Carnitine Supplements: Good or Bad for You?

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You may have seen recent media reports about a scientific study suggesting that carnitine could be linked to heart disease. Carnitine – found in red meat, poultry, and fish and also available as a dietary supplement – Continue reading

Finally, the Truth Revealed About Gout

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Are you one of the millions of Americans who notices a throbbing pain in their toe, knee, or elbow after they eat a big steak dinner or have a tall glass of beer? If you are, then it could be related to this nasty culprit: gout.

Gout affects six million Americans and, as baby boomers age, the number is expected to rise. Continue reading

The Two Things You Need to Cure Sleep Apnea

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A new study has found a two-pronged approach to battling sleep apnea symptoms. Its health tip: combining a Mediterranean diet and regular physical activity could help you improve your night time rest.

The study looked at how the Mediterranean diet could help obese adults with sleep apnea Continue reading

Which Foods Are Best for the Brain?

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Diet is inextricably linked to conditions such as heart disease, obesity, and diabetes. However, what we consume also seems to have significant implications for the brain: Unhealthy diets may increase risk for psychiatric and neurologic conditions, such as depression and dementia, whereas healthy diets may be protective. Continue reading

The Two Things You Need to Cure Sleep Apnea

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A new study has found a two-pronged approach to battling sleep apnea symptoms. Its health tip: combining a Mediterranean diet and regular physical activity could help you improve your night time rest. Continue reading

The Decision on Red Meat

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Worried about eating beef? Don’t like all the bad press you’ve heard about red meat and disease? But what if you’d like to use red meat as a source of nutrients? Beef is, after all, the number one food source of protein, zinc, and vitamin B12, according to some researchers. Continue reading

Simple Dietary Changes Dramatically Slow down the Biological Clock

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In a nation obsessed with youthfulness, it is perplexing to find such a large percentage of the population needlessly succumbing to chronic inflammation – a condition known to age the body prematurely. Although willing to spend a great deal of money to artificially and temporarily mask the signs of aging, many seem reluctant to make substantive changes necessary to quell the flames within. These flames can affect all organ systems of the body. In truth, a few simple dietary and lifestyle changes could seriously slow down the biological clock.

The bigger question is this: Why are we all so inflamed?

The surprising thing about inflammation is that it is at the core of virtually every disease. In fact, if you were to look to medical journals in just about any medical specialty you would find Continue reading

Proper Nutrition is Vital in Reducing Vision Loss in Middle Age

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For people at a higher risk of losing central vision as they age, eating sufficient levels of certain dietary nutrients could help protect their eyes.

A new study finds that among people with a genetic susceptibility to macular degeneration — vision loss caused by erosion of the retina — those who ate higher levels of zinc, antioxidants, or omega-3 fatty acids cut their risk of developing the disease by as much as a third compared with those who ate lower levels of the nutrients.

“Therefore, clinicians should provide dietary advice to young susceptible individuals to postpone or prevent the vision-disabling consequences of (age-related macular degeneration),” the researchers wrote in the journal Archives of Ophthalmology. Age-related macular degeneration is common, accounting for half of all cases of blindness in developed countries, they note.

In the United States, the condition occurs  Continue reading

The Importance of Magnesium

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The essential element magnesium has important anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. A lack of it is associated with a wide range of medical problems, from heart irregularities to asthma. Unfortunately, because of our poor diets, many of us don’t get enough magnesium.

Magnesium deficiency is very common, especially in those who eat a Western diet high in red meats, fats, and sugars, and low in fresh fruits and vegetables. Also, carbonated sodas deplete the body’s supply of magnesium. Americans, both young and old, gulp down these dangerous sodas at a frantic pace. As many as 75 percent of Americans eat diets deficient in magnesium, and two-thirds of these people are significantly deficient.

Magnesium is critical for the healthy function of blood vessels as well as for every tissue and organ in the body. Consider some of its important functions:

• Produces energy Continue reading

The Importance of Checking your Iron Levels

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Are you age 20 or older with a diet high in red meats? Is your diet also low in vegetables? If you answered yes to these questions, then chances are good that your body has an iron overload.

An iron overload causes inflammation in the body, and excess iron plays a role in cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases. When iron levels are too high, they can precipitate rapid aging of tissues and bring on disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinsons disease, and ALS. High iron levels can also cause heart failure, stimulate atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke), trigger diabetes, and increase cancer risk. Continue reading