25 Disturbing Facts about Psych Drugs, Soldiers and Suicides

We are living in an age of upside-downs, where right is wrong, fiction is truth and war is peace. Those who fight the wars are subjected to their own house of mirrors via pharmaceutical “treatments.” Instead of providing U.S. soldiers and veterans with actual health care, the government throws pills at them and calls it “therapy.” Continue reading

U.S Marines Turn to Meditation Training to Relieve Extreme Stress among Soldiers

Through a dozen years of war, the U.S. military’s operational tempo (OPTEMPO) has taken a horrendous toll on both equipment and personnel, with the Marine Corps, arguably taking the brunt of the combat. As the Pentagon’s smallest force, Marine units deployed frequently to Iraq and continue to deploy too often to Afghanistan.

Equipment can be replaced but the Corps’ most valuable asset – Continue reading

Virtual Reality Tops Standard Therapy in Treatment of PTSD

Soldiers stricken with post-traumatic stress disorder following their service are seeing a new ray of hope in the form of virtual reality immersion.

As increasingly larger numbers of soldiers return from duty in the Middle East, doctors are scrambling Continue reading

Emergency Medicine Physicians Develop Device to Stop Lethal Bleeding in Soldiers

Two emergency medicine physicians with wartime experience have developed a weapon against one rapidly lethal war injury. Continue reading

New Composite Material May Restore Damaged Soft Tissue

Potential uses include facial reconstruction for soldiers’ blast injuries

Biomedical engineers at Johns Hopkins have developed a new liquid material that in early experiments in rats and humans shows promise in restoring damaged soft tissue relatively safely and durably. The material, a composite of biological and synthetic molecules, is injected under the skin, then “set” using light to form a more solid structure, like using cold to set gelatin in a mold. The researchers say the product one day could be used to reconstruct soldier’s faces marred by blast injuries.

The Hopkins researchers caution that the material, described in a report in the July 27 issue of Science Translational Medicine, is “promising,” but not yet ready for widespread clinical use. Continue reading