Study warns US farmland is now 48 TIMES more TOXIC to insects: Are neonicotinoids to blame for the impending “insect apocalypse?”

Researchers have determined that the nation’s farmland is now 48 times more toxic to insects than it was just 25 years ago, and much of this rise in toxicity is being blamed on the widespread use of a dangerous category of pesticides known as neonicotinoids. Continue reading

Home gardening tips: Boost garden yields with double digging

Many people have taken up gardening both as a hobby and a way of sustaining their food supply. If you have a wide enough backyard, there are plenty of crops you can grow. Those who are living in packed cities, however, have done away with row gardening because of lack of space and opted for container gardening. Continue reading

Researchers warn about the ecological disaster headed for humanity because of our overuse of pesticides

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Home gardening tips: For how long can you store vegetable seeds?

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How to Harvest and Prepare Rose Hips for Maximum Health Benefits

Rose hips are the small, colorful bulbs that stay behind when a rose dies. They are roughly the same size as berries and vary in color from orange to red. Oftentimes overlooked because gardeners trim the dead flowers before the rose hips can form, rose hips are a great source of Vitamin C and can be harvested and prepared as a natural way to boost intake of this important vitamin.

With a sweet tartness, rose hips are part of the apple and crabapple families. Almost all roses create rose hips, as they are the natural product of a dead flower, but the ones that are said by many to be the best tasting are rugosa roses. In addition to tasting the best; these roses also produce the largest and most numerous hips.

Harvesting rose hips is very straightforward. Continue reading

The Health Benefits of Gingko Nuts

October winds mark the beginning of 45 days of harvesting those odiferous, nutritious, delicious ginkgo nuts. Notorious for its stinky fruit which is discarded, the ginkgo nut itself contains potassium, phosphorus, folate and vitamin A, with traces of zinc, copper and manganese. After cooking, the rubbery jade-green nut tastes very similar to edamame (young soy bean pods) with a hint of that unique ginkgo fragrance.

The health benefits of the ginkgo nut make it worth the effort. The nuts have similar health properties as the leaves, but caution must be used if any allergies to tree nuts exist. The recommended “dosage” of nuts is six to ten daily. With antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator properties, Ginkgo is recommended for a variety of ailments, particularly those concerning circulation, heart and lungs. Continue reading