Using Contrasting Colors to Reduce Serving Sizes and Lose Weight

Choosing the right size and color of your bowls and plates could help you eat less, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. Continue reading

Regular Olive Oil Consumption Reduces Heart Stroke by 40%

Critical research released in the industry publication journal Neurology from the American Academy of Neurology provides evidence that regular consumption of olive oil can help lower the risk of stroke. The study examined individuals over the age of 65 that are most vulnerable to the devastating effects of a stroke. Scientists suggest that olive oil taken as part of a healthy diet can lower the life-altering risks associated with a stroke by 41% in the elderly. Based on this body of work, researchers “suggest that a new set of dietary recommendations should be issued to prevent stroke in people 65 and older.”

To conduct the study, researchers examined the medical records of 7,625 aging adults 65 or older from three cities in France. Participants were in generally good health and had no prior history of stroke. Olive oil consumption was determined by use of dietary questionnaire and usage was broken down into three groups (none, moderate and intense) based on regular consumption habits. It is significant to note that virtually Continue reading

Reduce your Exposure to Daily Petrochemicals

Petrochemicals cause cancer. They are also hormone disruptors, capable of contributing to hormone imbalances and premature puberty in children. We are all exposed to these chemicals every day, but we can also limit our exposure by taking simple measures in our daily lives. Some products, like air pollutants, are not in our control. However, there are many household items including the foods we eat and the fumes we breathe that may include hidden petrochemicals.

Children are especially susceptible to these carcinogens. It is estimated that children have at least three times the risk factor of adults for the development of cancer from these chemicals. Children’s relatively undeveloped livers are less effective in the metabolism of toxic chemicals. And small children  Continue reading

A Small Reduction of Carbohydrates Intake Slims Waistline

Excess abdominal fat has been linked to an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have recently found that reducing such fatty tissue may be a simple matter of reducing carbohydrates in a diet.

Dieters need not go to carb-free extremes, however, since the study revealed that just a modest decrease in bread, rice and simple sugars may help to significantly reduce belly fat.

Researchers measured the belly fat of participants on two different diets: one in which individuals derived 43 percent of their calories from carbs and 39 percent from fat, and another in which individuals ate 55 percent of their calories in carbohydrate form and 27 percent from fat. Both diets contained 18 percent protein. Continue reading

The Simple Act of Breastfeeding May significantly Reduce the Risk of SIDS

The sobering statistic is that every day approximately seven babies die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Recent research suggests the simple act of breastfeeding may significantly reduce the risk of this disease and the reduction may be particularly dramatic if the breastfeeding is exclusive of formula feeding: Health Day reports. The study published in the June 13 issue of Pediatrics found a 45% reduction in SIDS risk in babies who received any amount of breast milk and a whopping 73% reduction in those who were breastfed exclusively.

Aside from lowering SIDS risk, breast feeding provides other advantages. Experts widely regard breast milk as the best type of nourishment,  Continue reading

Reduce Rising Health Care Cost by Living Healthier Lifestyle

Heath care is expensive. Costs continue to mount despite recent efforts at health care “reform.”

Sally C. Pipes, the president, CEO and Taube Fellow in Health Care Studies at the Pacific Research Institute, argues in Forbes Magazine this week that the best way to lower costs is through expensive “medical innovation” (technology). Pipes claims that innovation alone will “minimize doctor visits, specialist referrals, round-the-clock care, trial-and-error surgeries” and other procedures in order “to deliver more value for less money in the long term.”

It is true that less use of the health care system in general will reduce costs. But does that mean we’ll actually be “healthy”? Innovation cannot make us healthier. The only way to achieve that  Continue reading