What makes dogs so special? Science says love

True love: a woman and her Valentine’s Day date pose behind a heart-shaped pastry during a February 14 Continue reading

Fun Facts about Hugging

Story at-a-glance 

Hugging increases levels of the “love hormone” oxytocin, which is beneficial for stress levels, heart health, and more

A 20-second hug reduces the harmful physical effects of stress, including its impact on your blood pressure and heart rate Continue reading

The Evidence For and Against Birth Induction

Abstract: Smith (2003) found unexplained stillbirth occurs once in 2000 births (0.5/1000) after 34 weeks among low risk second pregnancies, following a first vaginal birth in the absence of induction for postdates.  If induction for postdates could prevent stillbirth by expediting the deliver, one would expect to save 0.5/1000.   Four systematic reviews performing meta-analysis of the data regarding the effect of induction for postdates draw three different conclusions.  Cochrane (2012) concludes that inducing at 41 weeks can prevent 1 stillbirth/perinatal death for Continue reading

Do You Know About the “Love Hormone?”

If the table’s all set for your Valentine’s Day dinner, then you’ve prescribed yourself one of the best treatments to help reduce your stress and even improve your physical health: love.

Oxytocin, often referred to as the “love hormone,” is a neuropeptide that is released by the pituitary gland. Continue reading

Suzanne Somers’ ‘Bombshell’ Redefines Aging

In her new book, Suzanne Somers reveals the secrets behind some cutting-edge medical advances that she believes could revolutionize the way we think about getting older.

Suzanne Somers is 65 years old, but you’d never know it from looking at her.

Somers, an actress, author, Continue reading

Strangers Can Spot ‘Kindness’ Gene: Study

People with a certain gene trait are known to be more kind and caring than people without it, and strangers can quickly tell the difference, according to US research published on Monday. Continue reading

The Watermelon You Should Never, Ever Eat

Watermelon fields in eastern China are covered in exploded fruit. Farmers used growth chemicals to make their crops bigger, but ended up destroying them instead.

The farmers used the growth accelerator forchlorfenuron. Even the melons that survived tended to have fibrous, misshapen fruit with mostly white instead of black seeds.

MSNBC reports:

“Chinese regulations don’t forbid use of the substance. It is also allowed in the United States for use on kiwi fruit and grapes … About 20 farmers and 115 acres of watermelon around Danyang were affected … Farmers resorted to chopping up the fruit  Continue reading