Americans who received swine flu vaccines are at risk for paralysis disorders

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The federal government has once again been exposed for lying about the safety of the infamous swine flu vaccine, also known as H1N1. According to a new study published in the journal The Lancet, people who received the swine flu vaccine during the 2009-2010 pandemic hoax were at an elevated risk of developing a potentially-deadly paralysis disorder known as Guillain-Barre syndrome, or GBS. Continue reading

Recovery from H1N1 Using High Doses of Vitamin C

Did You Know…

… that a common vitamin brought an Australian farmer back from the brink of death in a 1-in-a-BILLION recovery?

In King Country, New Zealand, a dairy farmer named Alan Smith earned himself the nickname Miracle Man due to his Continue reading

Astragalus

Did You Know…

… Flu vaccines could make you sicker—and there’s a great alternative the FDA doesn’t want you to know about?

Last week, Dr. Mercola shared a story from the Vancouver Sun on a frightening new research study about the flu vaccine.  Initial findings Continue reading

Institute of Medicine Safety Report Confirms Vaccine Dangers

For years natural health experts have been battling mainstream medical officials over the existence of vaccine dangers, but a new safety report by the Institute of Medicine settles the argument; they reveal that a relationship exists between vaccine use and adverse health effects. The comprehensive safety report released by the organization aimed to examine the side effects of vaccine use, and it ended up divulging information regarding vaccine side effects that most mainstream medical officials would have previously disregarded.

The statement by the IOM that a “relationship between certain vaccines and adverse health complications does exist” is monumental since it is coming from a mainstream medical organization Continue reading

Finnish Government to Cover Lifetime of Medical Costs for Children Permanently Injured by Swine Flu Vaccine

Back in September, officials from the National Narcolepsy Task Force in Finland determined that Pandemrix, an H1N1 / swine flu vaccine developed by drug giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), is responsible for causing narcolepsy in certain individuals, and particularly in children. In response, the Finnish government has agreed to cover any and all costs associated with treating the condition in affected children that go beyond what insurance companies are willing to pay.

The initial report determined that children who received Pandemrix, which was widely administered during the 2009 – 2010 swine flu scare, were nearly 13 times more likely to develop narcolepsy than children who did not receive the vaccine. The research team also found a link between Pandemrix and cataplexy, Continue reading

Scientists Deliberately Create 127 Hybrid Viruses from H1N1, then Warn they Are Dangerous

Chinese researchers recently warned the world in a study that the H1N1 virus is capable of combining with various other viruses to create “novel pandemic strains.” Published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, the paper states that with the proper mixing host in place, viruses can swap genes and mutate into new strains — and researchers discovered this by deliberately creating 127 of them in a laboratory.

After concocting these 127 hybrid viruses, researchers found that eight of them were more harmful than their parent viruses when tested in mice, according to a Reuters report. And researchers warn that these deadly mutant strains may one day be a serious threat to public health because they cause pneumonia, edema, and hemorrhaging. Continue reading

H1N1 Flu Prevention

There is growing concern for everyone’s health and safety as the H1N1 virus (swine flu)
becomes more widespread. Swine flu is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A
influenza viruses that causes regular outbreaks in pigs. Normally, people are not
affected by swine flu, but human infections can happen and as we have seen recently,
have happened.

H1N1 in particular is a unique combination of four different strains of
influenza, of which two strains are swine flu, one is an avian flu, and one is a human flu.
The symptoms of H1N1 flu include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache,
chills and fatigue. Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting, as well.
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) warn that people may be able to infect others
beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 7 or more days after becoming
sick. That means that the flu is contagious before you even know you are sick, as well as
while you are sick.

Our bodies are under constant attack from microbes, allergens and environmental
conditions, and it is the job of our immune system to serve as our protector or buffer
against these elements. Given the recent flu outbreak and with allergy season upon us,
supporting your immune system is more important than ever if you want to stay healthy.
The best way to strengthen your immune system is with a comprehensive approach that
involves healthy lifestyle practices, stress management, regular exercise, a healthy diet,
and nutritional supplementation.

The skin is the body’s first line of defense. Since many viruses are airborne, avoiding
them completely may be impossible because germs, viruses and bacteria live on
surfaces for a short time and can enter the body through the mucus membranes in the
mouth, nose and eyes. This is why it is important to wash your hands before touching
your face. Good health habits alone can be natural ways to boost the immune system or
at least prevent the immune system from having to work so hard.
Viruses can survive for several hours on hands, tissues, or hard surfaces. A healthy
person can contract a virus by touching a contaminated surface and then touching his or
her own mouth or nose. Using an antibiotic soap may help prevent the spreading of
germs, but these soaps can also contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant
bacteria, so it is best to use them only when necessary.

Your immune system is greatly impacted by your dietary habits and nutritional status.
Dietary factors that depress immune function include nutrient deficiencies, excess
consumption of sugar and unhealthy fats, and the consumption of allergenic foods.
Sugar can significantly reduce the ability of white blood cells to destroy foreign particles
and microorganisms. The negative effects start within 30 minutes and last for over 5
hours.

Optimal immune function requires a healthy diet that is rich in whole, natural foods –
such as fruits, vegetables, grains, beans, seeds, and nuts – low in bad fats and refined
sugars, contains adequate protein levels, and plenty of water and other fluids (soups,
herb teas). Fresh, nourishing foods are great for your immune system. Think salads,
soups and stews. Yogurt also provides important beneficial bacteria that helps to keep
your digestive system and immune system healthy.

Core Nutrition
Nutritional deficiencies are the most frequent cause of a depressed immune system.
Therefore, we recommend that everyone incorporate the following 5 key supplements
into their daily routine to build a solid foundation.

1. Multivitamin
Unfortunately, even the best diet cannot protect you from nutrient deficiencies.
Stress, poor food choices, and illnesses can further deplete your body of
important nutrients. Support your body by giving it the nutrients it needs in order
to function at its best. A good multivitamin provides a broad range of vitamins
and minerals to fill in nutrient gaps in your diet and protect against nutrient
deficiencies.
2. Essential Fatty Acids (Omega-3 and Omega-6)
Healthy fats are necessary for good health, have anti-inflammatory properties,
and cannot be manufactured by the body. EFAs support hormone balance,
cardiovascular, reproductive, joint, brain, immune, and nervous system health.
3. Antioxidants
Antioxidants are natural compounds that protect the body from harmful free
radicals and play a role in disease prevention. Antioxidants protect the body’s
tissues against stress and inflammation and enhance immune function.
4. Probiotics
A healthy immune system begins in the gastrointestinal tract. In fact, the
digestive system produces up to 75 percent of the immune system’s cells.
Beneficial bacteria is vital for digestion, preventing the overgrowth of yeast and
other pathogens, and for manufacturing B-complex vitamins and vitamin K.
5. Vitamin D
Beyond its role in bone health, new research shows that vitamin D3 also
improves immune function and can reduce the risk of some cancers, including
breast cancer, prostate cancer, and colon cancer. Vitamin D also seems to play a
role in cold and flu prevention.
It is estimated that over 70% of Americans are deficient in Vitamin D. And, during
the fall and winter months when sunshine is less available, your vitamin D levels
fall to their lowest point. Vitamin D regulates the expression of more than 1,000
genes throughout the body, including genes contained in macrophages, immune
system cells that attack and destroy viruses. Vitamin D “switches on” genes in
macrophages that make antimicrobial peptides, natural antibiotics that the body
produces. Like antibiotics, these peptides attack and destroy bacteria; but unlike
antibiotics, they also attack and destroy viruses.
Beyond Core Nutrition
A healthy lifestyle goes a long way toward establishing a healthy immune system.
Factors that increase immunity include: not smoking, increasing your intake of green
vegetables, eating regular meals, maintaining a proper body weight, getting more than 7
hours of sleep, and exercising regularly.
Stress/Sleep
While short-term stress – such as playing sports, experiencing stage-fright, or dealing
with an immediate threat – is a temporary natural immune system enhancer, numerous
studies have shown that chronic stress reduces immune activity. Those who deal with
chronic stress, such as a high-pressure job or a troubled relationship, typically have
lower-than-average white blood cell counts.
Sleep
Good sleep is very important to a healthy immune system. During deep sleep, immuneenhancing
compounds are released, and many immune functions are greatly increased.
Aim for a minimum of 7 hours of sleep nightly.
Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Getting Sick
1. SCRUB. Wash your hands with soap for at least 30 seconds – and wash them
often. If you can’t wash, then use a hand sanitizer. Use sanitary wipes to clean
phone mouthpieces, door knobs, computer keyboards, and other hands-on
surfaces.
2. COVER. Don’t cough or sneeze into your hands, where germs will be spread
onto everything you touch. Instead, use a tissue or the crook of your elbow.
3. HANDS OFF. Don’t touch your face. Cold and flu viruses enter your body
through the eyes, nose, or mouth. If you travel or are exposed to lots of people,
you may increase your resistance by using throat sprays and zinc lozenges.
4. FLOSS. What does flossing have to do with virus prevention? Plenty. Over 300
species of bacteria live in your mouth, and viruses use bacteria as “factories” to
grow and multiply. So be sure to floss at least once and brush at least twice daily,
and give those viruses fewer options.
5. EAT RIGHT. Cut down on sugar and eat more fruits and vegetables to boost
your immune system. If you should get infected with a cold or flu, you’ll be in
better condition to help fend it off or shorten its stay.
6. DRINK WATER. Drinking plenty of water helps flush out toxins and keeps you
hydrated.
7. WORK OUT. Aerobic exercise speeds up the heart, helps transfer oxygen from
your lungs to your blood, and makes you sweat – all of which can help increase
the body’s natural virus-defending abilities.
8. QUIT SMOKING. Statistics show that heavy smokers get more severe colds and
more frequent ones.
9. SUPPLEMENT. Key vitamins, minerals, and herbs can help to keep your
immune system strong so that you can fight off infections. A comprehensive
formula such as Pathway Immune System Support is designed to strengthen
your defenses. We also recommend supplementing with extra vitamin C and
vitamin D.
Copyright Village Green 2009

Swine Flu Jab Linked to Rare Nerve Disease

LONDON – There may be a possible link between the swine flu jab and an increased risk of developing a rare nerve disease, admit health watchdogs.

Experts are carrying out studies to examine a possible link between the vaccine and Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS), which attacks the nervous system and can cause paralysis and even death.

Authorities have always denied any link although it had been suspected that a previous swine flu vaccine had caused the disease in the US in the 1970s.

Now the Medicines and Health care products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has published a report that suggests that further tests are to be carried out, reports the Telegraph.

It reads: “Given the uncertainties in the available information and as with seasonal flu vaccines, a slightly elevated risk of GBS following H1N1 vaccines cannot be ruled out.”

It is not known precisely what causes GBS but the condition attacks the lining of the nerves, leaving them unable to transmit signals to muscles effectively.

It can cause partial paralysis and mostly affects the hands and feet – but it can be fatal if it paralyses the respiratory system.

A vaccine used to combat a different form of swine flu in the US in 1976 led to 25 deaths from the condition, compared with just one death from swine flu itself.

The MHRA had 15 suspected GBS cases after vaccination – and six million doses of the swine flu jab Pandemrix were given.

Milk During Pregnancy May Lower a Baby’s Risk of Developing MS Later in Life

Recent media reports have covered research announced ahead of the American Academy of Neurology’s (AAN) Annual Meeting in April which suggested that milk during pregnancy may lower a baby’s risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life.

The theory from the researchers in Boston, announced in an AAN press release, was based on a survey of American mothers.

It was claimed that MS risk was lower among women born to mothers with high milk or dietary vitamin D intake in pregnancy.

Unfortunately UK media reports focused on the milk link ; however it is in fact the case that there are only trace elements of vitamin D in milk consumed in this country.

Unlike America, most of Britain’s milk is not fortified with vitamin D and so whatever quantity of milk is ingested, vitamin D levels in the body are likely to remain unaffected.

While it may be true that vitamin D has previously been shown to potentially play a role in MS, maintaining a healthy, balanced diet including oily fish and exposing skin to safe levels of sunshine are the best ways to increase levels of vitamin D.

No Need for Pregnant Women to Fast During Labor

No Need for Pregnant Women to Fast During Labor

DETROIT –  There is no reason why pregnant women at low risk for complications during delivery should be denied fluids and food during labor, a new Cochrane research review concludes.

“Women should be free to eat and drink in labour, or not, as they wish,” the authors of the review wrote in the Cochrane Library, a publication of the Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that evaluates medical research.

Dr. Jennifer Milosavljevic, a specialist in obstetrics and gynecology at Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, who was not involved in the Cochrane Review, agrees that pregnant women should be allowed to eat and/or drink during labor.

“In my experience,” she told Reuters Health in an email, “most pregnant patients at Henry Ford are placed on a clear liquid diet during labor which includes water, apple juice, cranberry juice, broth, and jello. If a patient is brought in for a prolonged induction of labor, she will typically be permitted to eat a regular diet and order anything off the menu in between different induction modalities.”

Milosavlievic has “not seen any adverse outcomes by allowing women the option of liquids and/or a regular diet in labor.”

Standard hospital policy for many decades has been to allow only tiny sips of water or ice chips for pregnant women in labor if they were thirsty. Why? It was feared, and some studies in the 1940s showed, that if a woman needed to undergo general anesthesia for a cesarean delivery, she might inhale regurgitated liquids or food particles that could lead to pneumonia and other lung damage.

But anesthesia practices have changed and improved since the 1940s, with more use of regional anesthesia and safer general anesthesia.

And recently, attitudes on food and drink during labor have begun to relax. Last September, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) released a “Committee Opinion” advising doctors that women with a normal, uncomplicated labor may drink modest amounts of clear liquids such as water, fruit juice without pulp, carbonated beverages, clear tea, black coffee, and sports drinks. They fell short of saying food was okay, however, advising that women should avoid fluids with solid particles, such as soup.

“As for the continued restriction on food, the reality is that eating is the last thing most women are going to want to do since nausea and vomiting during labor is quite common,” Dr. William H. Barth, Jr., chair of ACOGs Committee on Obstetric Practice, noted in a written statement at the time.

But based on the evidence, Mandisa Singata of the East London Hospital Complex in East London, South Africa, an author on the new Cochrane Review, says “women should be able to make their own decisions about whether they want to eat or drink during labour, or not.”

Singata and colleagues systematically reviewed five studies involving more than 3100 pregnant that looked at the evidence for restricting food and drink in women who were considered unlikely to need anesthesia. One study looked at complete restriction versus giving women the freedom to eat and drink at will; two studies looked at water only versus giving women specific fluids and foods and two studies looked at water only versus giving women carbohydrate drinks.

The evidence showed no benefits or harms of restricting foods and fluids during labor in women at low risk of needing anesthesia.

Singata and colleagues acknowledge that many women may not feel like eating or drinking during labor. However, research has shown that some women find the food and drink restriction unpleasant. Poor nutritional balance may be also associated with longer and more painful labors. Drinking clear liquids in limited quantities has been found to bring comfort to women in labor and does not increase labor complications.

The researchers emphasize that they did not find any studies that assessed the risks of eating and drinking for women with a higher risk of needing anesthesia and so further research is need before specific recommendations can be made for this group.

SOURCE: Cochrane Library, 2010.

 

Cola Drinking Linked to Diabetes in Pregnancy

NEW ORLEANS – Drinking lots of sugar-sweetened cola may increase women’s likelihood of developing diabetes during pregnancy, a condition known as gestational diabetes, new research shows.

Compared to women who had less than one such beverage a month, women who drank at least five servings of non-diet cola a week were at greater risk of gestational diabetes, even after accounting for their body mass index (BMI), level of physical activity, and other diabetes risk factors, researchers found.

Sugar-sweetened beverages are the top source of added sugar in US diets, and several studies have linked high sugary drink intake with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women, Dr. Liwei Chen of the Louisiana State University Health Science Center in New Orleans and colleagues note in the latest edition of the journal Diabetes Care.

But there is little information on whether consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages before pregnancy might increase gestational diabetes risk, they add.

To investigate, the researchers analyzed data from the Nurses Health Study II, looking at 13, 475 women who had at least one pregnancy between 1992 and 2001. During that time, 860 women reported having been diagnosed with gestational diabetes for the first time.

Women who drank five or more sugar-sweetened beverages of any type per week were 23 percent more likely to develop gestational diabetes than those who drank less than one serving a month, and the relationship remained even after the researchers accounted for other gestational diabetes risk factors such as BMI and family history of diabetes.

But accounting for a Western-style diet — heavy in red meats, processed meats, sweets, snacks and other less-healthy foods — did explain some of the association between diabetes and sugary drinks.

The researchers looked separately at cola beverages, because the caramel coloring used in them has been linked in animal studies to insulin resistance and inflammation. They found a 22 percent increased risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy for women who drank five or more non-diet colas a week, compared to women who had less than one serving of cola a month.

There was no relationship between diet beverage consumption and gestational diabetes risk.

The demands pregnancy puts on a woman’s metabolism may “unmask” a tendency toward developing diabetes and similar conditions, Chen and colleagues note. Drinking cola could contribute to this tendency by making for a sugar-filled diet, they add, which in and of itself may be harmful to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas.

Because diet cola didn’t increase gestational diabetes risk, they add, caramel coloring isn’t likely to be a major factor in the relationship observed with non-diet cola.

The findings “are particularly relevant” given that so many people drink sugar-sweetened cola, the researchers write. They call for more research on sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and gestational diabetes, as well as other pregnancy outcomes.

SOURCE: Diabetes Care, December 2009.

 

Brain Prods You Into Gorging on Good Food

AUSTIN – The brain prods you into splurging on an extra ice-cream scoop or that second burger, practically sabotaging your efforts to get back into shape, a new study says.

Findings from a new University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre (UTSMC) study suggest that fat from certain foods we eat makes its way to the brain.

There, these fat molecules cause the brain to send messages to the body’s cells, directing them to ignore the appetite-suppressing signals from leptin and insulin, hormones involved in weight regulation.

Researchers also found that one particular type of fat — palmitic acid — is particularly effective at instigating this mechanism. It is a common saturated fatty acid, occurring in butter, cheese, milk and beef.

“Normally, our body is primed to say when we’ve had enough, but that doesn’t always happen when we’re eating something good,” said Deborah Clegg, assistant professor of internal medicine at UTSMC. Clegg led the study on rodents.

“What we’ve shown in this study is that someone’s entire brain chemistry can change in a very short period of time.”

“When you eat something high in fat, your brain gets ‘hit’ with the fatty acids, and you become resistant to insulin and leptin,” Clegg said. “Since you’re not being told by the brain to stop eating, you overeat.”

In animals, the effect lasts about three days, potentially explaining why many people who splurge on Friday or Saturday say they’re hungrier than normal on Monday, added Clegg.

Clegg said that even though the findings are in animals, they reinforce the common dietary recommendation that individuals limit their saturated fat intake. “It causes you to eat more,” she said, according to an UTSMC release.

The next step, Clegg averred, is to determine how long it takes to reverse completely the effects of short-term exposure to high-fat food.

The study appeared in the September issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Swine Flu Prompts Calls for Kissing Strike in Spain

MADRID – H1N1 influenza is prompting tough health measures around the globe, but could it go as far as forcing a “kissing strike” in traditionally affectionate Spain?

The health authorities are recommending that Spaniards no longer greet each other with the usual kiss on both cheeks. But many people say kissing is so important they are willing to risk catching the disease, popularly known as swine flu.

“What would people think if I refused to return their kisses?” exclaims Maria, 40. “I am so used to it, I could not stop doing it.”

Even Health Minister Trinidad Jimenez herself has been seen greeting officials with kisses, despite the warnings issued by her ministry.

As in some other Mediterranean countries, Spanish women and even male relatives or friends greet each other with kisses or at least with gestures of kissing on the cheeks.

Spanish people generally like touching each other, for instance placing their hand around the shoulder or their hand on the hand of the person they are talking to.

However, kisses and hugs are among the most effective ways of spreading H1N1, experts warn in the country where swine flu has killed around 20 people, one of the highest rates in Europe.

The health ministry is planning to vaccinate people with chronic diseases, health and some other professionals, pregnant women and other vulnerable groups. There will be sufficient vaccines for up to 60 percent of the population.

Above all, however, the authorities intend to focus on information campaigns advising people to avoid habits that could spread the virus.

“Do not kiss, do not shake hands, just say hi,” the Madrid city council recommended in a placard it placed on a wall of the city hall.

“Getting used to limiting close contact diminishes the risk of transmission (of the virus),” Juan Jose Rodriguez Sendin, president of a doctors’ organisation, told the daily El Pais.

The Catholic Church has heeded the warning, recommending to believers that they refrain from kissing statues of the Virgin Mary during religious celebrations.

During religious services where Catholics eat a small wafer of bread, some priests have also begun placing the wafer in the hand of the communicant. Traditionally, priests placed it directly in the mouth of the person.

Some churches have emptied fonts of holy water to prevent the virus from spreading if an infected person dips a hand in the font.

Prior to the appearance of swine flu, the custom of kissing the cheeks had become a little less common. Some sociologists say that was possibly because of the influence of the colder and physically more distant US culture.

Kissing has often not been replaced with the handshake typical of US or northern European cultures, observed Irene, a Madrid civil servant.

“Some people no longer touch each other at all when meeting, just nodding at each other,” she said.

That would be ideal for fighting H1N1, but experts doubt whether most Spaniards can change their ways, and concede that they would have a lot to lose if they did.

There is an abundance of scientific studies proving what nearly every human being instinctively knows: that touching is good for us.

It increases self-confidence, lowers arterial pressure, makes people more sociable and less aggressive, studies show.

“It is very unlikely that we will forget kissing,” El Pais concluded.

“Dung of the Devil” Plant Roots may Offer Swine Flu Cure

BEIJING – Chinese scientists have found that the roots of a plant have powerful natural substances that can kill the H1N1 virus.

Researchers Fang-Rong Chang and Yang-Chang Wu identified chemicals in the extracts of the “Dung of the Devil” plant, which were more effective against the H1N1 virus than the antiviral drug currently available for the flu.

The report was published in the Sept. 25 issue of ACS’ Journal of Natural Products.

The plant biologically called ferula assa-foetida, is found in Iran, Afghanistan and mainland China.

The authors say: “Overall, the present study has determined that sesquiterpene coumarins from F. assa-foetida may serve as promising lead components for new drug development against influenza A (H1N1) viral infection.”

The plant was also used as a remedy during the1918 Spanish flu that took a toll of nearly 100 million lives.

However, the antiviral capacity of the plant was not fully confirmed until now.

1 in 5 U.S. kids found deficient in vitamin D

1 in 5 U.S. kids found deficient in vitamin D

Chicago(AP) — At least 1 in 5 U.S. children ages 1 to 11 doesn’t get enough vitamin D and could be at risk for a variety of health problems including weak bones, the most recent national analysis suggests.

By a looser measure, almost 90 percent of black children that age and 80 percent of Latino kids could be vitamin D deficient – “astounding numbers” that should serve as a call to action, said Dr. Jonathan Mansbach, lead author of the new analysis and a researcher at Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital in Boston.

The deficiency is a concern because recent studies suggest the vitamin might help prevent infections, diabetes and some cancers.

The new analysis, released online today by the journal Pediatrics, is the first assessment of varying vitamin D levels in children ages 1 through 11. The study used data from a 2001-06 government health survey of almost 3,000 children who had blood tests measuring vitamin D.