Why Your Body Changes When You Age-And How to Slow It Down

ageIt’s easy to get trapped in the mind frame that your health diminishes naturally as you age. You may find yourself getting a little slower, a little softer, and slightly more prone to pain and sickness.

The body goes through changes as you age. Once you hit 45, you start losing muscle mass at a rate of Continue reading

Stress Is Top Cause of Workplace Sickness and is so Widespread its Dubbed the ‘Black Death of the 21st Century’

Stress has become the most common reason for a worker being signed off long-term sick, a report reveals today.

Experts said the psychological condition had become so widespread that it was the ‘21st century equivalent of the Black Death’.

Stress has even eclipsed stroke, heart attack, cancer and back problems, according to the report from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

Jill Miller, an adviser to the institute, says the report ‘highlights the heightened pressure many people feel under in the workplace as a result of the prolonged economic downturn’. Continue reading

The Differences between Traditional and Alternative Medicine

There is a big difference between traditional and alternative medicine, but the goals are the same. Both styles of medical care are aimed at treating and preventing illness using very different practices and methods. These days more and more people are advocating for a combination of both practices to achieve a more balanced level of health care, though. Following is an explanation of the differences between traditional and alternative medicine.

Traditional medicine is what doctors and other health practitioners at clinics, hospitals and primary care facilities practice in the United States and other Western countries. This style of medicine includes annual doctor’s visits and treatment of ailments using drugs, medical procedures and surgical operations. There is more of a focus on treatment rather than prevention, although this is starting to change.

Alternative medicine uses a more natural, holistic approach to healing. There are many Chinese medicine techniques used in alternative medicine, and most of the approaches are focused more on maintaining health and preventing health problems rather than treating ailments. Methods such as acupuncture, massage and chiropractic do focus on treating various conditions that cause pain, though, so there are alternative medicine methods that are used for treatment as well as for prevention.

The biggest differences between traditional and alternative medicine have to do with the approach to treating a problem. While a patient with a cough would go to a traditional doctor and be advised to take a cough suppressant, for example, an alternative medicine practitioner might look into the underlying causes of the cough and help prevent it from coming back again. Treatments such as acupuncture, acupressure, chiropractic care, diet, exercise, herbal remedies, massage, meditation and yoga are popular in alternative medicine. Traditional medicine practitioners focus on drugs as well as diet, exercise, surgical procedures and prevention by quitting smoking and ending other bad health habits.

More and more people are choosing to combine alternative and traditional medicine to maintain their health and treat their ailments. With more people demanding alternative medicine in the Western healthcare market, it is sure to become more accepted and readily available in the United States.

Lack of Food Puts Kids at Risk for Asthma, Other Chronic Ills

 Children and youth who don’t have enough to eat are at increased risk of poor health, and repeated episodes of hunger may put them at risk for chronic diseases such as asthma, researchers say.

 The finding is from an analysis of data from a Canadian survey of 5,809 children aged 10 to 15 years and 3,333 youth aged 16 to 21 years, which was conducted from 1994 to 2004-2005.

 During that time, 3.3 percent of children and 3.9 percent of youth experienced hunger at some point and 1.1 percent of children and 1.4 percent of youth went hungry on two or more occasions, the study found.

 In the final round of the survey, 13.5 percent of children and 28.6 percent of youth reported poor health. Rates of poor health among those who’d experienced hunger at some point were higher than among those who had never gone hungry (32.9 percent of children and 47.3 percent of youth who had gone hungry were in poor health, compared with 12.8 percent of children and 27.9 percent of youth who had not).

 The researchers also found that youth who went hungry more than once during the survey were at increased risk for asthma and other chronic illnesses.

 Sharon Kirkpatrick, of the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, at the time of the study and now at the U.S. National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues published their findings in the August issue of the journal Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

 In 2008, about 15 percent of American households were affected by food insecurity, defined by the researchers as running out of food or lacking the money to buy food. That’s an increase from 11 percent in 2007 and the highest rate since monitoring began in 1995, according to background information in the study.

 “The mechanism by which childhood hunger negatively affects health is not well understood,” Kirkpatrick’s team wrote. “Food insecurity has been associated with emotional and psychological stress among children, which could exert a negative effect on general health and contribute to heightened risk of chronic diseases.”

 The findings add to evidence that “hunger is a serious risk factor for long-term poor health among children and youth, pointing to the relevance of severe food insecurity as an identifiable marker of vulnerability,” the study authors concluded.