Natural Ways to Banish Colds and Flu

Once the temperature drops, cold and flu season looms over health like dark storm clouds. Our fast-paced lifestyles, holiday travels and festivities, along with seasonal changes lead most of us to believe that colds and flu are inevitable facts of winter. But a healthy diet, lifestyle choices and supplementation offers protection year-round with natural solutions that help strengthen your defenses and keep you vibrant and energized.

Cold or Flu? Know the Difference

As an integrative physician, my patients often come to me with an important question: “How can I tell whether I have a cold or the flu?”

Both colds and flu are respiratory illnesses, but each is caused by different viruses. Colds are usually milder and present symptoms that include nasal stuffiness, sneezing and a runny nose. Adults and older children generally have minimal or no fever, but infants and toddlers often run a fever in the 100-102 degrees Fahrenheit range. Depending on which virus is the offender, a cold may also produce a headache, cough, postnasal drip, burning eyes, muscle aches or a decreased appetite — but the most prominent cold symptoms are usually in the nasal passages. Continue reading

Controlling a Troublesome Bladder

Loss of bladder control is so common that studies have suggested that as many as four in 10 people get one case of urinary incontinence a year — and 14% get it every day. Up to 20 million Americans suffer from incontinence; roughly 75% are women. Control over your bladder can slip just like vision starts to fade or your movement starts to slow. This story addresses this common issue and offers some natural remedies.

The three main types of urinary incontinence are urge, stress, and mixed. Those with urge incontinence have an overactive bladder and feel a sudden urge to urinate. (Bed-wetting is common, as the urge can strike every two hours.) Stress incontinence occurs when stress or pressure is put on the abdomen, such as with laughing, coughing, sneezing, and rising out of a chair. Continue reading

Natural Cures for Ear Aches, Allergies, and Sinus Infections

Natural Cure Strategies for Sinus Infections & Ear Aches

Years of research for Ear ache prevention, found that repeated allergies, sinus, and ear aches are the result of a “weakened immune system” mainly due to “antibiotic overuse.” Antibiotics kill good and bad bacteria in the colon resulting in poor digestion and impaired absorption of nutrients. In addition to impairing the absorption of nutrients, antibiotics impair the mucosa (the inner lining of the small intestines) so toxins that should normally exit the body, get absorbed into the blood stream instead. Toxins in the blood stream can cause various allergic reactions such as hives, body aches, sneezing, itching, and a runny nose. Runny noses and fluid buildup provide the breeding ground for bacterial sinus infections and ear aches / ear pain.

The first step toward long-term healing of earaches is to supplement with Lactobacillus Acidophilus (friendly flora), which is a  Continue reading

Flood Water Can Turn Air in Homes Unhealthy according to Allergists.

Homeowners whose houses are flooding with the recent heavy rains should take extra precautions if they suffer from allergies or asthma, say allergists.

During a flood cleanup, indoor air quality in the home may appear to be the least of the problems. However, failure to remove contaminated materials and to reduce moisture and humidity can present serious long-term health risks. Standing water and wet materials quickly lead to, among other things, mold growth, to which many are allergic. The symptoms of mold allergy are very similar to the symptoms of other allergies and asthma, such as sneezing, itching, nasal discharge, congestion and cough and wheezing.

“One of the biggest issues homeowners will face is what to do about  Continue reading

The Purpose of Sneezing

Birmingham – The purpose of sneezing, self evidently, is to dislodge irritating particles from the lining of the nose – and very effectively, too. It starts with a series of inspirations that fill the lungs with large volumes of air. Then the combination of their elastic recoil and the action of the muscles in the chest wall hurtle the air out again at a speed of one hundred feet per second to a distance of six feet or more.

These rapid fluctuations of pressure within the chest can sometimes have the most adverse of consequences – causing, as recently reported, 52-year-old solicitor Veronica Kenny to fracture her spine. The resulting pain and lack of mobility prevented her from working until an operation to fit a supportive metal cage put her back on her feet again.

 Sneezing is also a well known, if rare, precipitant of a stroke and has been reported to cause retinal detachment and miscarriages. For the same reason the great seventeenth century physician and discoverer of the circulation of the blood William Harvey would induce sneezing in women in obstructed labor to accelerate the process of childbirth. Called to a woman who had “fallen into a swoon” he thrust a feather with strong sneezing powder towards her nostrils. “By this she was aroused. As often as I applied the feather to her, her delivery was advanced – and finally a healthy living child was born.”