Language Protein Differs in Males, Females

Findings could lead to greater understanding of sex differences in language acquisition

Male rat pups have more of a specific brain protein associated with language development than females, according to a study published February 20 in The Journal of Neuroscience. The study also found sex differences Continue reading

Majority of ‘Gluten-Free’ Foods Found to Contain GMOs

In the wake of all the recent revelations about the dangers of GMOs, a special warning needs to go out to all those health-conscious consumers buying “gluten-free” foods. As it turns out, most “gluten-free” foods sold in the USA contain genetically modified organisms.

Why is this so? Because the primary ingredient in most gluten-free foods is corn. And most corn-based foods are made with genetically modified corn. Around 85% of the conventional corn grown in the USA Continue reading

Shocking Findings in new GMO Study: Rats Fed Lifetime of GM Corn grow horrifying tumors, 70% of Female Die Early

Eating genetically modified corn (GM corn) and consuming trace levels of Monsanto’s Roundup chemical fertilizer caused rats to develop horrifying tumors, widespread organ damage, and premature death. That’s the conclusion of a shocking new study that looked at the long-term effects of consuming Monsanto’s genetically modified corn.

The study has been deemed “the most thorough research ever published into the health effects of GM food crops and the herbicide Roundup on rats.” News of the horrifying findings is spreading like wildfire across the internet, with even the mainstream media seemingly in shock over the photos of rats with multiple grotesque tumors… tumors so large the rats even had difficulty breathing in some cases. GMOs may be the new thalidomide. Continue reading

Strawberries Protect the Stomach from Alcohol

In an experiment on rats, European researchers have proved that eating strawberries reduces the harm that alcohol can cause to the stomach mucous membrane. Published in the open access journal Plos One, the study may contribute to improving the treatment of stomach ulcers.

A team of Italian, Serbian and Spanish researchers has confirmed the protecting effect that strawberries have in a mammal stomach that has been damaged by alcohol. Scientists gave ethanol (ethyl alcohol) to laboratory rats and, according to the study published in the journal Plos One, have thus proved that the stomach mucous membrane of those that had previously eaten strawberry extract suffered less damage.

Sara Tulipani, researcher at the University of Barcelona (UB) and co-author of the study explains Continue reading

Natural and Herbal Remedies for Chemotherapy Side Effects

BEVERLY HILLS- Looking for herbal remedies to combat chemotherapy side effects? Confused about which natural remedies work best? Worried about the safety of natural herbal remedies for treating chemotherapy side effects? Here are some safe natural alternatives for treating the side effects of

Ginger (for Nausea)

According to MSNBC News, a new study has accredited ginger capsules with providing significant nausea relief to chemotherapy patients. Patients in the study took ginger capsules for several days prior to therapy. Ginger is a common herbal remedy for stomach pain.

Ginseng (for Energy)

Side effects of chemotherapy treatments can leave the patient depleted. Toxins in chemotherapy medication take a heavy toll on the body. Ginseng as an herbal remedy can bring back vitality. In addition to providing energy, ginseng is felt to reduce stress and anxiety.

Peppermint (for Nausea)

Peppermint is a natural stomach soothing herbal remedy. Try a couple drops of peppermint extract in a glass of water to ease stomach discomfort after chemotherapy. This herbal remedy is easier than most for children undergoing chemotherapy.

Burdock (Blood Purifier)

This herbal remedy drives chemotherapy toxins from the body. Chemotherapy fills the body with toxins to kill cancer cells. Unfortunately these toxins have a negative effect on the rest of the human body as well. Burdock causes profuse sweating to drive toxins out of the body.

Sweating (to Release Toxins)

Many toxins are only released from the body through sweat glands. Exercise is essential for this natural remedy. Another good way to induce sweating is with a sauna. If a sauna is not available, try eating hot peppers or running a hot shower while behind closed bathroom doors.

Aloe (Soothe Stomach and Intestines)

Aloe Vera is a natural remedy for sunburns, cuts and scrapes. One of the side effects of chemotherapy is damage to the stomach and intestines. Aloe Vera juice can be purchased from the health food store as a natural drink. This home remedy heals the stomach and intestines of chemotherapy patients.

Omega 3 (Strengthen Immune System)

No natural remedy article is complete without the mention of Omega 3. This amino acid supplement comes in convenient capsule form. It will strengthen an immune system weakened by the side effects of chemotherapy.

Antioxidants (Strengthen Immune System)

Chemotherapy kills cancer cells. Unfortunately it also kills everything else. This is why Omega 3 and antioxidants are so important as natural remedies for chemotherapy side effects. Antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables fight free radicals and strengthen the immune system.

Novel Treatment Helps Paralyzed Rats Walk Again After Spinal-Cord Injury

Virtual stimuli and anxiety

LOS ANGELES – Experimenting on rats, a team of researchers at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) have found that a combination of drugs, electrical stimulation and regular exercise can enable paralyzed animals to walk, and even run again while supporting their full weight on a treadmill.

The researchers say that their findings suggest that the regeneration of severed nerve fibres is not required for paraplegic rats to learn to walk again.

According to them, their findings may hold implications for human rehabilitation after spinal cord injuries.

“The spinal cord contains nerve circuits that can generate rhythmic activity without input from the brain to drive the hind leg muscles in a way that resembles walking called ’stepping,’” Nature magazine quoted principal investigator Reggie Edgerton, a professor of neurobiology and physiological sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, as saying.

“Previous studies have tried to tap into this circuitry to help victims of spinal cord injury. While other researchers have elicited similar leg movements in people with complete spinal injuries, they have not achieved full weight-bearing and sustained stepping as we have in our study,” he added.

During the study, the researchers tested rats with complete spinal injuries that left no voluntary movement in their hind legs.

They set the paralyzed rats on a moving treadmill belt, then administered drugs that act on the neurotransmitter serotonin, and applied low levels of electrical currents to the spinal cord below the point of injury.

They observed that the combination of stimulation and sensation derived from the rats’ limbs moving on a treadmill belt triggered the spinal rhythm-generating circuitry, and prompted walking motion in the rats’ paralyzed hind legs.

The team says that daily treadmill training over several weeks eventually enabled the rats to regain full weight-bearing walking, including backwards, sideways and at running speed.

However, the injury still interrupted the brain’s connection to the spinal cord-based rhythmic walking circuitry, leaving the rats unable to walk of their own accord.

Neuro-prosthetic devices may bridge human spinal cord injuries to some extent, but so activating the spinal cord rhythmic circuitry as the UCLA team did may help in rehabilitation after spinal cord injuries.

A research article describing the study has been published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.