Research: Ginger Selectively Kills Breast Cancer Cells

New research published in the Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology found that “ginger may be a promising candidate for the treatment of breast carcinomas.”[i]  This is a timely finding, insofar as breast cancer awareness month is only days away, and one of the primary fund-raising justifications is the false concept Continue reading

Iodine Dosages

Treatment of Influenza and other Diseases

After testing over 500 patients, I found that 94.7% of my patients are deficient in inorganic iodine.– Dr. David Brownstein Continue reading

Can Chinese Herbal Medicine Treat Cancer? The Research Says Yes

A large scale review of research by Australia and Chinese University scientists has proved with thousands of studies using hundreds of thousands of cancer patients that Chinese herbal medicine offers significant treatment for most types of cancers – including breast cancer.

The research comes from Australia’s University of Western Sydney and the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine. The researchers analyzed and reviewed 2,964 human clinical studies that involved 253,434 cancer patients. Among these were 2,385 randomized controlled studies and Continue reading

Dogs Can Sniff Out Lung Cancer, Pilot Study Shows

Dogs are surprisingly adept at sniffing out lung cancer, results from a pilot project in Austria published on Wednesday suggested, potentially offering hope for earlier, life-saving diagnosis.

“Dogs have no problem identifying tumor patients,” Continue reading

Roche Warns of Counterfeit Cancer Drug in US

Roche’s Genentech unit said Tuesday that the fake products do not contain the key ingredient in Avastin, which is used to treat cancers of the colon, lung, kidney and brain. The drug is a huge money-maker for Roche, generating about $6 billion a year.

A spokeswoman said the counterfeit drug has been distributed to health care facilities in the U.S., though it’s unclear how many vials are in circulation or where they may be concentrated. The company is working with the Food and Drug Administration to track down the counterfeit vials and analyze their contents.

“We’re still analyzing what it is, we know it doesn’t contain the active ingredient in Avastin,” said Genentech spokeswoman Charlotte Arnold.

Avastin is administered in doctor’s offices and hospitals. Continue reading

Can Vitamin A Actually Battle Cancer?

Vitamin A could help prevent breast cancer. Over a five-year study, retinoids were able to reduce the risk of second breast cancer in premenopausal women. They were given a synthetic vitamin A, called “fenretinide,” at a dose of 200 milligrams (mg) a day. The nutrient may also help protect the liver from cancer. Synthetic vitamin A, acyclic retinoid, prevented the development of a second liver cancer and improved survival in a Japanese report.

It was thought that vitamin A could help prevent lung cancer, the world’s most fatal tumor. But it may in fact be the opposite. Most clinical studies failed to show that vitamin A protected against lung cancer. Then, Continue reading

Drink More Tea, Less Alcohol to Benefit Your Lungs

A 30-year study of 126,293 individuals shows that drinking too much alcohol independently raises your chance of developing lung cancer. The authors noted that low to moderate intake of alcoholic beverages appeared to have no effect on risk.

“We did not see a relationship between moderate drinking and lung cancer development. So it appears probable that most middle-aged and older moderate drinkers have coronary artery protection and no increased risk of lung cancer risk,” said researcher Stanton Siu, M.D.

The scientists also found that women who regularly drank black tea had some level of protection against lung cancer. In both males and females, Continue reading

40 Percent of Cancers Are Preventable

About 40 percent of cancers could be prevented if people stopped smoking and overeating, limited their alcohol, exercised regularly and got vaccines targeting cancer-causing infections, experts say.

To mark World Cancer day on Thursday, officials at the International Union Against Cancer released a report focused on steps that governments and the public can take to avoid the disease.

According to the World Health Organization, cancer is responsible for one out of every eight deaths worldwide — more than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. WHO warned that without major changes, global cancer deaths will jump from about 7.6 million this year to 17 million by 2030.

In the report from the International Union Against Cancer, experts said about 21 percent of all cancers are due to infections like the human papillomavirus, or HPV, which causes cervical cancer, and hepatitis infections that cause stomach and liver cancer.

While the vaccines to prevent these cancers are widely available in western countries, they are almost nonexistent in the developing world. Nearly 80 percent of the world’s cervical cancer deaths are in poor countries, according to the agency.

In Western nations, experts said many of the top cancers like those in the lungs, breasts and colon might be avoided if people changed their lifestyle habits.

Medicare Expands Coverage To Help Smokers Quit

They’ve lived with the health warnings about smoking for much of their lives and doubtless seen the ill effects on friends, relatives and even themselves, yet about 4.5 million older people in the U.S. keep on lighting up. Medicare is finally catching up to most private insurers by providing counseling for anyone on the program who’s trying to kick the habit.

Dr. Barry Straube, Medicare’s chief medical officer, says it’s never too late to quit, even for lifelong smokers.

“The elderly can respond to smoking cessation counseling even if they have been smoking for 30 years or more,” says Straube. “We do know we can see a reduction in the death rate and complications from smoking-related illnesses.” Not only cancer, heart disease and lung problems, which can kill, but also gastric reflux, osteoporosis and other ailments that undermine quality of life.

Smoking-related illnesses cost Medicare tens of billions a year. Straube cites a two-decade estimate of $800 billion, from 1995 through 2015.

Medicare already covers drugs used to help smokers quit, as well as counseling for those who have developed a smoking-related illness. But starting immediately, the program will expand the benefit to cover up to eight counseling sessions a year for people who want to quit.

Next year, such counseling will be free, under a provision in President Barack Obama’s health care law that eliminates co-payments for preventive services.

Older smokers often don’t get as much attention from doctors as do younger ones. “They just figure, ‘Well, it’s too late,'” said Straube, that the damage is already done. That may start to change now.

About one in 10 seniors smoke, compared with one in five people among the U.S. population as a whole. It turns out that smokers age 65 and older present a medical paradox.

Many started when it was fashionable to light up. They are more likely than younger smokers to be seriously hooked on nicotine and less likely to attempt quitting. But research shows that their odds of success are greater if they do try to give up the habit.

Older smokers who receive counseling are significantly more likely to quit than those who only get standard medical care. One study of elderly heart attack patients found that those who got counseling to help quit smoking were more likely to be alive five years later.

It’s unclear why older people who try to quit have better luck than younger smokers.

Some experts think it’s because older smokers are more motivated, perhaps from having seen a loved one die of cancer or heart disease, or by recognizing how the cigarette habit has left its mark in their own bodies, anything from wrinklier skin to shortness of breath.

Straube has his own theory: “They’re under less stress,” he said. “They are not working anymore, and they have more time.”

Medicare’s new smoking cessation benefit will also be available to younger people who are covered by the program because of a disability. About 1 million of them are smokers.

Nicotine Binding, Breast Cancer Linked

A researcher in Taipei says nicotine may play a role in promoting breast cancer.

 Yuan-Soon Ho of the Taipei Medical University and colleagues looked at how nicotine acts on the molecular level.

 They find human breast cancer cells consistently produced the alpha 9 subunit of the nicotine acetylcholine receptor — known to promote smoking addiction — and that expression was higher in advanced-stage breast cancer compared with early-stage cancer.

 The study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, suggests nicotine binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor may also directly promote the development of breast cancer.

 Ho and colleagues studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptor cancer cells by looking at 276 breast tumor samples from anonymous donors to the Taipei Medical University Hospital.

 “These results imply that receptor-mediated carcinogenic signals play a decisive role in biological functions related to human breast cancer development,” the researchers say in a statement.

Radon Gas the Second Leading Cause of Lung Cancer

BUCHAREST – A new study has shown that radon gas, generated by the decay of uranium, is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking.

The odorless and tasteless gas is generated by decay of uranium-238 (a natural radioactive element present in all rocks and soil in varying degrees).

The radon gas is emitted by the subsoil and seeps into houses – to a greater or lesser degree depending upon the permeability of the ground – through the pores and cracks in garages and basements.

The researchers from the University of Cantabria and the Romanian Babes-Bolyai University studied the exposure to this element in a uranium mining area in Transylvania and in an area of granite in Torrelodones, Madrid.

The authors estimated the death rate due to lung cancer attributable to radon and smoking in the areas between 1994 and 2006.

The result was double that which would have been expected based on a relative risk report produced in 2006 for the whole of Europe on cancer incidence and mortality.

“The study shows that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, after smoking, as has also been shown by many other studies carried out over the years in various parts of the world”, Carlos Sainz, co-author of the study and a researcher for the Ionizing Radiation Group at the University of Cantabria, told SINC.

“It is much more abundant in granite areas, such as Torrelodones and other areas in the west of the Iberian Peninsula, such as parts of Galicia, Salamanca and Cáceres”, he added.

The study conducted in Transylvania, Romania, where there are old uranium mines, showed higher incidence of lung cancer, almost 116.82pct higher than estimates.

The researchers suggest regular checking of gas levels along with ventilating cellars and basements with extractor fans (opening windows alone may not be sufficient, depending on the levels of the gas).

The construction of architectural barriers that are impermeable to radon is also recommended, above all in newly-built houses.

Breathalyzer Screening may Help Spot Lung Cancer Early

HAIFA –  Israeli scientists have come up with a device that can help spot lung cancer molecules on the breath of patients.

Dr. Hossam Haick and colleagues at Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa think that the technology may lead to pocket-friendly, portable breath-test devices with the potential to save large numbers of lives by detecting cancer early.

“Our results show great promise for fast, easy and cost-effective diagnosis and screening of lung cancer,” the Independent quoted them as having written in a research paper, published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

“The developed devices are expected to be relatively inexpensive, portable, and amenable to use in widespread screening, making them potentially valuable in saving millions of lives every year,” they added.

For their study, the researchers took breath samples from 40 diagnosed patients and 56 healthy individuals.

They observed that the device, when tested, made an easy distinction between simulated “healthy” and “cancerous” breath made from artificial compound mixtures.