Quercetin and Vitamin D — Allies Against Coronavirus?

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • As the outbreak of COVID-19 continues to spread around the world, more than 80 clinical trials are underway testing remedies ranging from intravenous vitamin C and stem cells to HIV drugs and malaria medication
  • A derivative of quercetin has been shown to provide broad-spectrum protection against a wide range of viruses, including SARS. Canadian and Chinese researchers are now collaborating on a study to assess the effectiveness of quercetin against COVID-19 infection
  • Quercetin is a powerful immune booster and broad-spectrum antiviral. It also inhibits the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be beneficial since serious COVID-19 infection and subsequent death appears to be due to cytokine storm activity
  • While there are no clinical trials investigating vitamin D for coronavirus specifically, there are plenty of data showing it’s an important component in the prevention and treatment of influenza and upper respiratory tract infections
  • Other nutraceuticals thought to be useful in the prevention of coronavirus infection include NAC, spirulina, beta-glucan, glucosamine, selenium, zinc, lipoic acid and sulforaphane

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Essential Nutrition to Protect Yourself From Coronavirus

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • According to bioweapons expert Francis Boyle, evidence suggests COVID-19 is a weaponized coronavirus originating from the Biosafety Level 4 facility in Wuhan City, China
  • COVID-19 appears to be a chimera consisting of SARS (an already weaponized coronavirus), HIV genetic material and influenza virus, designed with gain of function properties that allow it to spread a greater distance than normal
  • Others have suggested COVID-19 may involve Prevotella, a bacterium known to cause respiratory tract infections, and that this may explain some of the observed symptoms and how it can spread through feces
  • RNA sequencing data from Wuhan show millions of Prevotella proteins amid a few thousand COVID-19 viruses. Prevotella bacteria was also found in six COVID-19 patients from the same family in Hong Kong
  • Supplements thought to be useful in the prevention of coronavirus infection include NAC, elderberry, spirulina, beta-glucan, glucosamine, selenium, zinc, lipoic acid, sulforaphane, resveratrol, vitamin D, Bifidobacterium bifidum strain probiotics and sporebiotics

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The Acid That Battles Diabetes Side Effects

About one in five patients with diabetes suffers from diabetic neuropathy — so it is very common. It’s the result of nerve damage by compromised small blood vessels surrounding the nerve. It occurs most frequently in diabetic patients with prolonged high blood sugar levels.

Patients with diabetic neuropathy may experience these symptoms: stabbing pains; burning sensation, especially in the evening; muscle twitching; impaired speech; difficulty swallowing; muscle weakness; dizziness; blurred vision; drooping eyelid; chronic diarrhea; reduced sensation anywhere in the body; and, most commonly, numbness and tingling sensation in the extremities.

In general,  Continue reading

A Supplement for Your Blood Vessels

Lipoic acid, also known as alpha-lipoic acid or thioctic acid, was originally identified as a vitamin more than 50 years ago. It is a naturally occurring chemical made in small amounts by plants, animals and humans. It is also a natural solution for improving the health of your blood vessels. This is the first of two articles explaining how it works.

Though the information is limited, foods rich in lipoic acid include kidney, heart, liver, spinach, tomatoes, peas, and Brussels sprouts. Lipoic acid in dietary supplements varies from 100 to 600 milligrams. In Germany, lipoic acid is available by prescription for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Low blood levels of lipoic acid are found in patients with diabetes, atherosclerosis, and liver cirrhosis.

Lipoic acid has many functions in your body: Continue reading

Antioxidants of Interest to Address Infertility, Erectile Dysfunction

A growing body of evidence suggests that antioxidants may have significant value in addressing infertility issues in both women and men, including erectile dysfunction, and researchers say that large, specific clinical studies are merited to determine how much they could help.

A new analysis, published online in the journal Pharmacological Research, noted that previous studies on the potential for antioxidants to help address this serious and growing problem have been inconclusive, but that other data indicates nutritional therapies may have significant potential.

The researchers also observed that infertility problems are often an early indicator of other degenerative disease issues such as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. The same approaches that may help treat infertility  Continue reading