To Sleep Better, Spend More Time in the Dark

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Virtually every organ in your body has its own circadian clock, and to keep them all in sync, you need to keep a regular waking and sleeping schedule that is linked to the rising and setting of the sun Continue reading

7 Proven Ways to Keep Your Brain Young

Alzheimer’s disease affects about 5.3 million Americans. It’s the leading cause of dementia and the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S.  And it’s growing at an alarming rate.  Already 13% of people over 65 have been diagnosed with the disease.  An astounding 43% of those over the age of 85 are victims.[i] Continue reading

Adrenal Fatigue Symptoms and Seven Ways to Support and Heal your Adrenal Glands

In our modern world, adrenal fatigue is extremely common and estimated by some experts to affect approximately 80 percent of the population to some degree. Adrenal fatigue is caused by all types of stress – physical and emotional – and if left unchecked, it can lead to other illnesses such as type 2 diabetes, thyroid disease and heart attack. Continue reading

How Food Could Help You Quit Smoking

fruitsandSmoking cessation is a truly difficult task. The pull of nicotine can be epically strong. A new health breakthrough has found a very interesting — and healthful — method for helping kick the habit. Eat more fruits and vegetables.

Doing so many Continue reading

Lobelia also Known as Indian Tobacco

Overview:

Lobelia (Lobelia inflata), also called Indian tobacco, has a long history of use as an herbal remedy for respiratory conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, and cough. Historically, Native Americans smoked lobelia as a treatment for asthma. In the 19th century, American physicians prescribed lobelia to induce vomiting in order remove toxins from the body. Continue reading

Wheatgrass

Did You Know…

… that wheatgrass rejuvenates aging cells and helps fight tumors, cleanse the blood and tighten loose and sagging skin?

Say what you will about the taste, which can be chased away with something fruity and sweet, wheatgrass is total body nutrition in one gulp. Prominent research scientist Dr. Earp-Thomas says that,“15 pounds of wheatgrass is the equivalent of 350 pounds of carrots, lettuce, celery and so forth.”

Made up of 17 essential amino acids, 90 minerals, 13 vitamins and 80 enzymes, Continue reading

Biotech Ideas That Will Change the World:

Patrick Cox

For Patrick Cox, disruptive technologies drive change and harbor opportunity. Cox, editor of Breakthrough Technology Alert and Technology Profits Confidential, and a contributor to The Daily Reckoning, strives to find novel ideas in small-cap companies that are off investors’ radar screens. In this exclusive interview with The Life Sciences Report, Cox reveals—in his characteristic none-too-shy style—where he believes investors can find huge returns in biotech companies that will change the world. Continue reading

Even More Benefits Found in Green Tea

Green tea is known for its ability to protect against tumor growth and fight high cholesterol, which can lead to heart disease. In the latest health news, green tea has been found to have yet another feather in its health preventative cap: researchers say that the tea is an excellent remedy for the good health of your teeth and mouth.

Israeli researchers investigated green tea’s polyphenol antioxidants and their ability to benefit oral health. Don’t like the dentist? Hate when you get a cavity and the dentist gets the drill out? Well, green tea could have the ability to protect against bacterial-induced dental cavities, according to the research team.

The polyphenols in green tea also possess antiviral properties, which could help protect Continue reading

A Method to Quit Smoking that Really Works – Organic Tobacco

Before tobacco was polluted with somewhere between 1,000 and 4,000 chemicals, anyone could quit the habit, even cold turkey without help, but because today’s premium brands have juiced up the nicotine so high, it seems to take a small miracle to cure someone of smoking. (http://www.keepitsacred.org/network…)

In fact, the majority of smokers light up just to feel normal, and catch a little bit of stimulation or relaxation; however, even after quitting a smoker’s organs and central nervous system remain poisoned from the chemicals for up to 12 months. This sickened state is what drives smokers back looking for relief, not the “nicotine addiction.” (http://medicolegal.tripod.com/preve…)

The history Continue reading

Eat Fewer Tomatoes to Reduce Arthritis Symptoms

“If nightshades can be eaten or used sparingly, arthritis can be slowed in developing.” The Arthritis Nightshades Research Foundation

Summer gardens are bringing forth an abundance of nightshade foods destined for your dinner plate, your fresh tomato salad, or scattered across a slice of hot cheesy pizza with peppers. Nightshades or the Solanaceae family, cover some 2,800 species of plants, herbs, shrubs and trees, but the nightshade foods you most often consume include: Continue reading

Taking the Burn Out of Heartburn Naturally

According to the National Institute of Health, approximately 25 million Americans are suffering from heartburn each year. With such a large number of the population afflicted with this painful and potentially dangerous health problem, chances are that you are represented in this statistic. Over the past decade pharmaceutical companies have lead us to believe that the cause of this heartburn epidemic is an overproduction of stomach acid and doctors are writing millions of “acid blocker” prescriptions each year aimed at easing the symptoms of acid reflux. Ironically however, low stomach acid levels, not excessive levels, may very well be causing your heartburn. And furthermore, the very act of “blocking” your stomach acid production can have disastrous consequences for your health down the road.

Acid reflux is often incorrectly thought of as a stomach acid disease, but actually it is the result of a malfunctioning muscle called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The LES is a flap that separates the base of the esophagus from the top of the stomach and opens only to allow food and liquids to pass down or vomit or gas to pass up. When the LES is functioning properly it will remain closed at all other times, sealing off the esophagus from the harmful acids in the stomach. When the LES is malfunctioning however, the corrosive stomach acids are able to make their way into the esophagus where they burn  Continue reading

Medicare Expands Coverage To Help Smokers Quit

They’ve lived with the health warnings about smoking for much of their lives and doubtless seen the ill effects on friends, relatives and even themselves, yet about 4.5 million older people in the U.S. keep on lighting up. Medicare is finally catching up to most private insurers by providing counseling for anyone on the program who’s trying to kick the habit.

Dr. Barry Straube, Medicare’s chief medical officer, says it’s never too late to quit, even for lifelong smokers.

“The elderly can respond to smoking cessation counseling even if they have been smoking for 30 years or more,” says Straube. “We do know we can see a reduction in the death rate and complications from smoking-related illnesses.” Not only cancer, heart disease and lung problems, which can kill, but also gastric reflux, osteoporosis and other ailments that undermine quality of life.

Smoking-related illnesses cost Medicare tens of billions a year. Straube cites a two-decade estimate of $800 billion, from 1995 through 2015.

Medicare already covers drugs used to help smokers quit, as well as counseling for those who have developed a smoking-related illness. But starting immediately, the program will expand the benefit to cover up to eight counseling sessions a year for people who want to quit.

Next year, such counseling will be free, under a provision in President Barack Obama’s health care law that eliminates co-payments for preventive services.

Older smokers often don’t get as much attention from doctors as do younger ones. “They just figure, ‘Well, it’s too late,'” said Straube, that the damage is already done. That may start to change now.

About one in 10 seniors smoke, compared with one in five people among the U.S. population as a whole. It turns out that smokers age 65 and older present a medical paradox.

Many started when it was fashionable to light up. They are more likely than younger smokers to be seriously hooked on nicotine and less likely to attempt quitting. But research shows that their odds of success are greater if they do try to give up the habit.

Older smokers who receive counseling are significantly more likely to quit than those who only get standard medical care. One study of elderly heart attack patients found that those who got counseling to help quit smoking were more likely to be alive five years later.

It’s unclear why older people who try to quit have better luck than younger smokers.

Some experts think it’s because older smokers are more motivated, perhaps from having seen a loved one die of cancer or heart disease, or by recognizing how the cigarette habit has left its mark in their own bodies, anything from wrinklier skin to shortness of breath.

Straube has his own theory: “They’re under less stress,” he said. “They are not working anymore, and they have more time.”

Medicare’s new smoking cessation benefit will also be available to younger people who are covered by the program because of a disability. About 1 million of them are smokers.

Nicotine Binding, Breast Cancer Linked

A researcher in Taipei says nicotine may play a role in promoting breast cancer.

 Yuan-Soon Ho of the Taipei Medical University and colleagues looked at how nicotine acts on the molecular level.

 They find human breast cancer cells consistently produced the alpha 9 subunit of the nicotine acetylcholine receptor — known to promote smoking addiction — and that expression was higher in advanced-stage breast cancer compared with early-stage cancer.

 The study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, suggests nicotine binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor may also directly promote the development of breast cancer.

 Ho and colleagues studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptor cancer cells by looking at 276 breast tumor samples from anonymous donors to the Taipei Medical University Hospital.

 “These results imply that receptor-mediated carcinogenic signals play a decisive role in biological functions related to human breast cancer development,” the researchers say in a statement.