With Friends Like These

As Will Rogers once said, “I don’t make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts.”

And if those facts weren’t so infuriating, maybe they would be funny.

Consider the latest bad joke our own FDA is playing on us. They now consider a fruit eaten for millennia — Continue reading

It Takes a Village to Keep Teens Substance Free

During high school the parents of teenagers’ friends can have as much effect on the teens’ substance use as their own parents, according to prevention researchers.

“Among friendship groups with ‘good parents’ there’s a synergistic effect — if your parents are consistent Continue reading

Coping with Shift Work

Working the night or evening shift is tough: physically, mentally, and socially. Shift workers frequently suffer from several health problems including insomnia, obesity, indigestion, and a higher risk of heart disease, stroke, and hypertension. Continue reading

Indulge and Have Sex Once a Week

Couples often ask how frequently they should be having sex. There’s no right answer. After all, a couple’s sex life is affected by so many different factors: age, lifestyle, each partner’s health and natural libido and, of course, quality of their overall relationship to name just a few.

What might seem like too much sex to one person may seem like too little to another: (Remember that scene in Annie Hall, in which Woody Allen and Diane Keaton are discussing their sex life, split-screen, with their respective therapists? Asks Woody’s therapist, “How often do you sleep together?”  To which he responds: “Hardly ever. Maybe three times a week.” Meanwhile, Diane Keaton’s therapist is asking her the very same question, and she replies, “Constantly. I’d say three times a week.”)

Every couple has to find their own middle ground Dr. Gail Saltz, says: “If your sex drives are out of balance, Continue reading

20 Secret Signs of Addiction

Knowing whether someone you love has a problem with alcohol or drugs isn’t as straightforward as it sounds. Despite the stereotypes of the staggering drunk or the emaciated addict, most people who overuse alcohol and drugs become adept at disguising their behavior. Shame, embarrassment, and fear of consequences are powerful motivators. And in many cases, the person who’s drinking too much or using drugs doesn’t want to recognize or admit that he’s not in control of the situation.

14 Things Your Eyes Say About Your Health

Sadly, many times we don’t find out until a tragedy, such as a drunken driving accident or an overdose, has occurred. And then we’re left wondering why we didn’t spot the signs of addiction earlier. Knowing these 20 secret signs of addiction can help you prevent that from happening.

1. Quantity control Continue reading

When Your Office Buddy Becomes Your Boss

(BEVERLY HILLS) – You have lunch together every day, grab an occasional drink after work, and have gotten each other through work-related crises. So wouldn’t it be strange if your office buddy became your new boss?

It’s more likely to happen in the current economic environment as hiring freezes force companies to promote from within, says Stephen Viscusi, a New York-based author and career consultant.
Meanwhile, employees are more willing to accept a new title even if it means doing two jobs for the price of one.

Becoming your friend’s subordinate may not be easy, but chances are he or she will be counting on your loyalty, Viscusi said. Still, the dynamic of your friendship at work will inevitably change.
“You may not want peers in the same department to even know you have a personal relationship,” Viscusi said. “It can get very sticky.”
Viscusi gives these rules for dealing with a friend you are now reporting to:

— Remember this is now your boss, and he has his own job on the line. Don’t flaunt your friendship or ask for special favors.

— Congratulate him or her first, then ask what you can do to make the job easier and transition faster.

— Let your friend, now your superior, take the lead on what his priorities are: your friendship, or the role of being boss.

— Hand over a copy of your resume. This would, of course, apply if the person is not your friend. But, often we are at a company for a long time, and even friends may not remember our experience. Having an up-to-date resume at all times helps people understand how you have grown. In this case, your friend may know your children’s birthdays and that your mother-in-law is a pain, but he or she may not know you have two master’s degrees and experience managing a team.

— If you notice a change in your friendship and still need and like your job, accept the change. New friends are far easier to come by today than new jobs.