Scientists Construct First Map of How the Brain Organizes Everything We See

Our eyes may be our window to the world, but how do we make sense of the thousands of images that flood our retinas each day? Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have found that the brain is wired to put in order all the categories of objects and actions that we see. They have created the first interactive map of how the brain organizes these groupings. Continue reading

Sonar Device Brings Vision to those Blind from Birth

Researchers at Hebrew University in Jerusalem are developing a sonar-based device that, according to preliminary tests, already allows the congenitally blind to distinguish between different shapes and even to read. Just as shockingly, the device appears to activate areas of the brain that were formerly believed to Continue reading

Developing Technologies to Improve the Treatment of Craniosynostosis in Children

Engineers and surgeons are working together to improve the treatment of babies born with craniosynostosis, a condition that causes the bone plates in the skull to fuse too soon. Treating this condition typically requires surgery after birth to remove portions of the fused skull bones, and in some cases the bones grow together again too quickly — requiring additional surgeries.

Researchers in the Atlanta-based Center for Pediatric Healthcare Technology Innovation are developing imaging techniques designed to predict whether a child’s skull bones are likely to grow back together too quickly after surgery. They are also developing technologies that may delay a repeat of the premature fusion process. Continue reading

Deep Breeze Breakthrough Lets Patients Breathe Better

Around the globe, some 200 million people suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a progressive lung condition usually triggered by long-term smoking. As the disease worsens, patients typically face hospitalization several times a year – at a cost of thousands of dollars per day.

An Israeli company’s innovative medical device could radically change that scenario. Once approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the trademarked Breeze@home, will allow COPD and other chronic lung disease patients to stay out of the hospital while receiving continuous remote monitoring by their healthcare provider from home.

“This will not only make life more bearable for them, but will also save the healthcare system a lot of money,” points out Dr. Michael Nagler, CEO of Deep Breeze Continue reading