Top 7 Natural Arthritis Cream Products at Your Drugstore

Topical arthritis cream products are preparations applied to the skin. Many of the arthritis cream products can be purchased over-the-counter. Effective for soothing minor arthritis and muscle pain, some of the arthritis cream products contain the active ingredient salicylate, while others are based on the pain-relieving effect of capsaicin or menthol.

1. Zostrix Arthritis Cream

Research has shown this arthritis cream works by reducing levels of substance P, a chemical involved in transmitting pain impulses to the brain. When applied to the surface of the skin, it has a pain-relieving effect. Active ingredient is capsaicin.

Offers temporary relief of minor joint and muscle pain. An arthritis cream which has lasted the test of time. Active ingredients found in this arthritis cream are methyl salicylate and menthol.

3. Aspercreme

Arthritis cream temporarily relieves minor pain associated with arthritis, simple backache, muscle strains, and muscle sprains. Active ingredient of this cream is trolamine salicylate.

4. Icy Hot

Topical arthritis formula has dual action – gets icy to dull the pain and then gets hot to relax it away. Fast, long-lasting pain relief for sore muscles, backache, muscle cramps, and joint pain. Active ingredients are methyl salicylate and menthol.

5. Sportscreme

Arthritis cream provides fast, temporary relief from minor pain associated with sore muscles, muscle strain and stiffness. This cream does not smell like medicine. Active ingredient is salicylate.

6. Tiger Balm

Has a soothing action that relieves muscular aches and joint pain. Made from active ingredients such as camphor, menthol, cajuput oil and clove oil.

7. Mineral Ice

Cool, greaseless, pain relieving gel penetrates deep to provide fast, temporary relief of minor aches and pains of muscles and joints. Active ingredient is menthol.

Childhood Physical Abuse Linked To Arthritis, Study Finds

TORONTO  — Adults who had experienced physical abuse as children have 56 per cent higher odds of osteoarthritis compared to those who have not been abused, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers.

University of Toronto researchers investigated the relationship between self-reported childhood physical abuse and a diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA). After analyzing representative data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, the researchers determined a significant association between childhood physical abuse and osteoarthritis in adulthood.

The study is published in the November issue of the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

Osteoarthritis is an often debilitating chronic condition that affects millions of adults. “We found that 10.2 per cent of those with osteoarthritis reported they had been physically abused as children in comparison to 6.5 per cent of those without osteoarthritis,” says lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson of U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and Department of Family and Community Medicine. “This study provides further support for the need to investigate the possible role that childhood abuse plays in the development of chronic illness.”

Co-author Sarah Brennenstuhl, a doctoral student at the University of Toronto, stated that, “We were surprised that the significant association between childhood physical abuse and osteoarthritis persisted even after controlling for major potentially confounding factors such as obesity, physical activity levels as well as age, gender, income and race.”

According to Fuller-Thomson, one important avenue for future research is to investigate the pathways through which arthritis may develop as a consequence of childhood physical abuse.