Study: Children who grow up on Family Farms and Drink Raw Milk Have Fewer Allergies, Autoimmune Disorders

Growing up on a family-scale farm and drinking raw cow’s milk are two important elements that promote robust childhood immune development. These are the findings of a recent study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, which found that farm-raised children generally tend to have less allergies, asthma and other autoimmune problems compared Continue reading

Ex-Smokers Feel Healthier In Two Weeks

Many young people believe they are invincible, which may be why some of them start smoking and think that the health problems associated with cigarette use won’t affect them. While the long-term consequences of smoking may not be enough to get young adults to quit, perhaps the immediate benefits that come with smoking cessation will. Continue reading

East Asian Mushroom Doubles Life Expectancy of Cancer Patients

There’s hope for liver cancer patients. And it doesn’t come in the form of toxic chemicals or invasive surgery…which kill you before the cancer does.

This remedy is an all-natural compound. It boosts the immune system and can double your survival rate after surgery. And if you don’t have liver cancer, it can keep you from getting it.

Telemedicine, East Asian Mushroom, Life Expectancy, cancer patients,Dr. Suwanna Cowawintaweewat is a molecular researcher at Thammasat University in Thailand. She has a PhD in biomedical sciences.

Dr. Cowawintaweewat recently studied the impact of the compound on advanced liver cancer. The results appeared in the Asian Pacific Journal of Allergy and Immunology.

A Better Solution Continue reading

Flood Water Can Turn Air in Homes Unhealthy according to Allergists.

Homeowners whose houses are flooding with the recent heavy rains should take extra precautions if they suffer from allergies or asthma, say allergists.

During a flood cleanup, indoor air quality in the home may appear to be the least of the problems. However, failure to remove contaminated materials and to reduce moisture and humidity can present serious long-term health risks. Standing water and wet materials quickly lead to, among other things, mold growth, to which many are allergic. The symptoms of mold allergy are very similar to the symptoms of other allergies and asthma, such as sneezing, itching, nasal discharge, congestion and cough and wheezing.

“One of the biggest issues homeowners will face is what to do about  Continue reading

A New Drug Delivery System May be provided Using a Body’s Defense Mechanism

Are our bodies vulnerable to some pollutants whose lack of solubility in water, or “hydrophobicity,” has always been thought to protect us from them? New Tel Aviv University research has discovered that this is indeed the case.

Studies by Dr. Michael Gozin of Tel Aviv University’s School of Chemistry at the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences and Dr. Dan Peer of TAU’s Laboratory of Nanomedicine in the Department of Cell Research and Immunology have revealed that mucus – the thick substance lining those internal bodily organs that come into contact with the outer environment, such as the respiratory system, the digestive system, and the female reproductive system – may instead play an active role in the penetration of hydrophobic substances, including toxins and carcinogens, into our cells. Continue reading

Failed Autoimmune Suppression Mechanism New Clue to Lupus

Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Cambridge, Mass., in collaboration with Jackson Laboratory scientists, have identified a regulatory defect that drives lupus.

Correcting the defect “may represent an effective therapeutic approach to systemic lupus erythematosus-like autoimmune disease,” the researchers state in their research paper, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research team was led by Harvey Cantor, M.D., chair of the department of cancer immunology and AIDS at Dana-Farber, in collaboration with the laboratory of Jackson Professor Derry Roopenian, Ph.D.

Autoimmune diseases develop when the immune system, which is supposed to identify and vanquish potentially dangerous infectious agents, instead attacks the individual’s own body. Most autoimmune diseases strike specific organs, such as the pancreas in type 1 diabetes. Lupus, however, is a systemic disease in which abnormal antibodies are produced throughout the body, inflaming a variety of tissues and organs, including the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys and brain.

Follicular T helper (TFH) cells fuel B cells to produce antibodies, which can be useful in fighting infections. But in lupus, TFH fuel B cells that produce dangerous antibodies that attack normal tissues (autoantibodies). CD8+ T cells (“killer T cells”), on the other hand, normally attack and destroy only infected cells. Cantor and colleagues discovered that a small, but critically important, population of CD8+ T cells (less than 5 percent), plays a specialized role in protecting from lupus. These so-called CD8+ T regulatory, or Treg, cells are specially equipped to destroy TFH cells, and by doing so, prevent lupus from developing.

Using a mouse model for systemic lupus erythematosus in humans that were originally discovered at 30 years ago by Edwin Murphy at The Jackson Laboratory, the Dana-Farber researchers, working with Roopenian’s laboratory, found defects in CD8+ Treg activity.

The new paper, Roopenian explains, is the first to demonstrate the potential breakdown of this suppression mechanism in lupus. “Overcoming this defect,” he says, “offers a potential approach prevent lupus.”

The Jackson Laboratory is a nonprofit biomedical research institution based in Bar Harbor, Maine. Its mission is to discover the genetic basis for preventing, treating and curing human diseases, and to enable research and education for the global biomedical community.

Immune System Weakened by Binge Drinking

WASHINGTON – Binge drinking can weaken body’s ability to fight off infections for at least 24 hours afterwards, finds a new study.

Stephen Pruett, currently at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Mississippi State University, USA and Ruping Fan of Louisiana State University Health Sciences Centre, USA, focused their study on the effect of heavy drinking on toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a protein that has an important role in immune system activation.

Previous research has shown that too much alcohol inhibits the body’s production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are signalling molecules that launch the inflammatory response to infection.

The new study conducted over mouse model has confirm that acute alcohol exposure prevents the body from producing certain key pro-inflammatory cytokines.

The researchers found that ethanol molecules suppress TLR4’s usual ability to send signals that would normally trigger the production of inflammatory cytokines.

Alcohol’s effects continue long after the party is over: some cytokines were still not on full duty guarding against infection 24 hours after the binge.

“The time frame during which the risk of infection is increased might be at least 24 hours,” said Pruett.

“A persistent effect of ethanol on cells is indicated, such that inhibition of the response of some cytokines occurs even after the ethanol is cleared,” he added.

The study is published in the open access journal BMC Immunology.