Top 5 Reasons NEVER to Take a Proton Pump Inhibitor

Millions of doses of “acid blocking” proton pump inhibitor drugs are doled out every year, yet most doctors and their patients are completely oblivious to their unintended, adverse effects, which include increased risk for premature death.  Continue reading

Mango Man’s Avocado Supreme Salad Recipe

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Improper food combining is one of the primary factors that cause gas, flatulence, heartburn, and upset stomach

Avocado Supreme Salad recipe is not only loaded with antioxidant-, Continue reading

11 Amazing Health Benefits of Using Baking Soda

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Baking soda can be used to remove plaque and odors from your teeth and also promotes whitening

Continue reading

15 Natural Remedies for the Treatment of Acid Reflux and Ulcers

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Acid reflux affects an estimated 50 percent of Americans. The hallmark symptom of acid reflux is “heartburn”—a burning sensation behind your breastbone that sometimes travels up your throat Continue reading

15 Natural Remedies for the Treatment of Acid Reflux and Ulcers

Story at-a-glance 

Acid reflux affects an estimated 50 percent of Americans. The hallmark symptom of acid reflux is “heartburn”—a burning sensation behind your breastbone that sometimes travels up your throat Continue reading

How to Combine Foods for Optimal Health

Story at-a-glance

Improper food combining is one of the primary factors that cause gas, flatulence, heartburn, and upset stomach. What’s worse, the resulting poor digestion can also contribute to malnutrition, even if you think you’re eating a decent diet

Disease is just as much Continue reading

Why a Healthy Digestive Tract is an Important Key to Longevity and the Prevention of Disease

More than 100 million Americans experience digestive problems.  But most people don’t know that digestive imbalances can severely damage one’s health.

One clue to what “normal” digestion looks like … can be found by observing primitive people living in rural, non-industrialized regions—those who live simple lives, and who have simple, natural diets.  These people have been observed to have one bowel movement within 20 to 30 minutes after eating a major meal—and they average 2 to 4 bowel movements a day!

If you’ve been told that having one bowel movement a day was a good sign of healthy digestion, that is erroneous information that is hazardous to your health.  Continue reading

DIY Home Remedies and Old Wives Cures Using Baking Soda

 In a world awash with pharmaceutical drugs for everything from dandruff to toenail fungus, it’s refreshing to have do-it-yourself home remedies and trusted old wives cures to heal a wide range of ailments. Baking soda is a staple in most homes and is useful for cooking, cleaning and in many home remedies. Although it’s safe when used as directed, baking soda can cause side effects. Read the warning section below and check with your healthcare practitioner before using baking soda home remedies.

Old wives cures Continue reading

The Many Healing Benefits of Bananas

Bananas contain three natural sugars – sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy.

Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world’s leading athletes.

But energy isn’t the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet. Continue reading

Taking the Burn Out of Heartburn Naturally

According to the National Institute of Health, approximately 25 million Americans are suffering from heartburn each year. With such a large number of the population afflicted with this painful and potentially dangerous health problem, chances are that you are represented in this statistic. Over the past decade pharmaceutical companies have lead us to believe that the cause of this heartburn epidemic is an overproduction of stomach acid and doctors are writing millions of “acid blocker” prescriptions each year aimed at easing the symptoms of acid reflux. Ironically however, low stomach acid levels, not excessive levels, may very well be causing your heartburn. And furthermore, the very act of “blocking” your stomach acid production can have disastrous consequences for your health down the road.

Acid reflux is often incorrectly thought of as a stomach acid disease, but actually it is the result of a malfunctioning muscle called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The LES is a flap that separates the base of the esophagus from the top of the stomach and opens only to allow food and liquids to pass down or vomit or gas to pass up. When the LES is functioning properly it will remain closed at all other times, sealing off the esophagus from the harmful acids in the stomach. When the LES is malfunctioning however, the corrosive stomach acids are able to make their way into the esophagus where they burn  Continue reading

Five simple Solutions to Prolong Sleep

Does the question “How’d you sleep?” make you want to scream?  Here are the five most common types of middle-of-the-night sleep problems, and what to do about them.

Problem #1: You’re awake for no reason, with your mind spinning.

Middle-of-the-night worrying is probably the number-one type of sleeplessness faced by people of all ages. It is very frustrating. You know you need to relax and get back to sleep, but anxious thoughts and to-do list items keep popping into your head.

What to do

1. Preserve the darkness. Keep the room dark when you wake up. Keep a small book light or mini flashlight next to your bed and use it to navigate your  Continue reading

Easy At-Home Remedies for Your Digestive Problems

Picture this: A hot, heavy bowl of chili on a harsh winter’s day. Or this: A two-scoop cone of ice cream melting in the summer’s sun.

Do those images evoke desire or dread? Or both?

The truth is, it’s hard to enjoy a hearty dinner or a sweet treat when you’re worried about the discomfort or pain that may follow. There are a number of different problems that can affect the digestive system.

Three of the most common problems are heartburn/gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD; irritable bowel syndrome; and inflammatory bowel disease — all of which cause millions of Americans to suffer every day. However, by following a few simple rules, it is possible to reduce or even eliminate some of the symptoms that accompany one of life’s greatest joys – food.

Heartburn/GERD

Heartburn is a burning discomfort from the chest up to the throat that affects about one in every 10 Americans. One of the causes of heartburn is acid reflux, which is when stomach acid flows up through the lower esophageal sphincter and irritates the esophagus.

To prevent the burn, here are a few tips you can try:

1. Eat smaller portions of food

No matter what the food is, too much at once can put you in danger of a flare up. Also, try to eat food slower. Grabbing your meals on the go and wolfing them down leads to poor digestion and a greater risk of GERD symptoms.

2. Baking, broiling, grilling or roasting are all better alternatives than frying.

Also, make sure to cut off the fatty parts if you can. Foods that are high in fat sit in the stomach longer, which can cause discomfort.

3. In some cases, it’s best to just avoid certain foods altogether.

If you’re a frequent heartburn sufferer, spicy foods or foods that are highly acidic are probably not for you, especially on an empty stomach. Particularly acidic foods include tomatoes, citrus fruits and vinegar. If you’re really craving one of these foods, include a decent amount of other, less acidic foods like meat or vegetables as part of your meal.

4. Drinks can cause bloating and irritation too.

Stay away from caffeine and carbonation, as well as excess alcohol.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder characterized by abdominal pain, cramping and changes in bowel movements. Symptoms can range from mild to severe but are present for at least six months. They will often occur after meals, come and go, and be reduced or eliminated after a bowel movement. Sometimes, people with IBS will also suffer from diarrhea or constipation.

Normally, lifestyle changes are the most effective ways to cope with IBS. Here are a few of the more effective changes you can make:

1. As with heartburn, avoid large meals and eating too fast.

Foods that tend to aggravate IBS include wheat, rye, barley, beans, cabbage, some fruits, chocolate, alcohol, milk and caffeinated beverages.

2. Add more fiber to your diet.

Fiber helps regulate diarrhea and constipation. Soluble fiber, in particular, can be very effective. Foods high in soluble fiber include apples, beans and citrus fruits. Don’t try to cheat with fiber supplements – these can actually make symptoms worse.

3. Try to de-stress, in whatever way possible.

Anxiety has been linked with IBS. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep at night, and if possible, try to clear a little time in your day to relax and enjoy yourself. Some people claim that therapy can help with IBS symptoms.

4. Exercise.

Studies show that people who weigh less and are more physically fit report less abdominal pain than those who are heavier. Also, for a lot of people, exercise is a great way to reduce stress.

5. Are you lactose intolerant?

If milk and other dairy products bother you, you may have lactose intolerance. This means that your body is unable to digest the sugar in milk. If you suspect you are lactose intolerant, limit the amount of dairy products in your diet, and talk to your doctor.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition that causes inflammation in the intestines. The intestinal walls swell and occasionally develop ulcers, which can lead to discomfort and serious digestive problems. There are different types of IBD, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Symptoms include abdominal pain, cramping, diarrhea, bloody stools and weight loss.

IBD is more serious than IBS and should be treated by a doctor. There is a high risk of complications, such as obstruction, abscesses or fistulas, which all may require surgery. Also, people who have had IBD for at least eight years have a greater likelihood of developing colon cancer.

Beyond any medications or treatments your doctor prescribes, here are at-home tips to alleviate symptoms of IBD:

1. Be aware of trigger foods.

IBD symptoms can be triggered by a wide range of foods including: alcohol, coffee, soda, spicy foods, beans, fatty foods, high-fiber foods, nuts and seeds, raw fruits and vegetables, red meat, and dairy products. Low-residue diets (which eliminate nuts, seeds, raw fruits, and raw vegetables) can alleviate pain associated with Crohn’s disease.

2. Eat a well-balanced diet with smaller meals distributed more frequently across the day.

People with IBD can have trouble absorbing nutrients from foods. Couple that with a poor appetite due to abdominal pain, and you may be at risk of malnutrition. Smaller, healthier meals help the body absorb more nutrients. You doctor may also suggest vitamin and mineral supplements. Make sure to drink lots of water to avoid dehydration.

3. Engage in light exercise.

Activities like yoga, tai chi, or walking are recommended for people suffering from IBD. These activities can aid digestion and reduce stress, which eases abdominal pain. More strenuous exercises, however, can jar the body and make symptoms worse.

4. Look out for other symptoms.

Not all symptoms of IBD occur inside the digestive tract. Consult your doctor if you experience mouth sores, arthritis or vision problems.

Remember, these tips aren’t “one size fits all.” It’s a good idea to keep a log of what you eat and when it upsets you. Eventually, you should see a pattern that will indicate which foods and drinks you should avoid. Also, make note whenever you find something that alleviates your symptoms. This could be your first line of defense against abdominal pain.

Safe Foods for Acid Reflux Sufferers

Safe Foods for the Acid Reflux

Food Group Foods With Little Potential to Cause Heartburn
Fruit • Apple, fresh
• Apple, dried
• Apple juice
• Banana
Vegetables • Baked potato
• Broccoli
• Cabbage
• Carrots
• Green beans
• Peas
Meat • Ground beef, extra-lean
• Steak, London Broil
• Chicken breast, skinless
• Egg whites
• Egg substitute
• Fish, no added fat
Dairy • Cheese, feta or goat
• Cream cheese, fat-free
• Sour cream, fat-free
• Soy cheese, low-fat
Grains • Bread, mult-grain or white
• Cereal, bran or oatmeal
• Corn bread
• Graham crakers
• Pretzels
• Rice, brown or white
• Rice cakes
Beverages • Mineral water
Fats / Oils • Salad dressing, low-fat
Sweets / Desserts • Cookie, fat-free
• Jelly beans
• Red licorice
• Potato chips, baked

Foods To Be Consumed In Moderation

Food Group Foods To Be Consumed With Discretion
Fruit • Orange juice, low-acid
• Apple cider
• Peach
• Blueberries
• Raspberries
• Strawberries
• Grapes
• Cranberries, dried
Vegetables • Garlic
• Onion, cooked
• Leeks
• Sauerkraut
• Scallions
Meat • Ground beef, lean
• Chicken salad
• Scrambled eggs, in butter
• Eggs, fried
• Fish, fried
• Tuna salad
• Hot dog, beef or pork
• Ham
Dairy • Yogurt
• Milk, 2 percent or skim
• Frozen yogurt
• Cottage cheese, low-fat
• Cheddar cheese
• Mozzarella cheese
Grains • Garlic bread
• Muffin
• Granola cereal
Beverages • Non-alcoholic wine
• Beer
• Non-alcoholic beer
• Cola
• Root beer
Fats / Oils • Ketchup
Sweets / Desserts • Cookie, low-fat

Indoor Plants Can Reduce Toxic Ozone Levels

PHILADELPHIA – Potted plants in the house can make indoor air healthier by cutting down ozone levels, according to a new study.

Ozone, the main component of air pollution, also known as smog, is a highly reactive, colorless gas formed when oxygen reacts with other chemicals.

Although ozone pollution is most often associated with outdoor air, the gas also infiltrates indoor environments through ordinary copy machines, laser printers, ultraviolet lights, and some electrostatic air purification systems, all of which contribute to increased indoor ozone levels.

Exposure to the toxic gas can lead to pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, inflammation, and reduction of lung function.

A research team from the Pennsylvania State University studied the effects of three houseplants such as snake plant, spider plant, and golden pothos, on indoor ozone levels.

To simulate an indoor environment, the researchers set up chambers in a greenhouse equipped with a charcoal filtration air supply system in which ozone concentrations could be measured and regulated.

Ozone was then injected into the chambers, and the chambers were checked every 5 to 6 minutes.

The findings revealed that ozone depletion rates were higher in the chambers that contained plants than in the control chambers without plants, but there were no differences in effectiveness among the three plants.

“Because indoor air pollution extensively affects developing countries, using plants as a mitigation method could serve as a cost-effective tool in the developing world where expensive pollution mitigation technology may not be economically feasible”, said the authors.

The study is published in American Society of Horticultural Science’s journal HortTechnology.

Heartburn Drugs Safe for Fetuses, says Israeli Study

BEER SHEVA – A new study done by Israeli scientists has shown that heartburn drugs are safe for the foetus.

The study, conducted by researchers at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, has been published in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

According to the new findings H2 blocker drugs like Famotidine, Cimetidine and Ranitidine, administered to pregnant women for reducing acid influx can be safely used.

The H2 blockers are the most commonly used medication to relieve acid reflux symptoms of heartburn, regurgitation and trouble swallowing in pregnant women.

Dr. Rafael Gorodischer, professor emeritus at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev said: “Of the vast majority of medications approved for use, there is insufficient data from human studies to determine whether the benefits of therapy exceed the risk to the fetus.

“Medicines are approved for use only after there is sufficient scientific evidence demonstrating the drug safety and effectiveness for its intended uses.”

“Exposure to H2 blockers among this group was not associated with significantly increased risks of major congenital malformations. The results were unchanged when therapeutic abortions of exposed fetuses were included in the analysis.

Also, infants exposed in utero had no increased risk of perinatal mortality, low birth weight or premature birth,” said Dr. Amalia Levy of the BGU Faculty of Health Sciences.