Fact or Myth: Is Chronic Pain Just In Your Head?

This is a FACT.

Relief from chronic pain seems to be out of reach for many. Doctors are looking at the mechanics of chronic pain – what causes it and why – and have determined that the pain response may very well be linked to how your brain is processing pain.

How Chronic Pain Works Continue reading

Read Body Language with the Help of Mirror Neurons

 How Do Mirror Neurons Work?

 When you see a basketball player setting up to shoot, your brain relates to the movement – your body doesn’t mimic the action, but you know exactly what is going to happen next – that’s how mirror neurons work. Continue reading

The Alexander Technique

Did You Know…

… that a unique and practical method of moment called the Alexander Technique has been shown to help alleviate tension headaches naturally, as well as ease back pain, tennis elbow—and even asthma, sleep disorders and lethargy?

If you watch toddlers playing, you will notice that they move with ease: spines straight, joints free and large heads balanced easily on their small necks.  It doesn’t take long, however, before unawareness settles in, and the body’s innate ability to move Continue reading

This Exercise Mistake Can Give You a Heart Attack

Many people wonder whether it is safe to exercise outdoors during cold weather, especially below freezing.

As a general rule, it is; but you do want to make sure you take certain precautions, and pay attention to signs and symptoms of specific cold-weather dangers.

Additionally, there are likely better and safer options than exercising outdoors during very cold temperatures.

Three primary dangers of cold weather exercise are: Continue reading

Study Finds Anxiety Begins in your Gut and not Head

We’re all familiar with the term “gut feeling”. As it turns out, the term may be more apt than we realize. In recent years, research has increasingly identified the role the gut can have on mood and behavior, leading many scientists to refer to the gut as the “second brain”. Now, for the first time, researchers have found conclusive evidence that conditions such as anxiety can originate in the gut instead of the brain.

In a study just published in the journal Gastroenterology, researchers at McMaster University found that bacteria residing in the gut influence brain chemistry and behavior. The research is important because several common types of gastrointestinal disease are frequently associated with anxiety or depression. In addition there has been speculation that some psychiatric disorders Continue reading

Patience Can Prevent Needless Exposure to Children from Cancer Linked Radiation

Are you a parent? Here’s a simple question to ask yourself: if your youngster receives a bump on the head, would you rather keep an eye on your child for 4 to 6 hours to make sure he or she suffered no serious trauma — or would you prefer that doctors zap your child’s brain with ionizing radiation from costly computed tomography (CT) scans just to make you feel better immediately?

Most moms and dads would probably prefer the simple “watchful waiting” approach if they thought there was little chance their offspring had serious head trauma. And it turns out, according to a huge study of more than 40,000 kids with blunt head trauma just published online in the journal Pediatrics, simple observation is the best approach and also the healthiest — because it doesn’t expose children to ionizing radiation.

So why do about half of all US children taken to hospital emergency departments (EDs) for a head injury receive a head CT scan? Remarkably, the scientists behind the new research claim it is “often to ease worried parents’ concerns”. Simply put, parents are blamed for the outrageously common practice of exposing children needlessly to radiation for a bump on the head. Continue reading

An increase in Prevalence of Flattened Head Found in Infants and young Children

The prevalence of plagiocephaly, a condition marked by an asymmetrical, flattening of the skull, appears to be increasing in infants and young children, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the August issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

“Plagiocephaly is characterized by unilateral flattening of the head either in the frontal or occipital [rear] region,” the authors write as background information in the study. “The presence of plagiocephaly has reportedly increased since 1992 while the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended that infants be put to sleep on their back to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome,  Continue reading

Head and Neck Cancer Study Marijuana us at Brown University

Researchers at the Departments of Community Health, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA, have found that Cannabinoids, constituents of marijuana smoke, have been recognized to have potential antitumor properties. They wrote, “However, for the subjects who have the same level of smoking or alcohol drinking, we observed attenuated risk of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma ) among those who use marijuana compared with those who do not. Our study suggests that moderate marijuana use is associated with reduced risk.