Pumpkin Seeds: 11 Evidence-Based Health Benefits

Pumpkin seeds, like all edible seeds, pack an immense nutritional and medicinal punch. After all, they contain future worlds within their compact structure. As Emerson said, “the creation of a thousand forests is within one acorn” Continue reading

Five Ways to Ensure You Are Drinking Safe, Clean Water Even in a Crisis

The aftermath of the Northeastern U.S. Frankenstorm or superstorm demonstrates what can happen in heavily populated areas stricken without power and lots of flooding.

A relatively mild hurricane, Sandy, converged with a cross country Pacific storm and a southward Arctic air blast. They all met simultaneously in this country’s most populated coastal area during a full moon high tide. Continue reading

Reverse Osteoporosis by Simply Drinking Lactoferrin, Find It in Your Fridge

Did You Know…that a whey protein found in milk can be taken in supplement form to reverse osteoporosis, treat iron deficiency, as well as restrain the growth of HIV? Continue reading

Improved Digestion Means Improved Mood, Immunity and More

Your body’s many systems all work together to create a peaceful flow, so when one system goes off balance it can trigger a domino effect, creating a cascade of health problems that follow. One system particularly responsible for optimal well-being is your digestive system — a strong, yet delicate ecosystem that relies on the presence of good bacteria and specialized immune cells to control the presence of bad bacteria or other harmful invaders. In fact, your digestive health directly impacts your immune health, and vice versa, since 70 to 80 percent of your immune system is actually located in your digestive system. Continue reading

Detoxify Your Body Naturally- Salt Water Flush

Did you know… that a salt water flush does a superior (and inexpensive) job at detoxifying your colon than a colonic irrigation procedure?

Perhaps you’ve heard the saying: “Death begins in the colon.” Indeed, as toxic debris from inadequate and infrequent elimination gathers in the colon, it produces poisons that can slowly, but surely, cause disease and, consequently, death.

Experts say that approximately 85% of Americans suffer from poor digestion and incomplete elimination. To understand the effects, picture a piece of meat rotting away when it’s unrefrigerated. Lactobacilli turns the meat sour … the biochemical compounds produced by the bacteria as they grow causes the meat to smell bad … putrefying bacteria decomposes the animal proteins … and so on and so forth. It’s not a pretty sight –or smell.

Now, picture that putrefying food happening inside your body,  Continue reading

Aggressive Drug Therapy Aids Superbug Evolution

New research raises troubling concerns about the use of aggressive drug therapies to treat a wide range of diseases such as MRSA, C. difficile, malaria, and even cancer.

“The universally accepted strategy of aggressive medication to kill all targeted disease pathogens has the problematic consequence of giving any drug-resistant disease pathogens that are present the greatest possible evolutionary advantage,” says Troy Day, one of the paper’s co-authors and Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Biology at Queen’s.

The researchers note that while the first aim of a drug treatment program should be to make and keep a patient healthy, the patient’s immune system also has to be allowed to work.

They suggest several strategies Continue reading

Flushing out Gallstone is Necessary for Optimal Health

Our livers, the chief detoxifiers for our bodies, are being overworked. Our stressful lifestyles, drugs we consume, and chemical food additives are just a few of the stressors. Free roaming toxins can burden our hearts, reduce available oxygen, and, consequently, become trapped and stored to produce bile clumps, also known as gallstones. The body forms gallstones for our protection by preventing the toxins from being absorbed through the intestinal wall and back into our bodies. Our bodies function well following this design – until they become clogged with too many gallstones. Because too many gallstones can have a negative effect on our bodies, flushing gallstones from the liver and gallbladder becomes essential to maintaining our health.

Why would we want to flush the stones out of our systems? Continue reading

80% of Fish Eaten in US is Imported of which 50% is Farmed. Beware of Drugs.

Does the fish on your plate need a drug test? According to an April 14, 2011 report issued by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, The Food and Drug Administration is not doing enough to ensure that the fish available to American consumers is uncontaminated by antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals. They found that the FDA lacks “procedures, criteria and standards” to see that the fish being sent to U.S. markets are safe. The European Union, on the other hand, has a much tougher inspection and regulation system for seafood.

The Problem with U.S. Fish Inspection

Of all the fish consumed in the United States, 80 percent are imported. Half of imported fish comes from fish farms. China is the largest producer, providing a quarter of the fish imported  Continue reading

Mosquitoes Deliver Malaria ‘Vaccine’ Through Bites

In a daring experiment in Europe, scientists used mosquitoes as flying needles to deliver a “vaccine” of live malaria parasites through their bites. The results were astounding: Everyone in the vaccine group acquired immunity to malaria; everyone in a non-vaccinated comparison group did not, and developed malaria when exposed to the parasites later.

The study was only a small proof-of-principle test, and its approach is not practical on a large scale. However, it shows that scientists may finally be on the right track to developing an effective vaccine against one of mankind’s top killers. A vaccine that uses modified live parasites just entered human testing.

“Malaria vaccines are moving from the laboratory into the real world,” Dr. Carlos Campbell wrote in an editorial accompanying the study in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine. He works for PATH, the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health, a Seattle-based global health foundation.

The new study “reminds us that the whole malaria parasite is the most potent immunizing” agent, even though it is harder to develop a vaccine this way and other leading candidates take a different approach, he wrote.

Malaria kills nearly a million people each year, mostly children under 5 and especially in Africa. Infected mosquitoes inject immature malaria parasites into the skin when they bite; these travel to the liver where they mature and multiply. From there, they enter the bloodstream and attack red blood cells — the phase that makes people sick.

People can develop immunity to malaria if exposed to it many times. The drug chloroquine can kill parasites in the final bloodstream phase, when they are most dangerous.

Scientists tried to take advantage of these two factors, by using chloroquine to protect people while gradually exposing them to malaria parasites and letting immunity develop.

They assigned 10 volunteers to a “vaccine” group and five others to a comparison group. All were given chloroquine for three months, and exposed once a month to about a dozen mosquitoes — malaria-infected ones in the vaccine group and non-infected mosquitoes in the comparison group.

That was to allow the “vaccine” effect to develop. Next came a test to see if it was working.

All 15 stopped taking chloroquine. Two months later, all were bitten by malaria-infected mosquitoes. None of the 10 in the vaccine group developed parasites in their bloodstreams; all five in the comparison group did.

The study was done in a lab at Radboud University in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, and was funded by two foundations and a French government grant.

 This is not a vaccine” as in a commercial product, but a way to show how whole parasites can be used like a vaccine to protect against disease, said one of the Dutch researchers, Dr. Robert Sauerwein.

“It’s more of an in-depth study of the immune factors that might be able to generate a very protective type of response,” said Dr. John Treanor, a vaccine specialist at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, N.Y., who had no role in the study.

The concept already is in commercial development. A company in Rockville, Md. — Sanaria Inc. — is testing a vaccine using whole parasites that have been irradiated to weaken them, hopefully keeping them in an immature stage in the liver to generate immunity but not cause illness.

Two other reports in the New England Journal show that resistance is growing to artemisinin, the main drug used against malaria in the many areas where chloroquine is no longer effective. Studies in Thailand and Cambodia found the malaria parasite is less susceptible to artemisinin, underscoring the urgent need to develop a vaccine.