Research: Carbon Nanotubes Can Act as Implanted Sensors Long-Term

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Carbon nanotubes can act as sensors for up to a year when implanted under the skin or injected into the bloodstream for short-term monitoring, according to new research published at Nature Nanotechnology.

The sensors take advantage of carbon nanotubes’ natural fluorescence, which brightens or dims when coupled to a molecule that binds to a specific target. For this study, researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology focused on nitric oxide which is produced during inflammation and has a role in cancer that’s not well understood. Continue reading

Suzanne Somers’ ‘Bombshell’ Redefines Aging

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In her new book, Suzanne Somers reveals the secrets behind some cutting-edge medical advances that she believes could revolutionize the way we think about getting older.

Suzanne Somers is 65 years old, but you’d never know it from looking at her.

Somers, an actress, author, Continue reading

Human Race Being Terminated by ‘Scientific Suicide’

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This is, without question, the most important article I’ve ever penned, because it discusses the idea that the human race is being destroyed in the name of science.

Stopping these “scientists” from destroying our world and our civilization must become our top priority if we hope to survive.

The entire Northern hemisphere is now imminently threatened by a massive, “global killer” radiation release from failing Fukushima reactor No. 4. Continue reading

A New Therapy without Side Effects Could Improve Dramatically Chemotherapy Treatments

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This significant progress –based on nanotechnology– has been achieved by researchers of the universities of Granada, Edimbourgh and Kebangsaan (Malaisie). This therapy is based on the encapsulation of a catalyst (palladium) into microspheres, to synthesize artificial materials or activate drugs into human cells, thus avoiding any toxicity.

Researchers of the University of Granada and Edimbourgh have developed a new therapy for cancer based on nanotechnology that might improve significantly chemotherapy, as it has not caused side effects.

This therapy is based on the encapsulation of a catalyst (palladium) into microspheres, to synthesize artificial materials or activate drugs within human cells, thus avoiding any toxicity. This system captures palladium within its microstructure. Continue reading

Nanoparticles Damage Healthy Soil Bacteria

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Though some might argue that nanotechnology offers benefits not afforded by normal molecules, the environmental and human health consequences of this “breakthrough” technology appear dire, to say the least. New research published in the Journal of Hazardous Materials explains that nanoparticles damage beneficial soil bacteria and ultimately ruin plants’ ability to uptake necessary nitrogen.

Researchers Niraj Kumar and Virginia Walker from Queen’s University in Canada set out to investigate the effects of nanoparticles in the environment, comparing soil from the Arctic — which they believed would be the least contaminated with nanoparticles — to soil that was deliberately contaminated with various nanoparticles, including silver nanoparticles. Continue reading

An Implantable Antenna Made of Silk Alerts Doctors of Disease

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Silk and gold, usually a pairing for the runways of Milan, are now the main ingredients for a new kind of implantable biosensor. Researchers at Tufts University have crafted a small antenna from liquid silk and micropatterned gold. The antenna is designed to spot specific proteins and chemicals in the body, and alert doctors wirelessly to signs of disease. Scientists say the implant could someday help patients with diabetes track their glucose levels without having to test themselves daily.

Silky sensor: A biosensor made from silk and gold can pick up tiny signals from proteins and chemicals in the body. Researchers patterned gold over a silk film and wrapped it into a capsule shape to form a small antenna.

According to Fiorenzo Omenetto, professor of biomedical engineering at Tufts University, silk is a natural platform for medical implants–it’s biocompatible, and while it’s delicate and pliable, it’s also tougher than Kevlar. Implanted in the body, silk can conform to any tissue surface, and, unlike conventional polymer-based implants, it could stay in place over a long period of time without adverse effects. Omenetto has previously taken advantage of these properties to mold silk into tiny chips and flexible meshes, pairing the material with transistors to track molecules, and with electrodes to monitor brain activity.

Now Omenetto is exploring the combination of silk and metamaterials–metals like gold, copper, and silver manipulated at the micro- and nanoscale to exhibit electromagnetic characteristics not normally found in nature. For example, scientists have created metamaterials that act as “invisibility cloaks” by manipulating metals to bend light all the way around an object, rendering it invisible.

Omenetto and his colleague Richard Averitt, associate professor of physics at Boston University, used similar principles to create a metamaterial that’s responsive not to visible light, but rather to frequencies further down the electromagnetic spectrum, within the terahertz range. Not coincidentally, proteins, enzymes, and chemicals in the body are naturally resonant at terahertz frequencies, and, according to Averitt, each biological agent has its own terahertz “signature.”

Terahertz science is a new and growing field, and several research groups are investigating specific protein “T-ray” signatures. A silk metamaterial antenna could someday pick up these specific signals and then send a wireless signal to a computer, to report on chemical levels and monitor disease.

To engineer the responsive end of such an antenna, the team first created a biocompatible base by boiling down silk and pouring the liquid solution into a centimeter-square film. The researchers then sprayed gold onto the silk film, using tiny stencils to create different patterns all along the film. Each area of the film responds to a different terahertz frequency depending on the shape of the gold pattern. The team then wrapped the patterned film around a capsule to form an antenna.

To test its performance, Omenetto and Averitt subjected the antenna to terahertz radiation and found that the antenna was resonant at specific frequencies. Going a step further, the researchers implanted the antenna in several layers of muscle tissue from a pig, and still detected a terahertz signal.

“We’ll try to sense something next and maybe put the antenna in contact with something we’d like to detect, like glucose,” says Omenetto. “We’ll see if we can replicate a proof of principle, and try to add some meaning to the resonance.”

Rajesh Naik, a materials science expert at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, says the research has great practical potential.

“Proteins and other molecules can be entrapped within silk films, allowing one to monitor in-vivo chemical reactions,” says Naik. “Similar resonating structures can be patterned onto other polymeric materials, but silk has an added advantage of being biocompatible.”

Nano Lotion Curbs Burns Infection Thousand Times

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DETROIT – Treating second-degree burns with a nano-emulsion lotion sharply curbs bacterial growth that otherwise can jeopardise recovery.

Experiments show that it reduced bacterial growth a thousandfold compared to control animals receiving no treatment or a placebo.

The lotion also showed a similar reduction when compared to a topical anti-microbial agent commonly used in people with burns.

Plastic surgeons used the nano-emulsion to treat partial thickness (second degree) burns over 20 percent of the body.

The nano-emulsion shows promise in overcoming the limitations of current creams used in burns treatment, which aren’t able to penetrate skin to kill sub-surface bacteria, says Mark R. Hemmila, associate professor of surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS), who led the study.

The nano-emulsion is made of soybean oil, alcohol, water and detergents emulsified into droplets less than 400 nanometres in diameter. It has proved effective at killing a variety of bacteria, fungi and viruses in previous research.

Before the burn treatment can be tested in people, further laboratory studies are needed to examine its effects on the overall healing process, says an UMMS release.

The patented nanoemulsion technology is licensed by U-M to NanoBio Corporation.

These findings were presented at the Interscience Conference for Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.