How Exercise Helps Strengthen Your Bones and Avoid Osteoporosis, Safely and Naturally

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Certain nutrients, including omega-3 fat, calcium, vitamin D, K2, and magnesium, are critical for strong bones. Your sodium to potassium ratio also plays an important role in maintaining your bone mass Continue reading

Green Tea and Tai Chai Team Up to Protect Bones

Green tea is one of the latest superfoods making its way into bottled waters and energy drinks.  You’ll even find it in energy bars, mints, chewing gum and ice cream. It has many claimed health benefits.  Texas researchers add to the list with evidence that green tea aids in the prevention of osteoporosisContinue reading

Got Prunes? Drop the Milk for This Exceptional Bone Builder

Ask anyone to name the one food that is best for building strong bones and you will, of course, hear overwhelmingly that it is milk. But not so fast – when it comes to improving bone health in postmenopausal women — and people of all ages for that matter — one researcher says prunes are a superstar for preventing fractures and osteoporosis. Continue reading

Estrogen Therapy Ups Kidney Stones Risk in Postmenopausal Women

WASHINGTON – A new report has suggested that the use of estrogen therapy is associated with an increased risk of developing kidney stones in postmenopausal women.

Using data from the national Women’s Health Initiative study, Naim M. Maalouf, of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, examined data from two trials: 10,739 postmenopausal women with hysterectomy who received either an estrogen-only treatment or matching placebo and 16,608 postmenopausal women without hysterectomy who received either an estrogen plus progestin treatment or matching placebo. Data were collected for an average of 7.1 years in the estrogen-only trial and 5.6 years for the estrogen plus progestin trial.

A total of 335 cases of kidney stones were reported in the active treatment groups, while 284 cases occurred in the placebo groups. The beginning demographic characteristics and risk factors for kidney stones were similar in the two groups, and the authors found that estrogen therapy was associated with a significant increase in risk of kidney stones. The corresponding annualized incidence rate per 10,000 women per year was 39 in the treatment group and 34 in the placebo group.

Development of kidney stones was five times more common in women with a history of kidney stones at the beginning of the study, but was not significantly altered by estrogen therapy. In this trial, estrogen therapy increased the risk of development of kidney stones irrespective of age, ethnicity, body mass index, prior hormone therapy use or use of coffee or thiazide diuretics.

The authors conclude that their results “indicate that estrogen therapy increases the risk of nephrolithiasis in healthy postmenopausal women. The mechanisms underlying this higher propensity remain to be determined. In view of the sizable prevalence of nephrolithiasis in this segment of the population, these findings need to be considered in the decision-making process regarding postmenopausal estrogen use.”

The report has been published in the issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.