Oxidized Form of Vitamin A May Treat Bowel Diseases

CHINA – Here’s another reason why you should take your vitamins: A new research report suggests that retinoic acid could be a beneficial treatment for people suffering from ulcerative colitis and other irritable bowel diseases.

Researchers found that retinoic acid, he oxidized form of vitamin A, helps suppress out-of-control inflammation, which is a hallmark of active ulcerative colitis.

“Pharmaceutical strategies based on this research may offer a promising alternative to our current approaches of managing immune diseases including, IBD, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and so on,” said Aiping Bai, a researcher involved in the work at Nanchang University in Nanchang City, China.

To make this discovery, reported in the October print issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, Bai and colleagues conducted in-vitro studies with human tissue and in vivo studies in mice.

Both studies ultimately found that treatment with retinoic acid reduced the inflammation in the colon by increasing the _expression of FOXP3, a gene involved with immune system responses, as well as decreasing the _expression of IL-17, a cytokine believed to cause inflammation. Because many experts believe that IL-17 relates directly to the uncontrolled inflammation seen in ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel disease, the discovery that retinoic acid reduces IL-17’s ability to cause inflammation could accelerate the development of treatments for these chronic diseases.

“Runaway inflammation is serious problem, no matter where it occurs in the body, but in many instances, the root cause is a mystery,” said John Wherry, deputy editor of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. “This research helps scientists better understand what causes and controls inflammation in the colon, which in turn, helps lay the groundwork for new classes of drugs to treat this devastating condition.”

Vitamin D Helps Improve Survival From Bowel And Skin Cancer

LONDON – New research shows higher levels of vitamin D may help improve survival for both bowel and skin cancer patients*.

The results of two studies published in the British Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology found people with higher levels of vitamin D – at the time they were diagnosed – were more likely to survive.

In the first study researchers from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston followed 1017 bowel cancer patients for around nine years.

Using information about UV-B and sunlight exposure, skin type, body-mass index, and vitamin D intake from food and supplements they estimated the amount of vitamin D in patients’ blood at the time of diagnosis.

The results showed that those with higher vitamin D scores after being diagnosed with cancer were 50 per cent less likely to die from the disease – compared to those with lower vitamin D scores.

Professor Kimmie Ng, study author, said: “Our study shows that levels of vitamin D after colorectal cancer diagnosis may be important for survival. We are now planning further research in patients with bowel cancer to see if vitamin D has the same effect, and to investigate how vitamin D works with molecular and genetic pathways in the cell to fight cancer.”

The second study – funded by Cancer Research UK and the National Institutes of Health – found that malignant melanoma patients** with the lowest levels of vitamin D in their blood at the time they were diagnosed were 30 per cent more likely to relapse from the disease than those with the highest levels.

The researchers from Leeds also found that patients who have higher levels of vitamin D at diagnosis have thinner tumours at diagnosis.

Professor Julia Newton Bishop, study author at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, said: “It’s common for the general public to have low levels of vitamin D in many countries. Melanoma patients tend to avoid the sun as sunburn is known to increase the risk of melanoma. We use sunshine to make vitamin D in the skin, so melanoma patients’ levels of vitamin D may be especially low.

“Our results suggest that melanoma patients may need to get vitamin D by eating fatty fish or by taking supplements to ensure they have normal levels. But we are continuing to carry out research to find out the optimum level of vitamin D. There’s some evidence from other health studies that high levels of vitamin D are also harmful – so we should aim for a normal level rather than a very high one.”

Sara Hiom, director of health information at Cancer Research UK, said: “Both these studies support the theory that higher levels of vitamin D can improve the chance of surviving cancer. The key is to get the right balance between the amount of time spent in the sun and the levels of vitamin D needed for good health.

“But protection from burning in the sun is still vital. Cancer Research UK’s SunSmart campaign advises that people with lots of moles, red hair fair skin and a family history of the disease should take extra care in the sun as they are more at risk of the most dangerous form of skin cancer Anyone who is worried about changes in their moles should go to their GP.”

1 in 5 U.S. kids found deficient in vitamin D

1 in 5 U.S. kids found deficient in vitamin D

Chicago(AP) — At least 1 in 5 U.S. children ages 1 to 11 doesn’t get enough vitamin D and could be at risk for a variety of health problems including weak bones, the most recent national analysis suggests.

By a looser measure, almost 90 percent of black children that age and 80 percent of Latino kids could be vitamin D deficient – “astounding numbers” that should serve as a call to action, said Dr. Jonathan Mansbach, lead author of the new analysis and a researcher at Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital in Boston.

The deficiency is a concern because recent studies suggest the vitamin might help prevent infections, diabetes and some cancers.

The new analysis, released online today by the journal Pediatrics, is the first assessment of varying vitamin D levels in children ages 1 through 11. The study used data from a 2001-06 government health survey of almost 3,000 children who had blood tests measuring vitamin D.

Know the Difference between Cold and Swine Flu Symptoms

Know the Difference between Cold and Swine Flu Symptoms

 

Symptom

Cold

Swine Flu

Aches

Slight body aches and pains can be part of a cold.

Severe aches and pains are common with the flu.

Chills

Chills are uncommon with a cold.

60% of people who have the flu experience chills.

Tiredness

Tiredness is fairly mild with a cold.

Tiredness is moderate to severe with the flu.

Sneezing

Sneezing is commonly present with a cold.

Sneezing is not common with the flu.

Sudden Symptoms

Cold symptoms tend to develop over a few days.

The flu has a rapid onset within 3-6 hours. The flu hits hard and includes sudden symptoms like high fever, aches and pains.

Headache

A headache is fairly uncommon with a cold..

A headache is very common with the flu, present in 80% of flu cases.

Sore Throat

Sore throat is commonly present with a cold.

Sore throat is not commonly present with the flu.

Chest Discomfort

Chest discomfort is mild to moderate with a cold.

Chest discomfort is often severe with the flu.

 

Vitamin D may save your life from swine flu

Vitamin D may save your life from swine flu

People still don’t get it: Vitamin D is the “miracle nutrient” that activates your immune system to defend you against invading microorganisms — including seasonal flu and swine flu. Continue reading