Treating Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Pregnancy May Improve Fetal Health

Treatment of mild sleep-disordered breathing in women with preeclampsia reverses low fetal activity levels and may improve fetal outcomes

A new study suggests that treatment of mild sleep-disordered breathing with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in pregnant women Continue reading

What You Eat May Be Ruining Your Sleep

Today’s health news concerns a certain waste product produced by your body when you digest foods. It’s called uric acid, and it’s formed when your body breaks down purine—a substance found in organ meats and some types of fish. Normally, uric acid is carried in your blood, passes through your kidneys, Continue reading

Turn Down the Volume to Lift Your Health

Medical research has uncovered a danger to your health that can increase blood pressure, boost the chance of a heart attack or stroke, cause tumors, result in insomnia, impair work performance, raise your stress level and lead to hearing loss. The menace: The volume control on your iPod or MP3 player as well as the traffic outside your window. Our noisy world is threatening our well-being in frightening ways. Continue reading

Treat Sleep Apnea Non-Surgically and Prevent Other Medical Complications

saDid you know…there is a simple, non-surgical solution to treat sleep apnea and the many serious risks and health problems that go along with it? Continue reading

A Simple Solution to Snoring

Getting out of your chair regularly might have an unlikely benefit, says a Toronto sleep researcher: reduced snoring.

Douglas Bradley, director of the Toronto Research Institute’s Sleep Research Laboratory, has linked excessive sitting to sleep apnea, a condition where a sleeping person’s throat collapses, stopping breathing and interrupting sleep.

The culprit is fluid that gathers in the legs during long stretches of sitting. When you lie down at night, that fluid moves to your neck, where when your muscles relax, your airway can get sucked shut “like a wet straw,” he says.

Bradley  Continue reading

Introducing – MSM

Other names: methyl sulfonyl methane

MSM (methyl sulfonyl methane) is a compound found naturally in foods such as cow’s milk, meat, seafood, fruits and vegetables.

MSM is thought to work by contributing sulfur. It’s found in capsule or tablet forms. MSM is also available as a cream or lotion, although evidence suggests it can’t be absorbed through skin.

Why Do People Use MSM

Osteoarthritis

Two small studies suggest MSM may reduce osteoarthritis pain. MSM is often combined with glucosamine in commercial arthritis products. It’s thought to work because of the sulfur, which is believed to strengthen collagen. More evidence is needed.

Interstitial cystitis

MSM has been proposed as a treatment for interstitial cystitis, although human studies are needed.

Snoring

One small, preliminary study found that MSM resulted in quieter snoring.

MSM has been explored for cancer prevention, scleroderma, allergies and constipation.

Side Effects and Safety

Side effects with MSM are rare but may include stomach upset, headache and diarrhea. One study suggested MSM was safe for up to 12 weeks.

The safety of MSM in pregnant or nursining women, children, or people with liver or kidney disease, however, isn’t known.

Novel Minimally Invasive Technique to Treat Snoring

SAN DIEGO – Scientists have suggested a novel, minimally invasive procedure that may help treat patients who snore.

They said that radiofrequency ablation, a procedure that uses heat to shrink the tissue of the soft palate, could be an effective treatment option for snoring.

In the study conducted over the period of three years, the team assessed the efficacy and morbidity of combined radiofrequency of the soft palate and partial uvulectomy in 60 patients.

Due to its minimally invasive character, significant improvement of primary snoring (snoring without sleep apnea), and low postoperative complication rates, radiofrequency surgery of the soft palate in general has become widespread.

However, the long-term clinical efficacy of radiofrequency surgery of the soft palate in primary snoring was limited.

The study showed that compared with the preoperative snoring score, the severity of snoring was reduced after two treatment sessions of combined radiofrequency.

Seventy-six percent of the patients were satisfied to receive this operative treatment, after three-year follow-up.

Primary snoring may be an early predictor for people who will eventually develop obstructive sleep apnea. In contrast to obstructive sleep apnea, no generally accepted gold standard is available for the treatment of primary snoring.

The findings were presented at American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting and OTO EXPO in San Diego.