Iron in Your Blood

Story at-a-glance

  • While iron is essential for human life, too much iron can cause heart disease      and cancer. This is actually far more common than iron deficiency
  • Checking your iron levels is one of the most important tests that everyone should have done on a regular basis as part of a preventive, Continue reading

Dangers of Chlorine in Your Shower

Can taking a shower really be dangerous? It may come as a shock, but the very method most people use to keep their bodies clean could be exposing them to unforeseen health risks.

While many people are aware of the dangers of drinking unfiltered water, few consider the risks of showering in unfiltered water. Continue reading

Learning Faster with Neurodegenerative Disease

Huntington’s gene mutation carriers: Severity of the genetic mutation related to learning efficiency

People who bear the genetic mutation for Huntington’s disease learn faster than healthy people. The more pronounced the mutation was, the more quickly they learned. This is reported by researchers from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum and from Dortmund in the journal Current Biology. Continue reading

Research Identifies Mechanism Responsible for Eye Movement Disorder

Discovery could lead to therapies for this condition, and a better understanding of how genetic mutations in the nervous system cause movement disorders in other parts of the body with a long term view to encouraging the re-growth of damaged cells

A research team from King’s College London and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified how a genetic mutation acts during the development of nerves responsible for controlling eye muscles, Continue reading

Genetic Mutation Makes Some People to Rid hepatitis C

A collaborative study led by Johns Hopkins researchers has uncovered a genetic mutation that gives a person the ability to get rid of Hepatitis C without any treatment.

While some of the people with Hepatitis C suffer throughout the life and develop serious liver disease, including cancer, others are able to defeat the infection and get rid of the virus with no treatment.

“If we knew why some people got rid of the disease on their own, then maybe we could figure out ways to help other people who didn’t. Or maybe even help prevent infections entirely,” Nature quoted Dr. David Thomas as saying.

In a previous study, researchers had found a variation in a single chemical of DNA, known as a single-nucleotide polymorphism, or SNP, near the IL28B gene, which while poorly understood, is thought to help the immune response to Hepatitis C viral infection.

People infected with Hepatitis C, who carried the C/C variation SNP near their IL28B gene, were found more likely to respond to hepatitis C treatment, which can rid some patients of the virus.

Thus, the researchers in the current study wondered if the C/C variation-as opposed to the C/T or T/T alternatives-also played a role in some peoples’ ability to get rid of the virus without the help of medication.

So, they assembled information from six different studies that had over many years collected DNA and Hepatitis C infection information from people all over the world.

Then, the team analysed DNA at the IL28B gene from a total of 1008 patients- 620 persistently infected and 388 who had been infected but no longer carried any virus.

DNA analysis revealed that of the 388 patients who no longer carried virus, 264 have the C/C variation.

“This is the strongest clue to date to understanding what would constitute a successful immune response. We don’t yet know the significance of this C variant, but we know we need to do more work to find out what it means and whether it might be helpful to halting the disease,” said Thomas.

The researchers also noticed an intriguing trend- the C/C variant does not appear equally in all populations.

“We wonder if this SNP also explains some of the genetic basis for the population difference of Hepatitis C clearance. It’s been reported that African-Americans are less