Helpful Tips for Keeping Pests out of your Organic Garden

One of the biggest challenges that organic gardeners have long faced is invasive pests, which as you may well know tend to target food crops that have not been treated with toxic pesticides. But maintaining a truly organic garden is not an impossible task, especially if you are willing to take the time to employ some tried and true methods of deterring pests without chemicals. Continue reading

What We Can Learn from Bees About Aging

This here is a story about bees, notoriously hard workers. Older bees, that is, which go and take on responsibilities usually doled out to the younger, stronger bees. When you look at the effects on the brains of these older bees, a picture emerges that could have huge effects for people. Another health breakthrough for dementia, anyone? Continue reading

Battle Won against Asian Tiger Mosquito

An experimental research carried out in Sant Cugat del Vallès and Rubí, coordinated by researchers from UAB, assessed the efficacy of a combination of strategies to reduce the population of tiger mosquitos (Aedes albopictus). The research began in February 2008. The research focused on monitoring eggs found in small experimental traps. Researchers observed that for the first time, the number of eggs diminished after applying the measures.

The strategies began with a visit to the affected areas, where owners were informed on prevention measures and told the importance of eliminating any stagnant water accumulating in gardens or patios. The next stage included applying insecticides to plugholes, water storage tanks and drains to eliminate larvae, and removing vegetation from parks and gardens to get rid of adult mosquitos. Continue reading

USDA Identified Bacterial Strain for Crops Control

The Researchers from the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have made an interesting and noteworthy discovery concerning the use of soil bacteria in controlling crop pests. Michael Blackburn, an entomologist at the ARS Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Laboratory in Beltsville, Md., and his colleagues recently found that pest-eliminating strains of soil bacteria with a certain type of enzyme survive better than strains without the enzyme, which means they are ultimately more effective at eliminating pests without the need for much human intervention.

Published in the journal Biological Control, the results of the study represent a significant milestone in understanding natural bacterial pest control. The findings not only expand the viability of using soil  Continue reading