgeable is the best defense against injury or ill health. Continue reading

How to Protect Yourself from Hip Fractures

In a single year, as many as 350,000 Americans may find themselves suffering from a broken hip. It is estimated that, 90% of the time, these fractures are due to a fall. Residents in nursing homes seem particularly vulnerable. Up to 50% of residents fall each year(!).

In the past decade, companies have developed pads that can be worn on the hip. It was thought that these pads would offer enough cushioning to the hip to prevent a fracture. But, according to a new study performed at the Rehabilitation Studies Unit, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, the latest health news is that hip protectors don’t necessarily work.

The research team conducted a randomized, controlled trial with 234 participants.  Continue reading

Gradual Bone Reduction Seen in Some Pill Users

Changes in bone density in oral contraceptive users depends on age and hormone dose

Birth control pills may reduce a woman’s bone density, according to a study published online July 13 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism by Group Health Research Institute (GHRI) scientists. Impacts on bone were small, depended on the woman’s age and the pill’s hormone dose, and did not appear until about two years of use. The study size and design allowed the researchers to focus on 14- to 18-year-old teenagers, and to look at how bone density might change when a woman stops using the pill.

GHRI Senior Investigator Delia Scholes, PhD, led the study. Hormones are a key component of bone health, she says, and hormonal contraceptives are a major source of external hormones for women—the pill is the most common birth control method worldwide. A woman’s risk of fractures later in life is influenced by the bone mass she gains in her teens through her 20s, and this age group has the highest use of oral contraceptives. Continue reading