Chris Williamson | Dating, Sex, Porn | Ep. 171

Welcome to the Pretty Intense Podcast. Today on the show was Chris Williamson. Chris is the host of Modern Wisdom Podcast. Chris has spent years collecting so much information from so many amazing people, I really was intrigued to talk to him about what he has learned. We talked about psychology, social norms, men and women, changes in society. I tapped into his fascination with evolutionary psychology. We really took a dive into dynamics with men and women, what it’s like to be a man, the dating hierarchy and how that is shifting. Stuff that is really changing our lives. This was a great conversation, where we covered a lot of topics, and came up with some solutions. Enjoy this deep dive with Chris Williamson.

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Dr. Charles Morgan on Psycho-Neurobiology and War: CRISPR, technique used to make the Covid Vaccines

Dr. Charles Morgan talks about the possibilities of CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats). CRISPR is the technique that is used to make the Covid-19 Vaccines. Continue reading

How to Awaken the Chakras: Introduction to Kundalini Energy (Episode 1)

An in-depth guide to understand the process of awakening the Chakras and Kundalini. This series consists of 9 episodes providing deep insights into the nature of each chakra and practices to activate them consciously. Areas covered are science, psychology, energy work, Astral projection, telepathy, Christianity, Ancient Egypt, esoteric symbolism and more. Discover the power of the cosmos that’s expressed as 7 manifestations of intelligence within you. Continue reading

The Mysteriously Long Lives of Male Holocaust Survivors

Last week, a study appeared in PLoS ONE, the peer-reviewed journal published by the Public Library of Science, that drew attention in Israel but made barely a ripple here: That men who’d survived the Holocaust lived longer — significantly longer — than their peers who’d never been under Nazi oppression. Continue reading

Pull Up Self-Sabotage by the Roots

What is self-sabotage?

Self-sabotage is a term we throw around a lot . We know what it is in a general sense or when we see someone doing it. But what is it really?

When we talk about self-sabotage, we are talking about getting in our own way. It’s not something someone else is doing. We are doing things ourselves that cause the problems that bother us so much. It might be as simple as eating more than one cookie when we are on a diet to choosing the absolutely wrong partner over and over. Continue reading

Why 8 Hours of Sleep a Night Just Isn’t Natural

Long after the lights go out every night, millions of Americans are lying in bed awake. Tossing and turning, their minds racing over the day’s accomplishments or tomorrow’s tasks, keeping them up well into the night. For others, it’s just blackness and frustration. As the tiredness mounts, the sleep still won’t come.

According to a 2011 poll, Continue reading

Pessimism about the Future May Lead to Longer, Healthier Life, Research Finds

Optimistic older adults face greater risk of disabilities and death, study report

Older people who have low expectations for a satisfying future may be more likely to live longer, healthier lives than those who see brighter days ahead, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

“Our findings revealed that being overly optimistic in predicting a better future was associated with a greater risk of disability and death within the following decade,” said lead author Frieder R. Lang, Continue reading

Multiple Media Use Tied to Depression, Anxiety

Using multiple forms of media at the same time – such as playing a computer game while watching TV – is linked to symptoms of anxiety and depression, scientists have found for the first time.

Michigan State University’s Mark Becker, lead investigator on the study, said he was surprised to find such a clear association between media multitasking and mental health problems. What’s not yet clear is the cause.

“We don’t know whether the media multitasking is causing symptoms of depression and social anxiety, or if it’s that people who are depressed Continue reading

Beating Depression with Natural Methods

Many folks treat their depression with psychotherapy or prescription antidepressant drugs. And though many experts think a combination of these two are effective, no scientific evidence supports this supposition. In reality, simple, natural measures like more sleep, exercise and efforts at sustaining a positive attitude work better to combat depression than medication. Continue reading

Walking through Doorways Causes Forgetting, New Research Shows

 

We’ve all experienced it: The frustration of entering a room and forgetting what we were going to do. Or get. Or find.

New research from University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Gabriel Radvansky suggests that passing through doorways is the cause of these memory lapses. Continue reading

The Serotonin System in Women’s Brains is Damaged more readily by Alcohol than that in Men’s Brains

After only four years of problem drinking, a significant decrease in the function of the serotonin system in women’s brains can be seen. This is the system that regulates such functions as impulse control and mood. It takes 12 years before a corresponding decrease is seen in men. This is the conclusion of multidisciplinary research carried out at the Department of Psychology and the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

The research group in the multidisciplinary project Gothenburg Alcohol Research Project (GARP) has studied for the first time three of the major neurotransmitter substances in the brain in a single individual. They have studied a group of women and a group of men with alcohol dependence. The results will be published in January 2012 in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

“We have used what is known as neuroendocrine techniques to show that it is principally the serotonergic system Continue reading

Clemson Researcher Says High Blood Pressure May Lead to Missed Emotional Cues

Your ability to recognize emotional content in faces and texts is linked to your blood pressure, according to a Clemson University researcher. Continue reading

Psychopathic Killers: Computerized Text Analysis uncovers the Word Patterns of a Predator

As words can be the soul’s window, scientists are learning to peer through it: Computerized text analysis shows that psychopathic killers make identifiable word choices – beyond conscious control – when talking about their crimes. Continue reading

Primary Schoolchildren that sleep less than 9 hours do not Perform

A study by the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB in Spanish) and Ramón Llull University have researched the relationship between the sleeping habits, hours slept, and academic performance of children aged between six and seven years of age. Experts have found that sleeping less than nine hours, going to bed late and no bedtime routine generally affects children’s academic skills.

“Most children sleep less than is recommended for their intellectual development, which is hindered because the lack of sleep cannot be recovered. This is the first Spanish study that proves that losing out on hours of sleep and bad habits affect schoolchildren’s academic performance,” stated Ramón Cladellas, researcher at the Faculty of Psychology at the UAB. Continue reading

Television Food Commercials Influencing Kids to Demand for Unhealthy Foods

Parents have suspected all along that television commercials are leading their kids to request sugary, fatty or salty foods, and now researchers at the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society in the U.K., have confirmed this suspicion.

A team of scientists found that children who watched commercials for fast food or unhealthy snacks before a cartoon were more likely to choose such foods after their program, when compared to kids who viewed advertisements for toys.

“Obesity in young children is now a major health concern around the world. Our studies highlight that there are global connections between advertising, food preferences and consumption,” said researcher Emma Boyland.

She noted that  Continue reading