Kids Eat more Vegetables after Nutrition Lessons, Stanford Study Finds

Stanford scholars created food-themed storybooks that taught preschoolers about nutrients, the importance of eating different foods and how food fuels the body.

Children are naturally curious, Stanford researchers say. They sought to harness that curiosity by creating a framework to help children understand why they need to eat a variety of healthy foods.

Stanford researchers have come up with a new way to get picky preschoolers to eat more vegetables. Continue reading

New York Government Confiscates ‘Private’ Records of Psychiatrists in Chilling Orwellian Mental Health Sweep

And so it Begins

The march to tyranny has picked up fierce momentum in the state of New York, where the criminal Cuomo administration is now issuing subpoenas that demand psychiatrists turn over ALL their records to the state, reports AmmoLand.com.

This is just the first step Continue reading

Want to Be More Creative? Get Back to Nature

Feel as if your creativity is gone? Lack new ideas for your work — or your life? Don’t chalk it up to getting older or not being a “creative” or artistic type. Instead, what you may need is to simply get back to nature.

According to a study by psychologists from the University of Utah and University of Kansas, backpackers scored 50 percent better on a creativity test Continue reading

Learning Faster with Neurodegenerative Disease

Huntington’s gene mutation carriers: Severity of the genetic mutation related to learning efficiency

People who bear the genetic mutation for Huntington’s disease learn faster than healthy people. The more pronounced the mutation was, the more quickly they learned. This is reported by researchers from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum and from Dortmund in the journal Current Biology. Continue reading

Training Character Strengths Makes you Happy

Anyone who trains character strengths increases their sense of well being, a large-scale study conducted by a team of psychologists from the University of Zurich has concluded. It proved for the first time that this kind of training works. The largest impact was evident in training the strengths “curiosity”, “gratitude”, “optimism”, “humor” and “enthusiasm”. Continue reading

Despite Less Play, Children’s Use of Imagination Increases over Two Decades

Children today may be busier than ever, but Case Western Reserve University psychologists have found that their imagination hasn’t suffered – in fact, it appears to have increased.

Psychologists Jessica Dillon and Sandra Russ expected the opposite outcome when they analyzed 14 play studies that Russ conducted between 1985 and 2008. Continue reading

2-Year-old Children Understand Complex Grammar

Psychologists at the University of Liverpool have found that children as young as two years old have an understanding of complex grammar even before they have learned to speak in full sentences.

Researchers at the University’s Child Language Study Centre showed children, aged two, sentences containing made-up verbs, such as ‘the rabbit is glorping the duck’, and asked them to match the sentence with a cartoon picture. They found that even the youngest two-year-old could identify the correct image with the correct sentence, more often than would be expected by chance.

The study suggests that infants know more about language structure than they can actually articulate, and at a much earlier age than previously thought. The work also shows that children may use the structure of sentences to understand new words, which may help explain the speed at which infants acquire speech.

Dr Caroline Rowland, from the University’s Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, said: “When acquiring a language, Continue reading

Hormones are not Responsible for Female or Male Brain

Prof. Rebecca Jordan-Young, who teaches women’s, gender and sexuality studies at Columbia University’s Barnard College for Women in Manhattan, once asked students of both sexes to watch the video of a basketball game and count how many times the ball changed hands. At the end of the film, she queried: “And who noticed the gorilla on the court?” No one had paid attention to the hairy interloper because they were so engrossed in looking for what they were expecting to see.

“Our expectations are very powerful,” says Jordan-Young in an interview with The Jerusalem Post on her first-ever visit to Israel. Jordan-Young’s lecture on her latest findings was held at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s  Continue reading