Physicians Reluctant To Use Data From Wearable Health Trackers

Most physicians are hesitant to use data from patients’ wearable health data trackers, according to experts in the digital health, health care and medical device industries, VentureBeat reports. Continue reading

Are Researchers Hiding the Truth on Breast Cancer Treatment?

Breast cancer: Those words have the ability to send a chill up your spine unlike any other two words in the English language.

It’s rare to meet a person whose life hasn’t been touched in some way by this terrible disease. According to the American Cancer Society, one out of every eight American women Continue reading

Alternative Media Blows the Lid on Big Pharma’s Massive Bribery Network

Two of the most influential alternative media organizations on the ‘net — InfoWars.com and NaturalNews.com — have blown the lid wide open on Big Pharma’s massive bribery network. Through exclusive interviews with pharma insiders, InfoWars and NaturalNews have done what the mainstream media refuses to do: grant a platform to credible whistleblowers who are exposing the systematic, criminal Big Pharma bribing of doctors who willingly accept kickbacks to write prescriptions for high-profit pharmaceuticals. Continue reading

Breakthrough in the World of Vision Health

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of age-related blindness. What used to be health secrets aren’t so secretive any more: natural medicine offers valuable protection against AMD. Now, for the time ever, researchers report that an oral nutraceutical may Continue reading

Emergency Medicine Physicians Develop Device to Stop Lethal Bleeding in Soldiers

Two emergency medicine physicians with wartime experience have developed a weapon against one rapidly lethal war injury. Continue reading

Chronic Acid Reflux Can Lead to Cancer

If you want a real solution to acid reflux indigestion, don’t follow the conventional wisdom of conventional physicians. While drug companies and mainstream doctors maintain that acid reflux, acid indigestion and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) result from too much stomach acid, they’ve got the situation backwards: Reflux results from too little stomach acid, not too much.

Still, Big Pharma and its accomplices continue to sell us counter-productive prescription and over-the-counter antacids and prescription proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). In the long run, these alleged remedies worsen the situation.

Too Little Too Late

Acid reflux results from having too little hydrochloric acid (HCl), the “good” stomach acid. When the stomach does not produce enough HCl, foods cannot be digested properly. This causes indigestion, as food sits in the stomach far too long. The longer that food lingers, the more stomach acid is necessary to break it down. This stagnant situation leads to prolonged acid reflux.

Americans are in the habit of reaching for quick-relief tablets when experiencing pain and illness. In the case of acid indigestion, Continue reading

Balance Problems May be Early Sign of Alzheimer’s

Falls and balance problems may be early indicators of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report July 17, 2011, at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on Alzheimer ’s disease in Paris.

Scientists found that study participants with brain changes suggestive of early Alzheimer’s disease were more likely to fall than those whose brains did not show the same changes. Until now, falls had only been associated with Alzheimer’s in the late stages of dementia.

“If you meet these people on the street,  Continue reading

Study Shows Obese Men more Receptive to Receiving Weight Loss Counseling

When compared to their female counterparts, men who are obese are more likely to engage in open dialogue and receive counseling on how to lose weight, especially when they have male physicians, according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University.

Obese female patients and women physicians were least likely to have discussions regarding weight, and the study authors theorized that it is due to notions that women are sensitive and unsatisfied with their bodies.

“Perhaps societal norms linking physical fitness to masculinity leads male physicians to view obese men as more receptive to weight-related counseling and contributes to open  Continue reading

Researchers Solicit Cheap eHealth Alternative

Free software is secure, creators say

Researchers at Hamilton’s McMaster University say they have devised an electronic medical records system that can be implemented by physicians across Ontario for two per cent of the money the provincial government has spent on eHealth Ontario.

The web-based program, dubbed OSCAR, organizes medical records and can be set up on any computer system with a browser. It was first created in 2001, and has attracted more users each year.

Around 600 doctors across the country — including 450 family physicians in Ontario — currently use the software.

The software is open-source, which means users are allowed access to its basic code. Users are free to add to or modify the software without fear of legal repercussions, as long they abide by the conditions of the General Public Licence, which stipulates that the program must remain open and sharable.

Because it’s open-source, OSCAR is free. The costs to set it up come in the form of servers, hardware and support staff.

“In Ontario, there are approximately 8,000 family physicians that are not using electronic medical record systems. All these physicians could have OSCAR implemented within the next 24 months, and the cost would be less than $20 million,” Dr. David Price, chair of family medicine at McMaster’s medical school, said in a release.

While the software would be able to cover all the family physicians in Ontario, it is not as comprehensive in scope as eHealth, which is charged with linking all healthcare facilities, including hospitals and clinics, not just family doctors.

$1B spent already

Yet it can still help in digitizing Ontario’s medical records, said Dr. David Chan, who developed the software.

He said Ontario’s approach to building a health-record system is wrong. The province spent some $1 billion commissioning eHealth Ontario to produce an electronic medical database.

But in a report released Wednesday, Ontario Auditor General Jim McCarter said the province had wasted that investment and eHealth had little to show for its work.

We really don’t need to spend that kind of money. I think the government’s paranoia about building … a secure network is hugely expensive,” Chan said Friday.

People often get concerned about the security risks of open-source software, but Chan said it has passed stringent provincial security tests. It is no more vulnerable to hackers than more expensive proprietary software, he said.