Using Hormones? What You Need to Know

More and more people are using bio-identical hormone therapy. Though this therapy conveys a wide range of benefits, it can also pose the risk of undesirable side effects. But you can make this therapy safer and more effective with an individualized approach: Understand how your body metabolizes hormones and boost their benefits with the right diet, lifestyle and supplements. Continue reading

Insomnia can be treated with Natural Progesterone for Women

A source of great frustration for many people, insomnia is a fairly common occurrence that prevents individuals from sleeping. It can manifest in a variety of ways, including the inability to initially fall asleep and repeatedly waking up in the middle of the night. When not treated, insomnia can affect the health and productivity of an individual, and if left alone for too long, it can cause serious health problems. Many women that are undergoing premenopausal or menopause complain of insomnia, which is one of many items on a list of symptoms associated with these phases that cause the body to change in major ways (understandably throwing off several of their usually regular systems). Because sleeping aids can become addictive and cause other side effects, many women who suffer from insomnia seek out natural remedies, and some studies have shown that the intake of the hormone progesterone can relieve the sleepless nights.

A steroid hormone, Progesterone is produced in the ovaries, adrenal glands, and placenta of human beings. An important part of the female reproductive system, this hormone plays a major role in the conception, development, and birth of a child. Because the levels of progesterone are so closely tied to the cycle of a woman’s reproductive organs, premenopausal and menopause naturally leave its levels highly unbalanced, which can cause many side effects through its lack of interaction with other parts of the body. Continue reading

The Truth and Fiction Concerning DHEA

There are thousands of books and medical journals written on the subject of DHEA, so we will attempt to explain the facts in an easy to understand way, so you can better understand what is truth and what is fiction to help you make better choices about your health care.

Dihydroepiandrosterone “DHEA”

DHEA is a naturally occurring steroid hormone produced in the adrenal glands by both men and women, and it’s the most abundant steroid hormone in the bloodstream.

We are all born with natural DHEA, and our bodies continue to produce it on a daily basis, depending upon our physical circumstances. DHEA plays a key role in our physiological functions, and without it we cannot survive.

There is much confusion and twisting of the facts regarding true DHEA naturally produced by our own body, and the synthetic drug which has been given a trade name of DHEA. We will call true DHEA “DHEA”, and the synthetic drug “synthetic DHEA”. We will touch base on that shortly, but in the meantime we will discuss some of the aspects of true DHEA, naturally produced by your own body.

DHEA is the Mother Hormone Continue reading

5 Ways Menopause Sabotages Sleep

Want to know one of the most telling signs that you’re nearing or in the midst of menopause? The concept of eight hours of uninterrupted sleep sounds as precious — and as out of reach — as fitting into the jeans you wore in high school. According to a comprehensive report on menopause and sleep by the National Sleep Foundation, 61 percent of women between 45 and 60 say they suffer from sleeplessness and other sleep problems. Adding insult to injury, most women don’t consider this problem serious enough to seek treatment. In fact, in a separate survey of women suffering from menopause-related sleep problems, 62 percent said they hadn’t talked to a healthcare professional about their symptoms.

Yet recent research shows that poor sleep and lack of sleep raise your risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, weight gain, and immune system dysfunction. It’s time to get some help! Continue reading

Why Health Care Costs Are Rising – Here Is One Reason

The price of preventing preterm labor is about to go through the roof.

A drug for high-risk pregnant women has cost about $10 to $20 per injection. Next week, the price shoots up to $1,500 a dose, meaning the total cost during a pregnancy could be as much as $30,000.

That’s because the drug, a form of progesterone given as a weekly shot, has been made cheaply for years, mixed in special pharmacies that custom-compound treatments that are not federally approved. Continue reading

Soy May Be Harmful to Sexual Behavior

America has a love affair with soy especially women who believe it fights osteoporosis and that soy formula is a good choice for infants. Although promoted as a health food, soy has been linked with numerous diseases including infertility and cancer.

Soybean farming is a multibillion-dollar industry. In fact, many of the worlds rain forests were cleared to provide more land to grow them. And as with so many health issues, once enormous profits are involved, it becomes difficult to get to the truth

I have two concerns about soy products. One is the direct effect of all soy products on health. The second is that more than 80 percent of all soybeans used for manufacturing foods are GMO (genetically modified). Genetic modifications cause the plant to produce abnormal proteins as well as to overproduce toxins normally produced by the plant. (For a detailed discussion on food safety, read my report “How to Avoid Poisonous Foods.”

But it’s not just modified soy that poses problems. Even natural soybeans have real dangers for health. One study found that infant monkeys fed soy extract soon after birth exhibited increased aggressiveness later in life and were socially withdrawn. Bad dietary choices can have profound effects on behavior, even producing criminal and sociopathic behavior. Soy foods are major players in this process.

Because soy contains estrogenic compounds, there is worry that it may disrupt the normal development of the brain, especially the brain’s sexual development. One study found that soy extracts could alter the development of the male hypothalamus, causing males to act more like females. It is the hypothalamus that determines our sexual behavioral development, especially a nucleus called the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA). (

When newborn male animals were fed soy formula (similar to human soy infant formula), this critical nucleus was reduced in size. In addition, males had greater difficulty maneuvering a maze when fed soy formula as an infant. In humans, this would mean boys would have greater difficulty learning.

Some studies have found soy formula had no effect on testosterone levels, but others found they were decreased. Most found that the prostate gland was significantly smaller in the soy-exposed males. Of considerable importance is the worry that feeding soy infant formulas to babies may cause them to act more feminine.

The soy-fed males also were found to have lower levels of brain 5-alpha-reductase in the hypothalamus and amygdala. These areas of the brain play a major role in sexual behavior. Low levels of this enzyme reduce levels of deoxytestosterone in the brain, the more powerful form of testosterone. A careful balance between estrogen and testosterone in the hypothalamus during early development is critical to sexual behavioral development.

The females fed soy had their own problems. The study found that when soy was fed to female newborns there was a significant fall in the release of oxytocin (dubbed the love hormone) from their brains. At least in the mice, this caused a decrease in sexual receptivity  that is, they were less interested in sex. Oxytocin is also critical for normal social development. Among its many additional functions is protecting the brain from inflammation.

The females fed soy as infants also had much lower brain 17-estradiol (estrogen), which was found to have adverse effects on normal female behavior.

In essence, these studies clearly indicate that even small changes in estrogen and testosterone can have undesirable effects on the sexual behavior of both male and female animals. They also demonstrate that compounds such as soy extracts can have negative effects on these delicate hypothalamic nuclei even in adulthood.

Courtesy of Dr. Blaylock

Aura’ Migraines a Stroke Risk

Young women who have migraines with auras are twice as likely to have a stroke, researchers have confirmed.

Auras are sensory or visual disturbances that occur before or during a migraine headache.

Based on available evidence, the risk is greater if the woman is under 45, smokes and is on the contraceptive pill, say international experts.

But a migraine charity said most sufferers did not have auras and the absolute risk of a stroke was small.

Migraines affect between 10-20% of people and are four times as common in women compared to men.

Although the relative increased risk of stroke associated with migraine with aura is seemingly high, the actual risk is extremely low.

The researchers, writing in the British Medical Journal online, say they looked at nine of the most recent studies on the links between migraine and cardiovascular problems.

A previous large study in 2004 did find migraine sufferers had twice the risk of a stroke but the newer studies show that the risk is confined to people who suffer migraines with auras.

The investigators from the US, France and Germany did not find any link between migraines and heart attacks or death due to cardiovascular disease but there was a 30% increase in the risk of angina (heart pain).

Markus Schurks, of the Harvard Medical School and who led the research, said: “Clinicians may not agree but population studies show that up to a third of sufferers experience auras with their headaches.

“And when you consider that as many as 40% of young women suffer from migraines you can see that it really makes an impact on the health of the population.”

Sex hormones

The authors recommend that young women who have migraine with aura should be strongly advised to stop smoking and methods of birth control other than oestrogen containing contraceptives should be considered.

They say recent animal studies have shown that high levels of oestrogen can produce auras in animals, so it could be the sex hormones affecting the vascular system, but more research is needed.

The British Heart Foundation recommended the women concerned reduce their risks as much possible – by switching to non-oestrogen based contraceptives, quitting smoking or contact their GP for further guidance.

Lee Tomkins, director of the charity Migraine Action, said: “I think this research will help women to understand that for the majority there is no additional risk, and for women with aura the best policy to help themselves is to have a migraine management plan in place that helps reduce the frequency of attacks, and try to minimise the aura part of the attack.”

Susan Haydon of The Migraine Trust stressed: “Although the relative increased risk of stroke associated with migraine with aura is seemingly high, the actual risk is extremely low.”

Dr Tony Rudd of The Stroke Association said: “Living a healthy lifestyle, taking regular exercise and having your blood pressure checked regularly are simple ways to reduce your risk of having a stroke.”