7 Simple Ways to Unclog Your Arteries Naturally

We all want to live a long life, but did you know eating these simple foods has been proven scientifically to prevent and in some cases reverse the #1 cause of death in the modern world?

Statistically, atherosclerosis (the progressive clogging of the arteries) is the #1 killer on the planet.  A complex process, involving autoimmunity, infection, dietary incompatibilities, and many known and Continue reading

Natural Help for Erectile Dysfunction

The first step to naturally lowering your risk of impotence is to step out the door. Exercises like walking three hours per week drop your risk of having erectile dysfunction by 30 percent.1 And along with physical activity, a wide variety of herbs can also boost your sexual life.

The Value of Movement

If you’re an immovable object, your sex life isn’t likely to budge, either. An analysis of 31,742 men age 53 to 90 reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2003 shows that exercise keeps you leaner and fit for sex, as well as mentally more ready for sexual interaction.

Stress Obstructions Continue reading

Natural Alternatives to Cancer Treatments

The diagnosis of cancer doesn’t always have to necessitate debilitating treatments in a hospital. Available options include in-home protocols that some licensed practicing physicians offer their patients who want to try to beat cancer naturally.

Gerson Therapy Protocol

The German physician, Max B. Gerson, M.D., developed this highly acclaimed protocol. This therapy entails consuming 13 glasses of fresh, raw carrot/apple and green-leaf juices prepared hourly from fresh, organic fruits and vegetables and three full vegetarian meals, freshly prepared from organically grown fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

It includes these medications: Continue reading

Alternative Medicine Breakthroughs from Dr. Mercola and Dr. Oz

Just recently Dr. Joe Mercola was a guest on The Doctor Oz Show. Dr. Mercola, often called the “alternative health Guru” and Dr. Oz discussed the fact that that many medical doctors don’t believe in alternative medicine in “The Man Your Doctor Doesn’t Want You To Listen To” segment of the show.

Dr. Mercola believes that many medical conditions can be addressed through eating a healthy diet and taking natural supplements rather than taking pharmaceutical medications.

When Dr. Oz pointed out that Dr. Mercola sells supplements on his website Continue reading

Wonderful for Blood Pressure, Erectile Dysfunction, Migraines is L-Arginine

L-arginine is an amino acid that has numerous functions in the body. It helps the body get rid of ammonia (a waste product), is used to make compounds in the body such creatine, L-glutamate, and L-proline, and can be converted to glucose and glycogen if needed.

L-arginine is used to make the nitric oxide, a compound in the body that relaxes blood vessels. Preliminary studies have found that L-arginine may help with conditions that improve when blood vessels are relaxed (called vasodilation), such as atherosclerosis, erectile dysfunction, and intermittent claudication.

L-arginine is also involved in protein formation. In larger amounts, L-arginine stimulates the release of hormones growth hormone and prolactin.

Why Do People Use L-Arginine?

In the body, L-arginine is used to make nitric oxide, which reduces blood vessel stiffness, increases blood flow, and improves blood vessel function.

However, L-arginine should not be used following a heart attack. An study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health examining the use of L-arginine after a heart attack was terminated early after six patients died, a disproportionate number. There were no deaths in the patients who did not receive L-arginine.

The study researchers speculate that L-arginine may aggravate the effects of cardiac shock. The results were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Erectile Dysfunction

L-arginine has been used for erectile dysfunction. Like the drug sildenafil citrate (Viagra), L-arginine is thought to enhance the action of nitric oxide, which relaxes muscles surrounding blood vessels supplying the penis. As a result, blood vessels in the penis dilate, increasing blood flow, which helps maintain an erection. The difference in how they work is that Viagra blocks an enzyme called PDE5 which destroys nitric oxide and L-arginine is used to make nitric oxide.

In one study, 50 men with erectile dysfunction took either 5 grams of L-arginine per day or a placebo. After six weeks, more men in the L-arginine group had an improvement compared to those taking the placebo.

Unlike Viagra, L-arginine must be taken daily.

Wound healing

L-arginine’s possible activity in wound repair may be due to its role in the formation of L-proline, an important amino acid that is essential for the synthesis of collagen.

Other Conditions

L-arginine is also used for high blood pressure, migraines, sexual dysfunction in women, intermittent claudication, and interstitial cystitis.

Sources of L-Arginine

L-arginine is conditionally essential, which means that the body normally has enough. It’s produced in the kidney and to a lesser extent, in the liver.

Food sources of L-arginine include plant and animal proteins, such as dairy products, meat, poultry, fish, and nuts. The ratio of L-arginine to lysine is also important – soy and other plant proteins have more L-arginine than animal sources of protein.

Severe burns, infections, and injuries can deplete the body’s supply of arginine. Under these conditions, L-arginine becomes essential and it is necessary to ensure proper intake to meet the increased demands.

L-arginine is also essential for children with rare genetic disorders that impair the formation of L-arginine.

Side Effects of L-Arginine

L-arginine may lower blood pressure because it is involved in the formation of nitric oxide. It may also result in indigestion, nausea, and headache.

L-arginine should not be used following a heart attack. If you have a history of heart disease, consult your doctor before taking L-arginine.

Higher doses of arginine can increase stomach acid, so it may worsen heartburn, ulcers, or digestive upset cause by medications. Arginine appears to increase stomach acid by stimulating the production of gastrin, a hormone that increases stomach acid.

L-arginine may also alter potassium levels, especially in people with liver disease. People with kidney disease and those who take ACE inhibitors or potassium sparing diuretics

Viagra Compounds Found to Shrink Abnormally Large Hearts

ROCHESTER  – Compounds related to Viagra, already in clinical trials to prevent heart failure, may also counter the disease in a different way, says a new study.

The results hold promise for the design of a new drug class and for its potential use in combination with Viagra or beta blockers.

In heart failure, which affects about 5.7 million Americans, the heart gradually loses the ability to pump with enough force to supply the body with blood.

One reason for lost pumping strength is the mass death of heart muscle cells seen in many heart attacks. Fewer remaining muscle cells must then push around the same amount of blood, and hard working muscles grow.

Unlike the healthy bulging of an athlete’s bicep, abnormal muscle growth (pathogenic hypertrophy) in diseased hearts thickens chamber walls, slows the heartbeat and causes potentially fatal arrhythmias (erratic beats) and heart failure as well.

Recent efforts to reverse hypertrophy included a clinical trial, sponsored by Viagra manufacturer Pfizer, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), where they looked at whether Viagra (sildenafil) can treat moderate heart failure and reduce hypertrophy.

Along with increasing blood flow in arteries, Viagra interferes with phosphodiesterases (PDEs), the enzymes that break down the messenger molecule called cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which would otherwise restrain heart muscle cell growth.

“Our results suggest that a PDE1a inhibitor alone can shut down abnormal cardiac growth, and when combined with Viagra or beta blockers, may do so in more than one way,” said Chen Yan, associate professor cardiology, University of Rochester Medical Centre (URMC) and study co-author, says a Rochester release.

Yan’s lab is focused on revealing the role of various PDE enzymes in atherosclerosis and hypertension as well as in heart failure.

Now a Molecular GPS’ to Help Probe Aging and Disease Processes

DETROIT – Michigan researchers have developed a powerful new GPS-like tool to identify proteins that are affected by a chemical process that is key to aging and disease development.

The probe, which works like a GPS or navigation system for finding these proteins in cells, could lead to new insights into disease processes and identify new targets for disease treatments, according to the researchers.

Kate Carroll and colleagues said that it has long been known that the excess build-up of highly reactive oxygen-containing molecules in cells can contribute to aging, and possibly to disorders like cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

It is believed that a diet rich in antioxidants, which are abundant in fruits and vegetables, may help cease this cell-damaging process by blocking the accumulation of these molecules, also known as reactive oxygen species (ROS).

However, to date, scientists have not found any proper tools to study the effects of these molecules in detail.

Thus, the researchers developed a new molecule called DAz-2, which, according to them, functions like a tiny GPS device for quickly finding specific proteins that are affected by ROS.

The molecules do this by chemically “tagging” sulfenic acid, which is formed in cells and indicates that a protein has undergone a type of reaction – called oxidation – caused by ROS.

In lab studies using cultured cells, the scientists identified more than 190 proteins that undergo this reaction.

The researchers said that the study could lead to better strategies for fighting the wide range of diseases that involve these excessive oxidation reactions.

The study will be published in ACS Chemical Biology, a monthly journal

Malaria Parasite Infects Gorillas, Not Just Humans

YAOUNDE – Gorillas carry the parasite that causes malignant malaria in humans, a finding that could help in efforts to develop a vaccine for malaria, researchers say.

Malaria is a sometimes fatal disease, usually contracted from mosquitoes, most commonly in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. People who contract malaria typically develop flu-like symptoms with high fevers and chills, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In the new study, researchers analyzed fecal samples from 84 gorillas in Cameroon and blood samples from three gorillas in Gabon and found the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which was previously believed to only infect humans. P. falciparum causes 85 percent of malignant malaria infections in humans and nearly all deaths from malaria.

The scientists also found that the gorillas carried two closely related species of malaria parasites: Plasmodium GorA and Plasmodium GorB.

The discovery of P. falciparum in gorillas complicates efforts to eradicate malaria, according to the study published in this week’s issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“Hundreds of billions of dollars are spent each year toward ridding humans of malignant malaria. But success may be a pyrrhic victory, because we could be re-infected by gorillas — just as we were originally infected by chimps a few thousand years ago,” study co-author Francisco Ayala, a biologist at the University of California, Irvine, said in a university news release.

Along with potentially aiding in the development of a malaria vaccine, this finding helps improve understanding of how infectious diseases such as HIV, SARS and bird and swine flu can be transmitted from animals to humans, the researchers noted.

Each year, malaria sickens about 500 million people worldwide and causes 2 million infant deaths. Four kinds of malaria parasites can infect humans: P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae. Infection with P. falciparum, if not promptly treated, may lead to death, according to the CDC.

 

Soon, Robo-Bees that Mimic Bees Behavior

Soon, Robo-Bees that Mimic Bees Behavior

WASHINGTON – A Northeastern University neurobiologist is collaborating with Harvard University researchers to develop micro flying robots that will emulate the bees’ brain, body and collective behavior.

Biology professor Joseph Ayers would create robots, called the robobees, which would mimic the communal feeding behavior of bee colonies.

The project will draw on the knowledge of computer scientists, engineers, and biologists to construct an electronic nervous system, a supervisory architecture and a high-energy source to power the innovative robots.

“This project will integrate the efforts and expertise of a diverse team of investigators to create a system that far transcends the sum of its parts. We expect substantial advances in basic science at the intersection of these seemingly disparate disciplines to result from this effort,” said Ayers.

Inspired by the biology of the bee and the insect’s colonial behaviour, the project aims to advance miniature robotics and the design of compact high-energy power sources.

The project would also spur innovations in ultra-low-power computing and electronic “smart” sensors that mediate biomimetic control.

In addition, it would refine coordination algorithms to manage multiple, independent machines.

Ayers is widely known for his work in biomimetics- the science of adapting the control systems found in nature to inform design of engineered systems to solve real-world problems-including the development of RoboLobster and RoboLamprey.

The autonomous, biomimetic underwater robotic models emulate the operations of the animals’ nervous systems using an electronic controller based on nonlinear, moving models of neurons and synapses.

“Animals have evolved to occupy every environmental niche where we would hope to operate robots, save outer space. They provide proven solutions to problems that confound even the most sophisticated robots, and our challenge is to capture these performance advantages in engineered devices,” said Ayers.

The Pill Bottle Gets a Cell Phone, to Remind You to Take Your Medicine

The Pill Bottle Gets a Cell Phone, to Remind You to Take Your Medicine

CAMBRIDGE – “Hi! This is your aspirin bottle calling. I haven’t seen you in a while. Why don’t you come see me soon? I’m good for the heart, you know.”

That’s the spirit, if not the wording, of the calls that will come from new pill bottle caps that connect to AT&T Inc.’s wireless network.

A Cambridge, Mass.-based startup called Vitality Inc. was set to announce the pill-bottle system Thursday, saying it helps solve one of the biggest problems in medicine: that people don’t consistently take the drugs they’re prescribed.

That costs the U.S. $290 billion in added medical spending each year, according to a study published in August by the New England Healthcare Institute. Mortality rates are twice as high among diabetes and heart disease patients who don’t take their pills properly, it said.

With Vitality’s system, when a pill-bottle cap is opened, it uses a close-range wireless signal to tell a base station in the home. That station, which looks like a night light, essentially has a cell phone inside that can send messages through AT&T’s network.

If the bottle isn’t opened at the appointed time, the cap and night light start blinking to remind the owner to take the medication. If that doesn’t serve as enough of a hint, they start playing jingles as well. If the bottle stays unopened, the night light will send a message to Vitality’s system, which can then place an automated phone call or send a text message with a reminder.

That points to another possibility opened by the wireless bottle cap: making the pill-taking routine more than just a matter between the patient and the bottle. Vitality’s system can be set to alert a relative if someone isn’t taking medicine.

“The social aspect of this is important,” Vitality CEO David Rose said. “Almost every successful behavior change program, the academics will tell you, involves social dynamics, whether it’s smoking cessation or Weight Watchers.”

A price for the new system hasn’t been disclosed. Vitality hopes insurance and drug companies will get on board with the system and cover the cost.

Vitality has been selling an earlier version of the product in small numbers from its Web site for $99. In that version, the night light doesn’t contain a cell phone. Instead it connects to a third piece of hardware, a “gateway” plugged into a home’s Internet router. But not all homes have routers, and configuring them can be tricky. The AT&T-powered night light simplifies the installation.

The Best Commercial Bread To Buy

BEVERLY HILLS – US Tele-Medicine, the operators of this blog, rarely recommends any product because there are always opposing viewpoints with respect to ingredients, integrity or manufacture.  There are no perfect products manufactured by man.  There are close exception to that understanding.  This is one of them.

Wheat is a mainstay of many peoples and national diets around the world.  Wheat itself is quite healthy and beneficial source of carbs and fibers.  Wheat becomes less healthy  when we add yeasts, preservatives, enhancers and flavors, in any baked goods.   This is not to mention the sugars, syrups, fruits, emulsifiers and binders, added to the wheat by most mass- market commercial bakeries.  This is when wheat becomes toxic.

All commercial brands of breads have some other “natural” product added to the wheat, which always disturbs the structure of the beneficial fibers and confuses the body looking for clean carbs.  Except one.

In our opinion, the BEST commercial bread is found at Trader Joe’s Markets and branded as “Pain Pascal Organic Demi Miche.”  The ingredients: Organic Whole Wheat Flour, Filtered Water, and Sea Salt.   

The texture is incredibly soft, dense like a European country bread and very moist.  The taste is superb and especially aromatic lathered with some good Irish or Danish butter.  It toasts very heartily and the full crispy-on-the-outside, moist- on- the- inside effect is always there.

It is delicious, hearty, attractive, and very healthy for you to eat.  Bon appetite.   

Index of Posts through December 31, 2009

Index of Posts through December 31, 2009

 

TO FIND ANY POST, SIMPLY ENTER SOME KEY WORDS IN THE SEARCH BOX

 

1 in 5 U.S. kids found deficient in vitamin D

3-D Structure of Human Genome Deciphered

8 Million Americans Seriously Consider Suicide Annually

A Mind That Touches the Past

Active Elders Live Longer: Study

Acupuncture, herbal medicine become more popular in U.S.

Adding Flaxseed to Juices, Salads, Jellies Fight Prostate Cancer

Alcoholism Affects Sleep During Sober Periods

Aligning Your Chakras

Alternative Supplements Can Now Be Claimed on Your Insurance and Get a Cash Refund

Alzheimers Risk Linked to Level of Appetite Hormone

Ancient Surgeries – Trepanation and Nose Jobs

Animals Using One Side of their Brains are More Successful

Anti-Ageing Creams Could Cause Cancer

Antifungal Effects of Pumpkin Protein

Antioxidant in Melon Relieves Stress          

Ants Can Count

Anxiety, Depression Much More Common Than Thought

Appealing Health Insurance Denials

Are There Toxins in Your Herbs?

Are You Unwittingly Practicing Alternative Medicine?

Artificial Sweeteners Linked to Kidney Decline

Aspirin Is Only for Heart Patients

Aura’ Migraines a Stroke Risk

Aussie Scientists Find HIV Reservoir in Brain

Autopsy Reveals Ancient Egyptian Mummy Died of TB

Bacteria Can Transform Minerals Electrically

Bad Drug Reactions, Side Effects – 500,000 US Kids to Doctor Each Year

Basic Hygiene More Effective Against Swine Flu than Drugs

Being Too Optimistic could Harm Weight Loss Efforts

Best Vitamins for Women

Better Ventilation May Ease some Asthma

Bike Rides for Women Over 50 Can Cut 16 Years off Age

Binge Drinking Weakens Body’s Ability to Fight Infections

Biodynamic the New Organic?

Bionic Eye May Help Blind See: Retinal Prosthesis Shown To Restore Partial Vision

Blueberries Keep Brain Active In the Afternoon

Brain Function of Earthquake Survivors Acutely Affected

Brain Prods You Into Gorging on Good Food

Brain’s Face Processing Ability does Reduce with Age

Brains Can be Trained

Breakdown of Who Lacks Health Insurance by State

Breast Milk Best if Consumed as Soon as it is Expressed

 Breathalyzer Screening may Help Spot Lung Cancer Early

Breathing Technique can Reduce Asthma Severity

Brit Men Having Boob Jobs on the Rise

Broken Heart ‘Ups Heart Attack Risk’

Brown University Study Of Marijuana Use In Head And Neck Cancer

California’s Real Death Panels: Insurers Deny 21% of Claims

Calorie Restriction Reduces Disease and Extends Life

Cancer patients and their experiences of using the Internet  

Cannabis Helps Sleep Apnea

Cannabis in The Old Testament

Celiac Disease and Osteoporosis Link Brings Possible Treatment

Cherry Juice May Help Ease the Pain of Sore Muscles

Childhood Physical Abuse Linked To Arthritis, Study Finds

Chilling Brains Aids in Cardiac Care

Chinese Herbal Medicines For Preventing Diabetes In High Risk People

Chinese herbs may hold back diabetes

Chlorophyll Compounds may Help Treat Cancer

Cholesterol Crucial to Brain Development

Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients Going for Alternative Medicine

Chyawanprash: Ancient Indian Elixir

Cities, Human Brains Evolved in Similar Ways

Cocktail with real snake venom has bite

Coffee Can Give Kids Sleepless Nights, Breathing Problems

Coffee May Stop Liver Disease

Cola Drinking Linked to Diabetes in Pregnancy

Color Therapy

Combination Heart Device Cut Chances of Heart Failure by 41 Percent

Common Abbreviations Used in Nutrition

Common Attitudes About Personal Pain

Complementary Therapies for Eczema

Comprehensive Eating Disorders Dictionary for Parents

Consciousness is Brains Wi-Fi Network

Controlling Your Breathing Helps Sea Sickness

Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?

Could This Forbidden Medicine Eliminate the Need for Drugs?

Cup of Aloe Nutritious Shake, Herbal Tea make for a Healthy Breakfast

Cup of Mint Tea is an Effective Painkiller

Curry Compound Kills Cancer

Curry Spice ‘Kills Cancer Cells’

Depressed Teens Higher Risk of Mental Health Problems in Later Life

Depression Leads to Protein Linked to Heart Disease

Determining the Quality of your Supplements.

Dietary Fiber Can Keep Diseases at Bay

Different Anxiety Disorders

Dimensions of the Most Attractive Face

Dioxin In Your Daily Life Causes Cancer

Disease-Detecting Device Vibrates with Potential

Do Multivitamins Curb Kids Allergy Risk?

Doctors Unable to Restrain Mentally Ill From Smoking

Does Acupuncture Help Your Back?

Don’t Spank Your Kids if You Want Them to be Intelligent

Don’t Watch Your Wife Give Birth or You May Get Divorced

Drinking Coffee During Midlife May Reduce the Risk of Dementia in Later Life

Dung of the Devil Plant Roots may Offer Swine Flu Cure

Eat the Butter: Study Finds Fatty Foods Help Pilots on Mental, Flying Tests

Eating Walnuts Cuts Cholesterol

Efforts to Promote Breast Feeding Urged

Egyptian Mummies Had Clogged Arteries

Elderly Women Sleep Better Than They Think, Men Nap Worse

EU Grants Nearly $2.25M For Complementary Medicine Research

Exercise can Cut Heart Disease Deaths by 60 per cent

Exercising in the Heat may Help You Eat Less

Experts Map the Body’s Bacteria

External therapy Cannabinoids Effective in Reducing Pain Patients with Herpes Zoster

Extra-Virgin Olive Oil may Help Prevent, Treat Alzheimer’s

Facebook May Boost your Brain’s Working Memory

Face-to-Face Medical Care over the Internet?

Fake Blood-Clotting Products to Heal Wounded Soldiers

Fashion and Beauty Trends in Fall Takes Toll on Health

Fibromyalgia: Treatable With Chiropractic Care and Reimbursable Through GE

Fighting Infection With Manuka Honey

FIRST-OF-ITS KIND HEALTH CARE PLAN REIMBURSES USERS OF MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Flaxseed May Lower Cholesterol

Flickering Bright Colors Likely To Trigger Epileptic Fits

Flower Essence Therapy

For Patients Suffering With Chronic Rhinosinusitis

Forgotten Memories Still Exist in the Brain

Four Major Food Groups for a Healthy Life

Four Things You Didn’t Know About Natural Medicine

Frequent Nasal Irrigation May Increase Infections

Gene Mutation May Cause Pupils’ Low Grades

Gene Therapy May Soon Help Dieters Keep Off Weight Gain

Genetic Link Between Psychosis and Creativity Revealed

Gingko Biloba May Protect From Radiation

Glucosamine Effectiveness

Glucose Could Potentially Power Our Gadgets, Cars

Green Spaces ‘Improve Health’

Green Tea may Help Improve Bone Health

Hand Size–Not Sex–Determines Sense of Touch

Having a Pet Can Help You Stay Healthy

Health Canada Warns of Health Risks Posed by Rating Raw Bean Sprouts

Health insurance Premiums Rose Modestly in 2009

Healthy Foods that Contain Vitamin A

Heartburn Drugs Safe for Fetuses, says Israeli Study

HERBAL MEDICINES IN YOUR BACKYARD

Herbal Supplements: What to Know Before You Buy

Here is Why Evolution is Irreversible

Here’s How Exposure to Diesel Fumes Causes Cancer

Here’s What Causes Arteries To Clog Up

Here’s Why Sugar in Green Tea is a Healthy Idea

 Here’s Why Wine is Good for Health

High Dose Folate And B Vitamin Supplements Increase Uterine Cancer Risk

High-Fat Diet Harms Muscle Health in Pre-Diabetic Teens

High-Fructose Diet Increases Blood Pressure Risk

High-Protein Diets Shrink the Brain

Hippocampus Governs How We Devise Concepts in the Brain

History of Homeopathy

HIV Outwits Yet Another Microbicide

Home Remedies Series – Allergies

Home Remedies Series – Amnesia

Home Remedies Series – Anorexia

 Home Remedies Series – Anxiety

Home Remedies Series – Arthritis

Home Remedies Series – Athletes foot

Home Remedies Series – Belching

Home Remedies Series – Burns

Home Remedies Series – Colitis

Home Remedies Series – Conjunctivitis

Home Remedies Series – Cracked Heels

Home Remedies Series – Dandruff

Home Remedies Series – Dark Circles

Home Remedies Series – Depression

Home Remedies Series – Diarrhea

Home Remedies Series – Dizziness

Home Remedies Series – Edema

Home Remedies Series – Hair

Home Remedies Series – Insomnia

Home Remedies Series – Intestinal Worms

Home Remedies Series – Kidney Stones

Home Remedies Series – Obesity

Home Remedies Series – Razor Burns

Home Remedies Series – Varicose Veins

Home Remedies Series – Vertigo

Honey Sends Virility-Seeking Men to the ER

How Addictive Drugs Influence Learning and Memory

How Color Plays Musical Chairs in the Brain

How Proximity to Convenience Stores Promotes Child Obesity

How Silver is Used in Wellness

How Some People Maintain Weight Loss, Others Don’t

How the Brain Encodes Memories at a Cellular Level

How to Eliminate and Prevent Cancer

How to Get Your Medical Insurer to Cover Alternative Medicine Treatments, If you are Not USTM Patient

How to Make Antibiotics More Effective at Lower Doses

How To Relieve Pain Without Medicine

India Suggests Therapeutic Cloning

India, Nigeria, Congo Account for 40 percent Child Deaths

Individual Reactions to Traumatic Stress

Indoor Plants Can Reduce Toxic Ozone Levels

Innovative, Low-Cost Medical and Diagnostic Tests

Introducing – Aloe Vera

Introducing – Bee Propolis

Introducing – Bilberry

Introducing – CoQ10

Introducing – Devil’s claw

Introducing – DHEA

Introducing – Ephedra

Introducing – Feverfew

Introducing – Ginger

Introducing – Guarana

Introducing – Licorice Root

Introducing – Melatonin

Introducing – Milk Thistle

Introducing – Milk Thistle

Introducing – Multivitamins

Introducing – Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Introducing – Policosanol – The Natural Statin

Introducing – Saw Palmetto

Introducing – St. John’s Wort

Introducing – Tribulus

Introducing – Valerian

Introducing – Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

Introducing – Vitamin C

Introducing – Vitamin E

Introducing – Vitamin K

Introducing – White Willow Bark

Introducing – Zinc

Iodine Must for Developing Kids’ Intellect

It’s Not a Tumor, It’s a Brain Worm

Keep the Body Alkaline for Optimum Health

Key Mechanism in Development of Nerve Cells Found

Know the Difference between Cold and Swine Flu Symptoms

Lack of Sunshine Vitamin Linked to High BP in Women

Laptop Save Student From Dropping Dead

Large Thighs May Protect Heart

L-Arginine is wonderful for Blood Pressure, Erectile Dysfunction, Wound Healing

Lesser Known Chinese Herbal Remedies

Light, Photosynthesis Harmful to Fresh Produce

Living Proof – A Man’s Unusual Prescription for Bone Cancer

Long Lasting Weight Loss

Loss of Loved One make Grievers Vulnerable to Heart Attacks

LSD and Cannabis Less Harmful than Alcohol, says UK Drug Expert

Lupus News

Lychee Fruit for Metabolic Syndrome

Male and Female Chromosomes do Communicate with Each Other

Males Experience Loss of Libido During Hepatitis-C Therapy

Man ‘Allergic’ to His Wife

MDs Could Learn From African Healers

Measles Vaccine Inhaler Shows Promise    

Meat Linked to Prostate Cancer

Mechanism Related to Onset of Genetic Diseases Identified

Meddling in Mosquitoes Sex Life Could Cut Malaria

Medical error is a lot more dangerous than homeopathy

Melatonin Improves Mood In Winter Depression

Memory Test Spots Pre-Dementia

Men More Vulnerable to Mental Illness, Say Experts

Mid-Life Obesity Cuts Women Chances of Healthy Survival

Mobile Microscopes Illuminate the Brain

More good news about bad times: the Great Depression increased US life expectancy

More On Life Saving L-Arginine – Heart Health

More On the Great L-Arginine – Improves Blood Flow and Exercise Capacity

More People Rely On Alternative Medicine

More Women Opting to Remove Healthy Breast After Cancer Diagnosis

Most Babies Born This Century Will Live to 100

Nanotechnology and Resveratrol

Native American Herbal Remedies No. 1

Native American Herbal Remedies No. 2

Natural Compounds in Vegetables Make Chemotherapy More Effective

Natural Hormone Replacement Therapy

Natural Hydrogel May Boost Spinal Cord

New Aircraft Air Filter System Destroy 99.9% of Bugs

New Approach to Wrinkles Could Replace Botox

New Biomarker Can Bring Rapid Relief from Major Depression

New Chip Can Detect Cancer Early  

New Drug Kills Cancer Like a Stealth Slayer

New Evidence That Marijuana is Safe, Effective

New iPhone Apps to Study Human Body in 3-D

New Microchip-Based Device Can Put an End to Painful Biopsies

New Patsari Stove Smproves Women’s Lung Health

New Weight-Loss Fad Uses Tongue Patches Make Eating Painful

No Pain, No Gain Applies to Happiness too

Noisy Roads Ups High Blood Pressure Risk

Non-Invasive Way of Diagnosing Sleep Apnea

Normal Ranges for the Two Types of Cholesterol

Not All Expert Advice is the Right Advice – Medical Myths

Novel Cancer Therapy Found by TA Researchers

Novel Minimally Invasive Technique to Treat Snoring

Novel Treatment Helps Paralyzed Rats Walk Again After Spinal-Cord Injury

Obese Kids Aged 12 Early Signs of Heart Disease

Obese Women have Less Chances of Enjoying Old Age

Obesity Spurs a Tide of Cancer in Europe

On-Off Fasting Helps Obese Adults Shed Pounds

ORPHCAM Project first to look at GP-CAM interface in rural areas

Oxidized Form of Vitamin A May Treat Bowel Diseases

Oxygen Therapy Can Help Cluster Headaches

Parkinson’s – A Novel Therapeutic Target

Patients in Vegetative State Can Learn, say Researchers   

Peculiar Pageant Focuses on Surgically Enhanced Beauties

People Having Social Groups Stay Healthy

People Susceptible to Colon Cancer Cut their Risk in Half with Aspirin

Pervasive E-health services using communication technology

Phobias – 540 Common Phobias

Physically Active Boys Are Smarter

Pig bristles latest cure for eye problems

Pituitary Tumor Caused World’s Tallest Man’s Gigantism

Port Wine Birthmarks Now Easy to Remove with Laser Therapy

Preservation of Antibiotics

Preventing Hepatitis

Prevention In Getting H1N1 Flu

Prospects for Brain Regenerative Medicine

PROTECT YOURSELF TOXIC CHEMICALS IN PERSONAL CARE AND SKIN CARE PRODUCTS

Protecting Your Virtual Privacy – Health Information

Qwest’s Connections Power Colorado Telehealth

Radon Gas the Second Leading Cause of Lung Cancer

Reduce the Side Effects of Antibiotics

Regular Exercise Cuts Prostate Cancer Risk

Remains of World’s Oldest Human Brain Found in Armenia

Researchers Find a Way to Block Fat Consumption

Researchers Test Smart Bandage for Wireless Vitals Monitoring

Researchers tout cheap eHealth alternative

Resynchronization Cuts Down Risk of Heart Failures

Retinal Implant Could Help Restore Part of Vision

Right Dose of Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Be Identified

Santa Should Get Off His Sleigh, Give Up Brandy and Walk

Scientists Create World’s Tiniest Laser Squeezing Light

Scientists Develop Tiny Sensor to Sniff Toxins

Scientists Identify Another Step in Memory Formation

Scientists Identify Bacterium That Helps in Formation of Gold

Scientists Map How White Blood Cells Repair Wounds

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Sexually Satisfied Women Experience Greater Vitality

Sexually Satisfied Women Experience Greater Vitality

Shame Is Essential, But You Can Get Out Of It

Shockwave Therapy Shows Promise for Erectile Dysfunction

Short-Term Stress Boosts Anti-Tumor Activity

Skinny Friends with Big Appetites Bad for Weight Watching

Sleep Loss may Lead to Alzheimer’s

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Study Finds Women Happier than Men, While Youth Most Distressed

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TELE-MEDICINE SERVICE OVER SATELLITE NETWORK.

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How to Make Antibiotics More Effective at Lower Doses

NEW YORK – Researchers at the NYU School of Medicine say that they have gained significant insights into a mechanism that plays an important role in making human pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis resistant to numerous antibiotics.

Writing about their work in the journal Science, they have said that their study provides evidence that Nitric Oxide (NO) is able to alleviate the oxidative stress in bacteria caused by many antibiotics, and that it also helps to neutralize many antibacterial compounds.

Lead researcher Evgeny A. Nudler, The Julie Wilson Anderson Professor of Biochemistry at NYU Langone Medical Center, says in the report that eliminating this NO-mediated bacterial defence renders existing antibiotics more potent at lower, less toxic, doses. he researcher further says that the study’s findings pave the way for new ways of combating bacteria that have become antibiotic resistant.

A study Nudler led a few years ago had shown that bacteria mobilize NO to defend against the oxidative stress.

The new study supports the radical idea that many antibiotics cause the oxidative stress in bacteria, often resulting in their death, whereas NO counters this effect.

Based on this work, the researchers have come to the conclusion that scientists may use commercially available inhibitors of NO-synthase, an enzyme producing NO in bacteria and humans, to make antibiotic resistant bacteria like MRSA and ANTHRAX more sensitive to available drugs during acute infection.

“Developing new medications to fight antibiotic resistant bacteria like MRSA is a huge hurdle, associated with great cost and countless safety issues. Here, we have a short cut, where we don’t have to invent new antibiotics. Instead, we can enhance the activity of well established ones, making them more effective at lower doses,” says Nudler.

“We are very excited about the potential impact of this research in terms of continuing to push the boundaries of research in the area of infectious diseases,” said Dr. Vivian S. Lee, vice dean for science, senior vice president and chief scientific officer of NYU Langone Medical Center.

“With the emergence of drug resistant bacteria, it’s imperative that researchers strive to find conceptually new approaches to fight these pathogens,” Lee added.

PLEASE READ OUR POST ON L-ARGININE – 

Meat Linked to Prostate Cancer

MIAMI – Eating large amounts of red and processed meats may be linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer, researchers report in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

The authors followed 175,343 men in the United States who were 50-71 years old from 1995 until 2003. They recorded the participants’ meat consumption, including the type of meat they ate and how they cooked it, and monitored their iron levels, nitrite/nitrate intake and the number of prostate cancer diagnoses.

By the end of the study, 10,313 developed prostate cancer, of which 419 died.

After adjusting for various factors known to increase the risk of prostate cancer, the authors found that men who ate the most red meat were 12 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer and 33 percent more likely to develop advanced prostate cancer than those who ate the least amount.

Processed meat was also linked to a higher risk of prostate cancer. However, the authors noted that red processed meats (like hot dogs and bacon) were linked to a greater cancer risk than white processed meats (like turkey sandwich meat).

Grilling was the only cooking method that was linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer. It has been suggested that cancer risk may be increased by compounds called heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are formed when meat (especially red meat) is cooked at high temperatures. When heated, the amino acids, sugars and creatinine are converted into HCAs and PAHs, which have been linked to various cancers, including stomach, colorectal, pancreatic and breast cancers, in humans.

Nitrate intake was also correlated with an increased risk of the disease. Nitrates are preservatives that are added to processed and cured meats such as cold cuts and bacon. The preservatives have been associated with cancer-causing chemicals called nitrosamines.

This study supports growing evidence that too much meat may be unhealthy. Earlier studies suggest that red or processed meat may increase the risk of colon cancer and death (particularly from cancer and heart disease) and may be linked to age-related macular degeneration. Red meat also contains high amounts of saturated fats, which have been shown to increase the risk of heart disease.

Some other dietary changes may help reduce the risk of prostate cancer. For instance, eating fewer dairy products that are high in fat (like ice cream, cheese and sour cream) may be beneficial. Also, cruciferous vegetables (such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower) have been reported to contain cancer-fighting phytochemicals that may decrease the chances of developing prostate cancer.

The American Urological Association (AUA) encourages men who are in good health to have annual PSA testing starting at age 50, or at age 40 if they are in high-risk groups, such as African American men or those with histories of the disease.

Shockwave Therapy Shows Promise for Erectile Dysfunction

PARIS – It sounds painful, but shockwave therapy may be an effective treatment for men who suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED), according to a small study showcased here at the European Society for Sexual Medicine.

Focused shockwaves, generated by a special machine, is an established method of breaking up kidney stones. In patients with heart disease, shockwave therapy is being increasingly used to grow blood vessels.

“If the therapy can work in the small vessels of the heart, we felt that it might work in the penis because most patients with erectile dysfunction have vascular (blood vessel) problems,” Dr. Yoram Vardi, from Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel, told Reuters Health.

Vardi and colleagues tested their low-intensity shockwave protocol in 20 men with mild or moderate ED caused by reduced blood flow in the penis.

All of the men underwent a three-week course of two weekly treatment sessions and a second identical round of shockwave therapy starting three weeks later. During each treatment session, low-energy shockwave therapy was applied to different areas of the penis for a few minutes.

Erectile function, assessed at the time of enrollment and four weeks after the end of treatment, improved significantly in 15 of the men, Vardi and colleagues found.

There were no side effects related to the treatment.

Although not presented at the meeting, six-month follow-up data show that 12 of the 15 patients who significantly improved with treatment said they no longer needed to use Viagra or a similar agent to treat their ED.

While drugs like Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis are “extremely effective at treating ED, they only provide functional improvement,” Vardi noted. Shockwave therapy “could potentially be useful to most ED patients,” the researcher said.

GEMS doctors often recommend the amino acid L-Arginine as a natural remedy for ED.