Scientists Uncover Garlic’s Bacteria-Killing Abilities

For centuries, cooks have known that garlic appears to have preservative properties. Now, researchers at Washington State University, Pullman, discovered exactly what compounds found in the bulb give it its protective nature.

Scientists had previously believed that garlic’s phenolic compounds were responsible for its bacteria-killing properties. However, using a combination of spectroscopy technologies, the team found that organosulfur is able to penetrate bacteria membranes.

“Our result demonstrated that the garlic-derived organosulfur compounds have the potential to be used as antimicrobial agents,” said co-author Xiaonan Lu.

In the trial, the researchers used the microbe campylobacter jejun because it’s a common cause of bacterial food poisoning, leading to abdominal cramps, fever, diarrhea and blood problems. Continue reading

Natural Alternatives to Cancer Treatments

The diagnosis of cancer doesn’t always have to necessitate debilitating treatments in a hospital. Available options include in-home protocols that some licensed practicing physicians offer their patients who want to try to beat cancer naturally.

Gerson Therapy Protocol

The German physician, Max B. Gerson, M.D., developed this highly acclaimed protocol. This therapy entails consuming 13 glasses of fresh, raw carrot/apple and green-leaf juices prepared hourly from fresh, organic fruits and vegetables and three full vegetarian meals, freshly prepared from organically grown fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

It includes these medications: Continue reading

Migraine Sufferers More Vulnerable to Hangover

JEFFERSON – Migraine sufferers may be more vulnerable to an alcohol-induced headache after a night of drinking, according to researchers.

Until now, studying the mechanism behind migraine and other forms of recurrent headaches has not been possible in an animal model, says Michael Oshinsky, assistant Neurology professor at Jefferson Medical College (JMC).

Oshinsky developed a rat model in which headaches are induced by repeatedly stimulating, over weeks to months, the brain’s dura mater with an inflammatory mixture. Dura mater is the outermost, toughest, and most fibrous of the three membranes covering the brain and spinal cord.

Oshinsky and Christina Maxwell, doctoral student in the neuroscience programme, used their model to study the effects of alcohol on rats who suffer recurrent migraines, compared to rats free of headaches.

Such headaches are associated with hypersensitivity to light, sound and touch on the head and face. Researchers, using four groups of rats, measured their sensitivity to touch around the eye. They monitored the change in pain threshold of the face resulting from the repeated dural stimulation.

“Our results suggest that dehydration or impurities in alcohol are not responsible for hangover headache,” Oshinsky said.

“Since these rats were sufficiently hydrated and the alcohol they received contained no impurities, the alcohol itself or a metabolite must be causing the hangover-like headache. These data confirm the clinical observation that people with migraine are more susceptible to alcohol-induced headaches.”

Oshinsky and his lab are now also studying the mechanism for the induction of headache, and also the metabolites of alcohol that cause hangover, said a JMC release.

The study was presented at Neuroscience 2009, the Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, in Chicago.