Parsley Is a Powerful Detoxifier

Did You Know…

… that a popular food garnish is actually a powerful kidney and liver detoxifier?

No more shoving parsley to the side of your plate as an un-edible garnish.  This little green herb is actually far more than decorative.  It’s loaded with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, Continue reading

Warning: Why You Should Avoid Using Your Laptop as Recommended

Story at-a-glance

  • Use caution with any laptop use, especially if you’re a pregnant woman, and if you choose to use it on your lap, only do so with a lap pad or cushion that is about one foot thick
  • You may be able to lessen EMF exposure during laptop use by using an external keyboard (as even typing on your laptop may expose you to high EMFs) and only using it while it’s battery-powered, not while plugged in, Continue reading

Ginger Root Eases Nausea and Vomiting

Ginger root is a favorite among herbalists, used in a variety of situations. The spicy root, or rhizome, of the ginger plant can either be eaten raw, powdered, made into tea, juiced, tinctured, or even candied. One of the most common uses for ginger root is for nausea and vomiting. Placebo-controlled, double-blind studies have proven that ginger root effectively reduces nausea and vomiting caused by motion sickness, surgery, and morning sickness during pregnancy. Because organic ginger root is completely safe to use during pregnancy, the herb is especially treasured by pregnant women around the world. Continue reading

Do You Really Need a Flu Shot?

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The government and pharmaceutical companies relentlessly promote flu shots every year, insisting that supposedly “high risk” groups like pregnant women, children less than 5 years of age (especially under the age of 2) and everyone over age 50 should be vaccinated. But there are serious questions about the advisability of these shots. In some cases, a flu shot may interfere with immunity rather than boost it. Continue reading

NIH Study Links High Levels of Cadmium, Lead in Blood to Pregnancy Delay

Higher blood levels of cadmium in females, and higher blood levels of lead in males, delayed pregnancy in couples trying to become pregnant, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other academic research institutions. Continue reading

Hair Can Indicate Your Risk of a Heart Attack

Many of us have felt that stress was causing us to lose our hair, but a recent study shows that the amount of stress one has experienced can actually be measured in our hair and can be correlated with heart attack risk.

Lead researcher Gideon Koran, professor of pediatric medicine and toxicology at University of Western Ontario, had been studying hair samples of children whose mothers had used cocaine and heroin while pregnant. Fellow researchers measured cortisone levels in the hair samples of body builders who used steroids. Koran began to think that if cortisone from drug use could be measured in hair, then couldn’t cortisone from the results of stress Continue reading

Medical myths: Bizarre, but true…

Fat people are jollier

Ever since Falstaff, fatness has been associated with jollity. According to psychologists at Lakehead University in Canada, the “jolly fat” hypothesis might actually be true, at least among women. Not only have they found a link, they suggest a mechanism, too: estrogen.

They put forward the idea that body fat protects women again negative moods. In other words, the fatter a woman is, the less depressed she gets.

In the two-part research, the team looked at Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure that takes into account Continue reading

The Benefits and Side Effects of Hibiscus Tea

People drink tea for a number of reasons, ranging from an affinity for the taste to an extra caffeine boost to a variety of health benefits. Tea is a popular drink across the world, and whether you’re drinking chai in India or Earl Gray in Britain, each tea has a unique flavor and essence. Jamaica flower tea is a hibiscus tea known for its popularity in Mexico.

Jamaica Flower Tea

Jamaica flower tea is an iced tea made from a flower called Jamaica (hibiscus sabdariffa). In Mexico, hibiscus blossoms are called Jamaica and Jamaica flower tea is called “Agua de Jamaica.” Made from a strong brew of hibiscus flower tea, Jamaica flower tea is a tart, flavorful red tea, often sweetened heavily with sugar.

Diuretic, Laxative or Digestive Supplement Continue reading

Erectile Dysfunction and Diabetes type 1 Linked to Soy and Soy Products

Over the past few years, soy has been hailed as a miracle health food. Unfortunately, the complete opposite is true. Soy has been linked to a myriad of health conditions such as infantile leukemia, various forms of cancer, type-1 diabetes, malnutrition, thyroid dysfunction and even erectile dysfunction.

Research has shown that babies who have been fed soy-based formulas were at higher risk for developing type-1 diabetes and thyroid disease later in life. Soy-based formulas also contain up to 1000 times more aluminum than non soy-based formulas.

Soy contains a large amount of anti-nutrients (otherwise known as toxins). One of these is what is referred to as enzyme inhibitors. Enzyme inhibitors block the action of the enzymes which are required to digest proteins. Even cooking the soy at high temperatures does not break down these inhibitors. As a result, consuming soy and soy products can lead to conditions such as reduced protein digestion, excessive bloating, a deficiency of essential amino acids, abnormal thyroid functions, a higher risk of breast cancer in women who have had ovaries removed and abnormal blood  Continue reading

If You Are Pregnant You Must Take Vitamin D

(London) Pregnant women in the UK should be told to routinely take vitamin D supplements, researchers say.

The team at University College London Institute of Child Health says official bodies currently offer conflicting advice.

Writing in the British Journal of Nutrition, they say there is a “strong case” for a daily dose of vitamin D in pregnancy.
But one leading expert said more evidence was needed.

The Department of Health advises pregnant women to ensure they receive a certain level of vitamin D – 10 micrograms per day. The researchers say this in effect endorses use of supplements, because diet and the sun provide too little.

But the National Institute of health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) said in its guidance that it did not support supplements.

It has instead said that women should simply “be informed” about the importance of having adequate vitamin D levels during their pregnancy and while breastfeeding – adding that some women may choose to do this via supplements.

Additionally, pregnant women on low incomes are entitled to a range of nutrients – including vitamin D – as part of the Healthy Start Scheme.
‘Unacceptably high’

The paper said the UK was the only one of 31 countries examined which did not recommend that women of reproductive age took a vitamin D supplement, and that it also fails to endorse a daily supplement for expectant mothers.

Dr Elina Hypponen, co-author of the paper, said: “The incidence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women in Britain is unacceptably high, especially during winter and spring.
“This is compounded by a lack of exposure to sunlight and the limitations of an average diet to meet the optimal need.
“In the most severe cases, maternal vitamin D deficiency can be life threatening to a newborn.
“We believe that the routine provision of a daily supplement throughout pregnancy would significantly decrease the number of mothers who are clearly vitamin D deficient, reducing related serious risks to their babies.”

Dr Hypponen said past evidence showed a proactive approach to supplements coincided with a much lower incidence of deficiency linked diseases such as infantile hypocalcaemia [also known as William’s syndrome, which affects development], and rickets [which weakens bones].

One in four

The authors say women from some ethnic minorities are recognized to be at greater risk because their darker skin means they do not absorb as much sunlight.
But they add that the problem is also common among white women, even when they live in southern England.

Women are more likely to be vitamin D deficient than men, and a previous study found one in four pregnant mothers has been found to be vitamin D deficient during winter and spring
The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends only women at risk of vitamin D deficiency should take a supplement.

Patrick O’Brien, a spokesman for the college, said: “There is gradually accumulating evidence that universal vitamin D supplementation in the UK might be beneficial for the whole population.
“But more research is needed on the balance of risks and benefits in women at low risk of vitamin D deficiency, and on the correct dosage to use.”