44 Reasons Cell Phones Can Cause Cancer

 

Cell phones emit microwave radio-frequency radiation. Fact. Continue reading

Booming New Cannabis Industry Faces an Abundance of Hurdles

Story at-a-glance −

Many new state laws conflict with federal drug laws when it comes to pot, which creates problems for the industry and its consumers Continue reading

Marijuana Research Supports Its Safety and Benefits

Story at-a-glance −

Israel is the marijuana research capital of the world, thanks to the work of Dr. Raphael Mechoulam who’s spent his entire career studying the health benefits of cannabis Continue reading

Research: Ginger Selectively Kills Breast Cancer Cells

New research published in the Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology found that “ginger may be a promising candidate for the treatment of breast carcinomas.”[i]  This is a timely finding, insofar as breast cancer awareness month is only days away, and one of the primary fund-raising justifications is the false concept Continue reading

Research: A Tsp. of Aloe Daily Reverses Signs of Skin Aging

There is plenty of research that indicates that the unnaturally accelerated aging process associated with modern living and/or natural environmental exposures such as excessive ultraviolet radiation (photo-aging) can be slowed. In fact, over 150 natural substances have been indexed on aging in the GreenMedInfo.com project with Continue reading

Use Old Fashion Black Salve for Serious Skin Conditions

black salve**Please Note**much of the info below was received from Alpha Omega Labs, a company that sold black salve under the commercial name “Cansema” which was very successful in treating skin cancers before the FDA shut them down. There are a select few quality black salves that are still on the market today. Continue reading

Gossypin

hibiscusDid You Know…

…this plant extract can treat the deadliest kind of skin cancer?

Melanoma, the least common form of skin cancer, is also the most deadly.  That’s why it’s so exciting to know that a new study published in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics in April of 2013 Continue reading

Zithromax and Januvia: Two Commonly-Prescribed Drugs Now Shown to Be Killing Patients

Story at glance:

The US FDA is investigating a potential link between a commonly used class of diabetes drugs known as DPP-4 inhibitors and pre-cancerous changes to the pancreas. Additionally, previous studies have also indicated a connection of thyroid, colon, melanoma, and prostate cancer

The Canadian Cancer Society and Neutrogena: Partners

Cosmetics giant Neutrogena, whose parent company Johnson & Johnson has allowed the use of potentially cancer-causing chemicals in their products (and only announced in August 2012 that they would be removing them by the end of 2015), has taken on Continue reading

Sun Exposure Lowers Cancer Risk

 A study that correlated exposure to sunlight with cancer risk found that people exposed to more sunlight had a significantly lower risk of many types of cancer (Lin, 2012). This study followed more than 450,000 white, non-Hispanic subjects aged 50-71 years from diverse geographic areas in the US. Researchers correlated the calculated ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in these different areas with the incidence of a variety of cancers. The diverse sites included six states Continue reading

Why you May Want to Choose an Alternative Organic Sunscreen

This time of year, people are going to pools, water parks, and golfing, riding horses, and enjoying time at lakes and beaches. Many people are enjoying the sun for the vitamin D benefits. Enjoying the sun can also restore optimal levels of melatonin in the brain. Summer is a time in which to respect the sun and to understand the chemicals and possible side effects of various sunscreens. It is also a time to examine alternatives to toxic sunscreens.

Many individuals use sunscreen to protect the skin from a sunburn, premature aging, and skin cancer. However, what if the sunscreen itself caused other physical issues? What if different companies are touting their ‘safe’ and effective sunscreens, but they are not warning the public that it also contains chemicals that disrupt hormones and the thyroid and can cause skin issues? If the companies did advertise this, it would disrupt their monetary flow. Again, it seems that money is the motivating factor here, rather than the truth.

A few chemicals that are listed as ingredients in some sunscreens are Homosalate, Octinoxate, and Oxybenzone. Different companies  Continue reading

Tanning Beds Boost Vitamin D Production

The FDA has the media and subsequently many Americans in a (perhaps unjustified) uproar about teens using tanning beds, and they are now pushing to ban tanning for people under 18. It is time to set some of this witch-hunting straight.

The ruckus comes in the wake of a report that was released last year by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the World Health Organization. The report resulted in the IARC’s changing the status of tanning beds from ‘possibly carcinogenic’ to ‘carcinogenic.’

With the same argumentation and evidence, the sun itself would fall into that category.

The media definitely talks about it as a danger,  Continue reading

Safest Sunscreen to Use is Nano Zinc Oxide

The debate about sunscreens rages on. Dermatologists advise slathering up every day. Nutritionists and holistic doctors advise sun exposure to get vitamin D. Some even say sunscreens cause cancer, and a disturbing study showed that people who used more commercial sunscreen had more melanoma.

Where is the truth? We might never know. Sunscreen manufacturers need to sell their product and natural sunscreen companies have little money for research. The FDA is mute and has never said that sunscreens prevent skin cancer. It is clear that commercial sunscreen ingredients (like oxybenzone and methoxycinnamate) are potent hormone disruptors and potential carcinogens. My advice is to never use these commercial sunscreens.

What should you do? Be judicious and safe. Get sun exposure. It is the best and most reliable source of vitamin D. But avoid sunburn, which damages the skin and may increase your risk of skin cancer. Avoid baking in the sun at midday, especially those first days of summer or your beach vacation. Gradually build your tan. Wear a hat to protect your face from sunburn.

If your kids are at camp or swimming  Continue reading

Zebra Fish Model Of Human Melanoma Reveals New Cancer Gene

Looking at the dark stripes on the tiny zebra fish you might not expect that they hold a potentially important clue for discovering a treatment for the deadly skin disease melanoma. Yet melanocytes, the same cells that are responsible for the pigmentation of zebra fish stripes and for human skin color, are also where melanoma originates. Craig Ceol, PhD, assistant professor of molecular medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and collaborators at several institutions, used zebra fish to identify a new gene responsible for promoting melanoma. In a paper featured on the cover of the March 24 issue of Nature, Dr. Ceol and colleagues describe the melanoma-promoting gene SETDB1. Continue reading

Infrared Device Tested to Detect Melanoma Early

Scientists from Johns Hopkins are testing an infrared device to help detect skin cancer, the most deadly of which is melanoma that affects 68,720 individuals annually according to the National Cancer Institute. Melanoma can kill, and the infrared device could have profound benefits for detecting skin cancer early and non-invasively.

Finding melanoma is not easy, and relies on appearance such as dark color, irregular edges, and changes in skin moles that may have been present for years. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis. Melanoma can also hide under the fingernails, in the groin, on the scalp, and on the back where many individuals may neglect to look.

“The problem with diagnosing melanoma in the year 2010 is that we don’t have any objective way to diagnose this disease,” said Rhoda Alani, adjunct professor at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and professor and chair of dermatology at the Boston University School of Medicine. “Our goal is to give an objective measurement as to whether a lesion may be malignant. It could take much of the guesswork out of screening patients for skin cancer.”

The infrared device uses a unique way to detect melanoma. Cancer cells on the skin emit more heat than healthy tissue, but the difference is very subtle. The researchers at Johns Hopkins first cool the skin with compressed air, then record temperature changes in the suspicious area over two to three minutes. Cancer cells reheat more quickly. Then images are captured on camera.

“The system is actually very simple. An infrared image is similar to the images seen through night-vision goggles. In this medical application, the technology itself is noninvasive; the only inconvenience to the patient is the cooling”, says heat transfer expert Cila Herman, a professor of mechanical engineering in Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering who has teamed up with Dr. Alani for the project. The current study has enrolled 50 patients to determine if the infrared system can work for finding melanoma early.

“Obviously, there is a lot of work to do,” Herman said. “We need to fine-tune the instrument — the scanning system and the software — and develop diagnostic criteria for cancerous lesions. When the research and refinement are done, we hope to be able to show that our system can find melanoma at an early stage before it spreads and becomes dangerous to the patient.”

Dr. Alani is optimistic, but cautiously so. She warns that the infrared device would not replace a dermatologist’s diagnosis for suspicion of melanoma, but envisions “that this will be useful as a tool in helping to diagnose early-stage melanoma.” The hand held device could also be developed into a full body scanner to screen patients with multiple skin lesions for melanoma that when detected early would save lives. So far, all of the melanomas in the patients studied were detected with the infrared scanner.