The Unhealthiest of “Health Foods”

Story at-a-glance

Many of the foods commonly considered to be “health foods” are not good for your health

Eleven of the most common unhealthy “health foods” are discussed—including fruit juices, whole grains, agave nectar, vegetable oil and sports drinks Continue reading

Say Goodbye to Gluten: Over 200 Clinically Confirmed Reasons to Avoid Wheat

This title is the same as a recent GreenMedInfo.com. It contains a list of over 200 health problems, with celiac disease at the top and including many more not normally associated with gluten intolerance.

The author and founder of GreenMedInfo.com, Sayer Ji, Continue reading

Today hybrid Versions of Grains Contain significantly more Gluten than Traditional Varieties

Over the past decade, the frequency of conversations about gluten intolerance (GI) and celiac disease (CD) in the United States has gone from almost unheard of to commonplace. Chances are your local supermarket sells dozens of items labeled “gluten free” where none existed five years ago. Restaurants and school lunch programs frequently offer gluten-free alternatives. What happened?

“Gluten” is the general term for a mixture of tiny protein fragments (called polypeptides), which are found in cereal grains such as wheat, rye, barley, spelt, faro, and kamut. Gluten is classified in two groups: prolamines and glutelins. The most troublesome component of gluten is the prolamine gliadin. Gliadin is the cause of the painful inflammation in gluten intolerance and instigates Continue reading

Is Gluten Making Us Fat?

Avoiding gluten has become big business. Sales of gluten-free products grew about 30 percent a year from 2006 to 2010, and will hit $3.9 billion by next year, according to the market research company Packaged Facts. Supermarket shelves are filled with gluten-free breads, soups, and cake mixes—even gluten-free ketchup and soy sauce. According to market research firm Mintel, 10 percent of new foods launched in 2010 featured a “gluten-free” claim, up from only 2 percent 5 years earlier.

NFL quarterback Drew Brees won a Super Bowl while on a gluten-free diet. Cyclist Tom Danielson, a record-breaking member of the Garmin-Transitions team, says his training and racing have improved since he and his teammates went gluten-free over a year ago.

Have most common whole grains been acting as insidious nutritional double agents all these years? Or are they essential components of a healthy diet? Let’s separate the wheat from the chaff. Continue reading