Parents Shocked to Learn ‘BPA-Free’ Baby Bottles Are Loaded with other Estrogen Mimickers: Born Free, Weil Baby, CamelBak and More

Baby bottles from AVENT, Born Free, Green to Grow, Evenflo and Weil Baby all emit high or very high levels of hormone-altering chemicals, says new research published in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Health. (1) “Many PC-replacement-products made from acrylic, Continue reading

MSNBC Host Says Newborn Infants Don’t Count as ‘Alive’ Unless Parents Decide they Do; Infanticide Is the New Abortion

Today Natural News denounces Melissa Harris-Perry, the latest talking head “death worshipper” to publicly imply that she supports the murder of living, breathing newborn children. According to Harris-Perry, life begins when the parents feel like life begins. And together with some twisted new “ethics” arguments from the radical left, Continue reading

Natural Breakthrough May Put Brakes on Childhood Allergies

Studies have shown that there’s no more distressing sound to humans than a baby crying — and I believe it. As a parent, there’s nothing worse than watching our children suffer, particularly when they’re young and unable to communicate what’s ailing them.

But if an exciting new study out of Australia is correct, Continue reading

It Takes a Village to Keep Teens Substance Free

During high school the parents of teenagers’ friends can have as much effect on the teens’ substance use as their own parents, according to prevention researchers.

“Among friendship groups with ‘good parents’ there’s a synergistic effect — if your parents are consistent Continue reading

Getting a Grip on Childhood Obesity

American adults are overweight and obese, which is a huge problem for our healthcare system, tax dollars, productivity and quality of life. But the fact that our kids are increasingly obese means we may be dooming the next generation to an unhappy lifetime of chronic disease. We have to take action now to halt the juvenile obesity epidemic, or the consequences will be tragic.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), “Obesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States — triple the rate from just one generation ago.” That 17 percent equates to 12.5 million obese children, ages 2 to 19.

In its 2011 “Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report,” the CDC blames a good part of this problem on the serving and advertising of “sugar drinks and less healthy foods on school campuses.” Ads sell junk foods to kids, while parents feed their children what they ask for instead of providing balanced meals. Added to that, kids are eating supersized portions of foods containing too much sugar and fat.

If we consider the alarming numbers of inner-city children with weight problems, it’s obvious that kids don’t get enough exercise and don’t have access to safe places to play. Even for those interested in outdoor activity, finding a safe place or even getting to one is an issue. In its “State Indicator Report on Physical Activity,  Continue reading

Fever is not Your Child’s Enemy but His Friend

It can be scary when your child’s forehead feels abnormally warm to the touch. So it’s only natural for parents to stress over how to treat a fever in their child. But your impulse to bring that fever down immediately with ibuprofen or acetaminophen may not be the best move, according to a new American Academy of Pediatrics clinical report, published in the journal Pediatrics. The reason: Your child’s fever is a physiologic mechanism that has beneficial effects in fighting infection, so reducing the fever may actually hamper healing.

The details: Even when a child has a mild fever, many parents want to administer antipyretics such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen, according to the report. That’s natural; we all want to be reassured by that “normal” 98.6 reading on the thermometer. But according to the AAP researchers, there is no evidence that fever itself worsens the course of an illness, or causes any long-term neurologic complications. “Thus, the primary goal…should be to improve the child’s overall comfort rather than focus on the normalization of body temperature,” the report says. Continue reading

Patience Can Prevent Needless Exposure to Children from Cancer Linked Radiation

Are you a parent? Here’s a simple question to ask yourself: if your youngster receives a bump on the head, would you rather keep an eye on your child for 4 to 6 hours to make sure he or she suffered no serious trauma — or would you prefer that doctors zap your child’s brain with ionizing radiation from costly computed tomography (CT) scans just to make you feel better immediately?

Most moms and dads would probably prefer the simple “watchful waiting” approach if they thought there was little chance their offspring had serious head trauma. And it turns out, according to a huge study of more than 40,000 kids with blunt head trauma just published online in the journal Pediatrics, simple observation is the best approach and also the healthiest — because it doesn’t expose children to ionizing radiation.

So why do about half of all US children taken to hospital emergency departments (EDs) for a head injury receive a head CT scan? Remarkably, the scientists behind the new research claim it is “often to ease worried parents’ concerns”. Simply put, parents are blamed for the outrageously common practice of exposing children needlessly to radiation for a bump on the head. Continue reading

Desirable Behavior Should Be Instilled by Parents and not from Television or the Computer

Parents that allow their children to spend lots of time on the computer and in front of the television may be inadvertently contributing to an epidemic rise in “multiple-risk behaviors” (MRBs) among adolescents, suggests a new study published in the Journal of Preventative Medicine. High computer use, say researchers, can lead to a 50 percent increased risk of developing MRBs like drug use, drunkenness, and unprotected sex.

When children are exposed to violence, wild partying, and other negative things through video games, television shows, and various internet content, they tend to adopt those behaviors themselves. Rather than develop life habits through natural exposure to family and friends, media-addicted youth  Continue reading

States Need Better Policies Governing the Storage of Surplus Blood Samples for Newborns

State laws and policies governing the storage and use of surplus blood samples taken from newborns as part of the routine health screening process range from explicit to non-existent, leaving many parents ill-informed about how their babies’ left over blood might be used, according to a team led by a member of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Utah. A report on their analysis of the subject is published March 28 in the journal Pediatrics.

The study is believed to be one of the first to provide in-depth analysis of the nation’s fragmented newborn screening blood use policies. The authors say that their findings underscore the need for a comprehensive and transparent approach. At a minimum, all states should require that parents be fully informed about how babies’ blood samples left over after the screening procedure will be stored and how they might be used, according to Michelle H. Lewis, M.D., J.D.,  Continue reading

The Best Way to Treat a Child’s Fever

If your child’s temperature was 100.3 degrees, would you consider that a fever? Would you wake him or her to administer an anti-fever medication? If you answered yes to both questions, you have a lot of company. You are also wrong.

A study published in the March issue of the Journal Pediatrics found that roughly half of all parents erroneously believe a body temperature of less than 100.4 degrees is a fever and about 85 percent say they would wake a sleeping child to give medication to lower his temperature. Another one-quarter said they would give OTC anti-fever medicines to kids with temperatures below 100 degrees.

Not only does the study suggest that Dr. Mom and Dr. Dad overreact when they think  Continue reading

Experts Say Men More Vulnerable to Mental Illness

NEW DELHI – Don’t reprimand your son for sobbing over a problem he is facing or tick him off for “behaving like a sissy”. It would only make him bottle up his emotions and lead to serious implications on his overall well being. Experts say men are more vulnerable to mental illness and depression than you would imagine.

Praveen Thapar, chairperson of the Sanjivni Centre for Mental Health, said while it’s true that women are more prone to depression, it’s equally true that women are better at sharing their emotions and problems than men – as a result most men keep their problems to themselves which has serious implications later.

In our society we co-relate the word man with power. From the time he is a child, a boy is told not to cry ‘like a sissy’ and be strong. Thus from an early stage he grows up with this learning that he should hide his emotions behind a serene face, Thapar told IANS ahead of World Mental Health Day Saturday.

This however can have serious implications later in life. This habit of bottling up one’s feelings and frustrations may lead to a breakdown later, she said.

Akhila Vasudev, a counselor, agreed.

“While women are more open about their problems and emotions, with men, even when they are with friends, the discussion rarely goes beyond the football match or finances. Often it’s because they have been molded that way.”

”A number of male patients that I have therefore admit that they feel much better after simply talking about their problems. It helps that I am a stranger, they say. Opening up in front of the family is harder,” said Vasudev.

Quoting an example, Thapar said at a post-retirement conference that she attended recently, all that was being discussed about was how to manage your finances.

Post-retirement phase is a different experiences altogether. You have more time on your hand, your expectations may increase, you may feel worthless and useless sitting around – but all that the men talked about was finances, she said.

According to the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC), mental illness will be the biggest health risk in India by 2010.

The National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro-Sciences (NIMHANS) further says that while 20 million Indians suffer from major mental ailments, 50 million suffer from milder forms.

Depression, anxiety, panic attacks and hysteria are all mild forms of mental illnesses which people often ignore, experts say.

According to R.C. Jiloha, head of the department of psychiatry at the Maulana Azad Medical College, among the most common form of mental disorders that men suffer from are anxiety disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder.

Because of an increasing awareness on the issue, I have a lot of men coming to me for counseling. But the best way to tackle this is for the corrective measures to begin in the families itself,” Thapar said.

“Parents should interact more with their children and encourage them to be themselves. They should not have a different attitude towards their sons and daughters, she advised.