Modern Science Validates Light and Color Therapies in Promoting Full-Spectrum Health

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The ancient practices of phototherapy and chromotherapy are gaining momentum as valid science. Researchers are now able to study how light and color not only affect psychological behavior, but also physiological systems of the body. An article in The New York Times explores how color and light influence well-being in a variety of circumstance; from prison cells to neonatal units, Continue reading

Obese Individuals at Risk for Social Anxiety Disorder

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Researchers at Rhode Island Hospital have discovered that obese people may suffer from serious mental depression due to their weight. The study they conducted, which can be found online in the journal Depression and Anxiety, finds that obese individuals who suffer from anxiety due only to their weight may experience it as severely as those with social anxiety disorder (SAD).

The current criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual on Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) on SAD states that a person with a medical condition can be diagnosed with SAD only if their anxiety is unrelated to their medical condition. The research at Rhode Island Hospital concluded that obese people with weight-related anxiety experience significant social anxiety compared to individuals who have been diagnosed with SAD. Dr. Kristy Dalrymple, Ph.D., who led the study,  Continue reading

Light Therapy Could Brighten the Outlook for Depressed Seniors

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One in 20 people suffer from clinical depression in this country, and the rate is significantly higher among seniors. It’s higher still among senior women (women are twice as likely to be depressed as men). When you include the widespread prevalence of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) this time of year, it’s clear there’s big public health problem out there. New research findings in the Netherlands show that bright light therapy (BLT) may be part of the answer. Call it a lightbulb moment in the treatment of depression.

The details: The study of depression and light therapy involved 89 people aged 60 and over. Half received three weeks of one-hour-a-day BLT. For comparison, the others were “treated” with a pale, not therapeutically significant light for the same duration. Treatment sessions occurred in the early morning each day. At the end of three weeks, those receiving BLT experienced significant improvements in mood, sleep quality,  Continue reading

Different Anxiety Disorders

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Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders in the world. We take a look at these disorders.

Everybody feels anxious at times. Anxiety gears you up to face a threatening situation and rouses you to action. In general, it helps you cope.

But if you have an anxiety disorder, this normally helpful emotion can do just the opposite – it can keep you from coping and disrupt your daily life. Anxiety disorders aren’t just a case of “nerves”. They are illnesses, often related to the biological makeup and life experiences of the individual and they frequently run in families.

There are several types of anxiety disorders, each with its own distinct features. Many people have a single anxiety disorder. But it isn’t unusual for an anxiety disorder to be accompanied by another illness, such as depression, an eating disorder, substance abuse or another anxiety disorder.

What are the different types of anxiety disorders?

Phobias are the most common form of anxiety. (See the Post “ Phobias – 540 Common Phobias” . They are characterized by an intense, irrational and almost paralyzing fear of a specific situation or object. Adults with phobias realize their fears are irrational, but often facing, or even thinking about facing, the feared object or situation brings on a panic attack or severe anxiety.

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). People with GAD usually expect the worse and worry excessively about everyday life circumstances (such as their health, job, raising of children or finances), or minor matters (such as household chores or renovations – even just getting through the day becomes problematic). The person’s worries are much more than normal day-to-day anxiety. They are excessive, unrealistic, chronic and relentless.

Panic disorder. Panic attacks are characterized by a sudden rush of fear, usually accompanied by a pounding heart, shortness of breath, a choking or suffocating sensation or other physical symptoms. They often occur in response to a stressful situation or during a period of chronic emotional stress. Attacks can occur in the most familiar and seemingly non-threatening settings, at the grocery store, in church or while driving along a familiar road. Sufferers often describe a feeling of unreality during the attack. Someone experiencing a panic attack may feel on the verge of losing control or even dying.

Obsessive-Compulsive disorder (OCD). OCD is characterized by obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are persistent, intrusive and unwanted thoughts; compulsions are repetitive behaviors or mental acts, often linked to obsessions. The obsessions and compulsions are distressing and time-consuming and often lead to impairment in functioning.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). As a result of exposure to traumatic events, many people display symptoms such as intrusive memories of the event, nightmares, avoiding reminders of the event, feeling anxious or down, detachment from others, and a restricted range of emotions. A diagnosis of PTSD is made if these symptoms are present for more than three months and interfere with functioning.

Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD), also called Social Phobia, is an intense, persistent fear of being humiliated or embarrassed in social situations. Sufferers tend to think other people are very competent in public and that they are not. Small mistakes make appear much more serious than they really are. Blushing may seem painfully embarrassing, and they feel as though all eyes are focused on them. Exposure to the feared social situation or anticipation of the situation can produce an intense and immediate anxiety reaction, including physiological symptoms such as sweating and blushing.