Thoughts Can Produce Health Enhancing Biochemicals

Did You Know……that positive thoughts can produce health-enhancing biochemicals superior to any that a pharmaceutical company could ever manufacture–without any adverse side effects? Continue reading

School Turns Abandoned Athletic Field into Organic Garden that Grows Thousands of Pounds of Produce to Serve in Cafeteria

A Denver, Co., public school has set the bar high for reconnecting the next generation of children with the food they eat. ABC 7 News in Denver reports that Denver Green School (DGS), an urban “innovation” school, has brought new life to an unused, one-acre athletic field by turning it into an organic garden — and the garden has been such a success in just eight months that the school is able to serve fresh produce from it to students in the cafeteria. Continue reading

How to Rid yourself of Gnats with Easy Homemade Trap

With warm weather comes a bounty of fresh fruit and vegetables. Sometimes, the produce bounty can also bring an unwanted bounty of annoying gnats swarming around the produce and other food items. Once gnats arrive, they may reproduce seemingly forever unless we take the right steps to get rid of them.

Gnats are most often found around produce and other food items. That is why they are often found on those food items as well as around trash cans, in sink drains and in garbage disposals. Gnats also like moist places such as over-watered plants and refrigerator drain trays.

How to Prevent Household Gnats

1. Don`t leave uncovered produce or food items out and don`t leave dirty dishes in the sink. Continue reading

Light, Photosynthesis Harmful to Fresh Produce

TEL-AVIV –  A study conducted by Israeli researchers suggests that exposure to light, and possibly photosynthesis, may help disease-causing bacteria to invade fresh produce, making them impervious to washing.

According to background information in a report published in journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology, past studies have already shown that salmonella enterica attaches to the surface of fresh produce, and finds its way below the surface of the skin through pores called stomata, where it can hide from and resist washing and food sanitizers.

In the new study, researchers from the Agricultural Research Organization at the Volcani Center in Israel and Tel-Aviv University examined the role that light and photosynthesis might play on the ability of salmonella bacteria to infiltrate lettuce leaves via stomata.

They exposed sterile iceberg lettuce leaves to bacteria either in the light, in the dark, or in the dark after 30 minutes of exposure to light.

Incubation in the light or pre-exposure to light resulted in aggregation of bacteria around open stomata and invasion into the inner leaf tissue.

Incubation in the dark, on the other hand, resulted in a scattered attachment pattern and very little internalization.

According to the researchers, the increased propensity for internalization in the light may be due to several factors.

First, they say, in the absence of light plants enter a period of dormancy, where stomata are closed and no photosynthesis takes place. In the light, the stomata are open.

Additional findings also suggest that the bacteria are attracted to the open stomata by the nutrients produced during photosynthesis, which are not present in the dark.

“The elucidation of the mechanism by which Salmonella invades intact leaves has important implications for both pre- and postharvest handling of lettuce and probably other leafy vegetables. The capacity to inhibit internalization should limit bacterial colonization to the phylloplane and consequently might enhance the effectiveness of surface sanitizers,” say the researchers.