Northeast Biggest User of Telemedicine

ontaTelemedicine is helping to overcome the vast geography and human resource challenges of Northern Ontario, health professionals heard at the Northern Telemedicine Forum Oct. 30.

“We’ve expanded the number of Northern telemedicine sites – now 261 in the northeast region,” Continue reading

A Triple Threat for Beating the Flu Season

Here’s some health news for those of you who seem to suffer every time the flu goes around: vitamin c, Echinacea, and zinc lozenges are the three best alternative therapies out there when it comes to beating the flu and the common cold. This latest bit of health advice comes courtesy of researchers at the Seekers Centre for Integrative Medicine in Ontario, Canada.

To see how well various alternative therapies have been holding up when it comes to preventing the flu and the common cold, the Canadian researchers scanned MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. They searched from January 1966 to September 2009, combining the key words/phrases “common cold” or “influenza” with the words “Echinacea,” “garlic,” “ginseng,” “probiotics,” “vitamin C,” and zinc. Clinical trials and prospective studies were included.

Not surprisingly, they found that vitamin C demonstrated the largest benefit for prevention when it came to fighting the flu and colds. Continue reading

Researchers Solicit Cheap eHealth Alternative

Free software is secure, creators say

Researchers at Hamilton’s McMaster University say they have devised an electronic medical records system that can be implemented by physicians across Ontario for two per cent of the money the provincial government has spent on eHealth Ontario.

The web-based program, dubbed OSCAR, organizes medical records and can be set up on any computer system with a browser. It was first created in 2001, and has attracted more users each year.

Around 600 doctors across the country — including 450 family physicians in Ontario — currently use the software.

The software is open-source, which means users are allowed access to its basic code. Users are free to add to or modify the software without fear of legal repercussions, as long they abide by the conditions of the General Public Licence, which stipulates that the program must remain open and sharable.

Because it’s open-source, OSCAR is free. The costs to set it up come in the form of servers, hardware and support staff.

“In Ontario, there are approximately 8,000 family physicians that are not using electronic medical record systems. All these physicians could have OSCAR implemented within the next 24 months, and the cost would be less than $20 million,” Dr. David Price, chair of family medicine at McMaster’s medical school, said in a release.

While the software would be able to cover all the family physicians in Ontario, it is not as comprehensive in scope as eHealth, which is charged with linking all healthcare facilities, including hospitals and clinics, not just family doctors.

$1B spent already

Yet it can still help in digitizing Ontario’s medical records, said Dr. David Chan, who developed the software.

He said Ontario’s approach to building a health-record system is wrong. The province spent some $1 billion commissioning eHealth Ontario to produce an electronic medical database.

But in a report released Wednesday, Ontario Auditor General Jim McCarter said the province had wasted that investment and eHealth had little to show for its work.

We really don’t need to spend that kind of money. I think the government’s paranoia about building … a secure network is hugely expensive,” Chan said Friday.

People often get concerned about the security risks of open-source software, but Chan said it has passed stringent provincial security tests. It is no more vulnerable to hackers than more expensive proprietary software, he said.