Blood pressure control could slow age-related brain damage

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • 1 in 3 American adults has high blood pressure, which increases your risk for heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and dementia
  • 95% of seniors between the ages of 60 and 90 have lesions in the white matter of their brains, and those with high blood pressure tend to have more white matter lesions and a higher risk for dementia in their later years
  • Recent research suggests intensive blood pressure treatment to reach a systolic blood pressure goal of 120 mm Hg can limit the progression of age-related brain damage, thereby lowering your risk for dementia
  • While those in the intensive treatment group suffered less brain damage (lesions) over time, they ended up losing a greater total volume of brain matter. The cause for this discrepancy is unknown, and it’s unclear what the clinical significance might be
  • Clinical blood pressure guidelines now call for a blood pressure goal of 120/80. Elevated blood pressure or prehypertension is defined as a systolic blood pressure between 120 and 129. Stage 1 high blood pressure is 130 and 139 systolic, and 80 to 89 diastolic. Stage 2 high blood pressure is anything over 140 systolic and 90 diastolic

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ALERT: Certified Organic Food Grown in U.S. Found Contaminated with Glyphosate Herbicide

Think you can avoid glyphosate by buying organic? Think again. A new investigation by Tropical Traditions reveals that many products in the organic grain market in the U.S. contain glyphosate residue at levels almost the same as conventional grains. Continue reading

Magnesium Improves Metabolic Profile In Metabolically Obese, Normal-Weight Individuals

Magnesium_DeficiencyIntroduction:

Some normal weight individuals show obesity-related characteristics such as insulin resistance, elevated fasting blood sugar levels, high triglyceride levels, and high blood pressure. Although eating a high carbohydrate diet is linked to these findings, Continue reading

The Benefits of Magnesium

Magnesium is a mineral that’s crucial to the body’s function. Magnesium helps keep blood pressure normal, bones strong, and the heart rhythm steady.

Why do people take magnesium?

Experts say that many people in the U.S. aren’t eating enough foods with magnesium. Adults who consume less than Continue reading

Dandelion Health Benefits

dandelion… a common weed has such astonishing medicinal benefits that gardeners may want to start growing it instead of uprooting it?

While gardeners can’t get rid of the dreaded dandelion fast enough, Western medicine is eager for more of this potent medicinal plant.  Used for centuries by herbalists for healing and preventative purposes, scientific scrutiny confirms that Continue reading

Coffee Grounds Make Great Supplements, a Study Shows

Coffee is currently in the crosshairs of a lot of scientists as they have come to realize that coffee, particularly coffee grounds, contains a lot of antioxidants that could be harnessed and placed into supplements. It is estimated that about 20 million tons of coffee grounds are used in a year as millions of people consume many cups of coffee daily. Continue reading

Kidney Disease Requires Magnesium

One of the contraindications for taking magnesium is kidney failure. Unfortunately the public and many doctors think that means magnesium should not be taken by anyone with any degree of kidney disease. That’s just not true and I’ll explain why.

I just completed a CME (continuing medical education) course on Chronic Kidney Disease. It’s become so common that it has its own initials (CKD) and Continue reading

Why Kidney Disease Patients Should Be Extra Careful with Nutrition

nutriOne in five overweight Americans is suffering from chronic kidney disease — a very significant number. A brand new piece of health news from the famous “Cleveland Clinic” has led to some valuable health advice: be careful when trying to shed pounds, because some things could damage your kidneys further. Continue reading

Include Watercress in Your Diet

Watercress arrests cancer growth as effectively as—if not better than—conventional cancer treatments… without all the side effects.

In September of last year, scientists from the Cancer Research Centre at Southampton General Hospital’s School of Medicine in the U.K. unveiled astounding findings about watercress.

Watercress is a member of the cruciferous (or cabbage) family of vegetables, all of which contain well-known cancer-fighting compounds. Now, this recent study shows that watercress can actually reduce levels of an important growth factor that spurs tumor development.  Essentially, compounds in watercress halt a process called angiogenesis— Continue reading

Could Patients Own Kidney Cells Cure Kidney Disease?

Reprogrammed kidney cells could make transplants and dialysis things of the past

  • Patients’ own kidney cells can be reprogrammed and used as therapy against kidney disease
  • Cells can easily be collected from the urine
  • 88,000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant in the United States, and they wait for an average of 3 to 5 years

Washington, DC — Approximately 60 million people across the globe have chronic kidney disease, Continue reading

Fat Deficiency Kills More People Every Year than Breast Cancer

Omega-3 deficiency is the sixth biggest killer of Americans, according to a new study.

Harvard University researchers looked at 12 dietary, lifestyle and metabolic risk factors such as tobacco smoking and high blood pressure, and used a mathematical model to determine how many fatalities could have been prevented if better practices had been observed.

The study determined that there were 72,000-96,000 preventable deaths each year due to omega-3 deficiency, highlighting the importance of establishing a dietary reference intake (DRI) for omega-3 forms such as EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).

Another study found that a combination of omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) decreased blood pressure and heart rate in kidney disease patients.

People with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which increases the risk of heart disease, experienced improvements in both blood pressure and heart rate following supplementation with four grams of omega-3 fats.

Furthermore, when the omega 3’s were taken in combination with coenzyme Q10, the blood pressure reducing benefits were enhanced. CKD is linked to increased prevalence in all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and hospitalization.

In addition to benefitting your physical health, omega-3 fats can also be good for your mind.

Researchers have shown that depressed patients have, on average, lower levels of omega-3 in their blood than nondepressed individuals. A greater severity of depression is also linked to lower levels of omega-3. A number of well-controlled depression treatment studies have found therapeutic benefits following omega-3 supplementation.

Diabetes: Sugar Smothers Body Immunity

 Higher glucose levels in people with diabetes can form a sugar coating smothering the mechanisms the body used to fight infections, a British researcher says.

 Dr. Daniel Mitchell of the University of Warwick’s Medical School in England and colleagues found glucose in the blood is similar in structure to two sugars — mannose and fucose — found on bacteria and fungi that signal the body infection need to be combated.

 However, high levels of glucose can interfere with the binding of mannose and fucose by the specialized immune receptors and can inhibit these infection-fighting chemical processes. This interference may lead to chronic inflammatory disease and increased cardiovascular and kidney disease risks.

 The study, published in the journal Immunobiology, finds the specialized receptors that recognize bacteria and fungi associated molecules can become “blinded” by unhealthy glucose levels and suggests this may help explain why diabetic complications often include increased risk of viral infections such as influenza.

 “Our findings offer a new perspective on how high glucose can potentially affect immunity and thus exert a negative impact on health,” Mitchell says in a statement. “It also helps to emphasize the importance of good diet on preventing or controlling diseases such as diabetes.”