Reduce Memory Loss with Luteolin Found In Celery

The health benefits of celery are often overlooked because it is generally thought of as “crunchy water” and assumed to have no nutritional value. Continue reading

Kegel Exercises for Men

If you’re a guy and don’t know what Kegel exercises are, then read on. Kegel exercises are probably the easiest and most convenient exercises you can do to help improve your urinary, prostate and sexual health, and you can do them without putting on athletic shoes or breaking a sweat. In fact, no one will even know you are doing these exercises, even if you’re in a crowd or waiting in line at the bank. Continue reading

Natural Help for Erectile Dysfunction

The first step to naturally lowering your risk of impotence is to step out the door. Exercises like walking three hours per week drop your risk of having erectile dysfunction by 30 percent.1 And along with physical activity, a wide variety of herbs can also boost your sexual life.

The Value of Movement

If you’re an immovable object, your sex life isn’t likely to budge, either. An analysis of 31,742 men age 53 to 90 reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2003 shows that exercise keeps you leaner and fit for sex, as well as mentally more ready for sexual interaction.

Stress Obstructions Continue reading

When Erectile Dysfunction isn’t Whole Story

For men with erectile dysfunction (ED), 65 percent are unable to have an orgasm and 58 percent have problems with ejaculation, according to new research led by physician-scientists at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

The study followed 12,130 men with mild to severe ED and is the largest-ever analysis of orgasmic and ejaculatory dysfunction. Results are published in today’s edition of the British Journal of Urology International.

Approximately 30 million American men, or half of all men aged 40 to 70, have trouble achieving or sustaining an erection. “While medications like Viagra or Cialis have been successful in helping many of these men, our research suggests there are other common sexual issues that remain largely unaddressed,” says Dr. Darius Paduch, the study’s lead author; male sexual medicine specialist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center; and assistant professor of urology Continue reading

Weight Loss Improves Sexual Health of Overweight Men with Diabetes

A new study published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine reveals that in obese men with type 2 diabetes, weight loss improves erectile function, sexual desire and lowers urinary tract symptoms.

Researchers led by Professor Gary Wittert, MBBch, MD, FRACP, FRCP, of the University of Adelaide studied 31 obese men with type 2 diabetes over 8 weeks. The men received either a meal replacement-based low-calorie diet or a low-fat, high-protein, reduced-carbohydrate diet prescribed to decrease intake by 600 calories a day.

In obese men with type 2 diabetes, results found that, a modest weight loss of 5%, resulted in a rapid reversal of sexual and urinary problem, within 8 weeks,  Continue reading

Restoring Sexual Function Using a Traditional Chinese Medicine Approach

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) takes a holistic approach to improving sexual performance. By boosting your “essence of life,” TCM rebalances your internal forces and restores libido in ways that acknowledge the interconnections of all the aspects of your health.

TCM views the human body as an organic whole. As such, the various parts of the body are inseparable in structure; individual organ functions are related to and influenced by the function of other organs, the mind, physical actions and the environment. Nothing is viewed as separate. Although many Westerners have difficulty grasping TCM’s strange vocabulary, its techniques are of great benefit. Continue reading

Introducing – Yohimbe

Introducing – Yohimbe

Alternate Names: Pausinystalia yohimbe

Yohimbe is an evergreen tree that grows in western Africa in Nigeria, Cameroon, the Congo and Gabon.

The bark of the tree contains the active compounds called alkaloids. The principal alkaloid is called yohimbine.

Yohimbine is a prescription drug in the United States for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Its popularity has waned since the introduction of Viagra.

Yohimbe bark extracts are also sold in health food stores and online. In Germany, it is not approved for use. Yohimbe can cause a dangerous rise in blood pressure, as well as anxiety and other side effects.

Why Do People Use Yohimbe?

Traditionally, yohimbe was used in Africa for fever, coughs, leprosy, and as an aphrodisiac. Today, yohimbe is promoted for the following conditions:

    * Erectile dysfunction

      Yohimbe bark extracts are widely promoted online and in health food stores as a natural aphrodisiac to increase libido and treat erectile dysfunction. However, there is no evidence to show that the herbal supplements work. Most clinical studies have looked at the drug yohimbine and not the herbal extract yohimbe.

      Yohimbine has been found to relax and dilate blood vessels in the penis, resulting in increased blood flow and erection. It may also stimulate areas in the brain involved in sexual desire.

      Studies on the effectiveness of yohimbine have had conflicting findings. For organic erectile dysfunction (erectile dysfunction caused by a physical problem), one small uncontrolled study found that yohimbine was beneficial for men with organic erectile dysfunction. Another study found it was no more effective than a placebo.

      Yohimbine appears to work better for erectile dysfunction not caused by a physical problem. A German study examined whether 30 mg/day of yohimbine for 4 weeks would help men with erectile dysfunction not due to a physical problem. Yohimbine was found to be more effective than placebo (71% vs 45%).

      To date, there have been no studies comparing yohimbine to newer drugs such as Viagra.

    * Weight Loss

      Yohimbine has been found to increase lipolysis by increasing the release of norepinephrine available to fat cells and blocking alpha-2 receptor activation. However, a controlled study found that 43 mg/day yohimbe had no effect on body weight, body mass index, body fat, fat distribution, and cholesterol levels.

    * Depression

      Yohimbe has been promoted as a herbal remedy for depression, because it blocks an enzyme called monoamine oxidase. However, this is only found in higher doses (over 50 mg/day), which is potentially unsafe.

Safety

In Germany, yohimbe is on the Commission E (the country’s herbal regulatory agency). list of unapproved herbs because of concerns about the herb’s safety and effectiveness. In the United States, the FDA has had a number of reports of seizures and kidney failure following the use of yohimbe.

Yohimbe is not recommended because it has a very narrow therapeutic index. There is a relatively small dosing range–below it, the herb doesn’t work and above it the herb is toxic. Side effects of normal dosages may include dizziness, nausea, insomnia, anxiety, rapid heartbeat, and increased blood pressure. As little as 40 mg a day can cause severe side effects, such as dangerous changes in blood pressure, hallucinations, paralysis. Overdose can be fatal.

Because yohimbe blocks the enzyme monoamine oxidase, people taking yohimbe must avoid all tyramine-containing foods (e.g., liver, cheeses, red wine) and over-the-counter products that contain the ingredient phenylpropanolamine, such as nasal decongestants.

People with kidney or liver disease, stomach ulcers, heart disease, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, post-traumatic stress disorder, and panic disorder should not take yohimbe.

Yohimbe should not be taken by pregnant or nursing women, children, or elderly people.

Yohimbe should not be combined with antidepressant drugs unless under the supervision of a physician.

Males Experience Loss of Libido During Hepatitis-C Therapy

WASHINGTON – Loss of libido and impaired sex is common among those undergoing antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, according to a new study.

This is the first time a study evaluating the combination therapy, peginterferon and ribavirin, has identified sexual dysfunction (inability to fully enjoy sexual intercourse) as a side effect.

The therapy has the potential to affect all three components of sexual health: desire, function and satisfaction.

Before therapy, 37 percent of men reported at least some degree of diminished desire, while 44 percent reported dissatisfaction with their sexual life. Besides, 22 percent reported poor erection and 26 percent reported poor ejaculation.

The average onset of sexual dysfunction appeared to be within four weeks of starting antiviral therapy, and many patients reported a gradual worsening over time.

At the end of therapy (24 or 48 weeks), an estimated 38 percent to 48 percent of men reported that overall sexual function was worse than before treatment.

As part of the Study of Viral Resistance to Antiviral Therapy of Chronic Hepatitis C (VIRAHEP-C), 260 men treated with peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin completed self-administered questionnaires concerning sexual desire, sexual function – including erectile and ejaculatory function – and sexual satisfaction before, during and after treatment.

These findings were presented in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute.