Dosages for Natural Allopathic Medicine

Offering a revolution in medicine, that any  person, patient, doctor or alternative healthcare practitioner can practice,  Natural Allopathic Medicine offers hope in the 21st century to rich  and poor alike. This chapter is an overview of dosages for most of the Natural  Allopathic protocol. Continue reading

Can A Spoonful of Honey Reverse Allergies?

This is a FACT.

As the seasons change, allergy sufferers brace themselves. If you’ve been searching for a natural allergies remedy you might want to consider local honey.

The science is fascinating but the idea is a very simple one. Continue reading

Protect Your Skin from Sun Damage with This Herb

Today’s health advice comes in the form of an herbal cream. Calendula, or pot marigold, is a hardy annual herb. These plants have brightly colored flowers and you are likely familiar with them. They are a staple in many front- yard gardens. The petals of the flowers are actually edible and can be used either fresh or dry to add color to rice and salads. Continue reading

Fight Asthma with the Sun

More than 20 million adults in the United States have been diagnosed with asthma. Furthermore, 9 million American children suffer from the problem, making it the most prevalent chronic condition in children. But research into this breathing difficulty reveals that help is as close as the nearest sunlight. The vitamin D that your skin makes from the sun can improve the control of asthma.

Treating A Widespread Illness

The most often prescribed asthma medications range from short-acting beta agonists (such as albuterol) to inhaled corticosteroids (such as Asmanex and Qvar) to leukotriene modifiers (such as Singulair and Zyflo) to combination inhalers containing corticosteroids and long-acting beta agonists (such as Advair and Symbicort).

As is the case with most drugs, asthma medications come with attendant side effects. Some side effects brought about by asthma drugs are localized and appear in only one part of the body. These include reflex cough, bronchospasm, oral candidiasis or thrush, and dysphonia (hoarseness). Others are systemic and the effects are seen throughout the body. These include decreased bone density, poor growth, cataracts and glaucoma, adrenal gland suppression, Disseminated Varicella Infection (chicken pox that spreads to organs), and easy bruising. Continue reading

Why You Need Sunshine for Optimal Health

Discover How Sunlight Helps Heal Almost Every Known Health Condition–and How You Can
Bask in the Sun without the Risk of Overexposure

If you’re like most people, you probably think that getting a sufficient amount of safe sun exposure daily is not that important.  Unfortunately, you’re mistaken.  Insufficient sun exposure puts you at risk of serious medical problems, from bone fractures … to cognitive impairment … to cancer!

Vitamin D, which is known as the “sunshine vitamin,” is produced by the body in response to sunlight.  The latest statistics show that 1/3 of all Americans are deficient in vitamin DContinue reading

People Who Avoid the Sun Need More Vitamin D

A team of scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine recently found that following a dermatologist’s advice to stay out of the sun may leave people with a deficiency in vitamin D.

Authors of the study said their findings highlight the fine balance between protecting one’s skin and getting adequate amounts of vitamin D, a nutrient which tends to be lacking in typical American diets but is essential to maintaining good health.

“It’s not as simple as telling everyone to wear sunscreen,” said dermatologist Eleni Linos, M.D., Ph.D. “We may instead need to begin tailoring our recommendations to the skin tones and lifestyles of individual patients. It’s clearly a very complex issue.” Continue reading

Getting a Grip on Childhood Obesity

American adults are overweight and obese, which is a huge problem for our healthcare system, tax dollars, productivity and quality of life. But the fact that our kids are increasingly obese means we may be dooming the next generation to an unhappy lifetime of chronic disease. We have to take action now to halt the juvenile obesity epidemic, or the consequences will be tragic.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), “Obesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States — triple the rate from just one generation ago.” That 17 percent equates to 12.5 million obese children, ages 2 to 19.

In its 2011 “Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report,” the CDC blames a good part of this problem on the serving and advertising of “sugar drinks and less healthy foods on school campuses.” Ads sell junk foods to kids, while parents feed their children what they ask for instead of providing balanced meals. Added to that, kids are eating supersized portions of foods containing too much sugar and fat.

If we consider the alarming numbers of inner-city children with weight problems, it’s obvious that kids don’t get enough exercise and don’t have access to safe places to play. Even for those interested in outdoor activity, finding a safe place or even getting to one is an issue. In its “State Indicator Report on Physical Activity,  Continue reading

The Benefits of Sea Salts

Believe it or not, salt is good for your health! But why do we often hear our doctors advise us to stay away from salt or salt-treated foods? Yet we need salt to balance our diet. So are all salts the same? What really makes sea salt different from a regular salt? Let us take a closer look on the big difference between regular table salt and sea salt.

Our old table salt is highly refined, going through a process that removes the magnesium and trace minerals. Various additives are added, like aluminum compound to keep it dry. The natural iodine is destroyed during its refining process and only added back in the form of potassium iodide. As for sea salt, it is naturally dried under the heat of the sun. Therefore retains its natural iodine from the sea. It also means there is still large mineral content. With sea salt you don’t need to use too much of it since it has much stronger flavor than table salt.

According to Ayurveda doctors, sea salts are the most beneficial forms of salt because they don’t increase the sodium content of blood,  Continue reading

Scientists Admit Sunlight Can Prevent Cancer

Since the 1980s, physicians and cancer groups have regularly warned the public against the potential health dangers of direct sunlight on skin. As a result, many people have stayed out of the sunlight completely, covered their limbs even in warm weather or slathered themselves with UV protection products, all in the interest of lowering their risk of melanomas.

However, more recent findings indicate that this kind of nearly vampiric avoidance of the sun may not benefit your cancer odds after all.

A 2009 study by a group of Leeds University researchers found that higher levels of Vitamin D were linked to improved skin cancer survival odds. Other studies have found  Continue reading

Safest Sunscreen to Use is Nano Zinc Oxide

The debate about sunscreens rages on. Dermatologists advise slathering up every day. Nutritionists and holistic doctors advise sun exposure to get vitamin D. Some even say sunscreens cause cancer, and a disturbing study showed that people who used more commercial sunscreen had more melanoma.

Where is the truth? We might never know. Sunscreen manufacturers need to sell their product and natural sunscreen companies have little money for research. The FDA is mute and has never said that sunscreens prevent skin cancer. It is clear that commercial sunscreen ingredients (like oxybenzone and methoxycinnamate) are potent hormone disruptors and potential carcinogens. My advice is to never use these commercial sunscreens.

What should you do? Be judicious and safe. Get sun exposure. It is the best and most reliable source of vitamin D. But avoid sunburn, which damages the skin and may increase your risk of skin cancer. Avoid baking in the sun at midday, especially those first days of summer or your beach vacation. Gradually build your tan. Wear a hat to protect your face from sunburn.

If your kids are at camp or swimming  Continue reading

Want a Natural Sunscreen? Try this Homemade Recipe

Natural sunscreen is a gentle and effective method of protecting the skin from sun damage. While commercial products often offer extreme protection, they may cause irritation in some individuals. If sensitive skin is an issue or you just prefer a more natural approach, try a natural sunscreen recipe before you hit the beach next time.

Materials

Green tea leaves, which can be purchased at local natural health stores, are required for this natural sunscreen recipe. You also may use green tea bags, which can be found in your local supermarket. Sesame oil, beeswax, powdered benzoin and aloe vera gel are also needed. Sesame oil can be purchased from the grocery store, while beeswax, benzoin and aloe gel are found in natural health stores or ordered online. Additional required equipment includes a double boiler,  Continue reading

Good Sources of Vitamin D

Benefits of Vitamin D
Vitamin D is increasingly being viewed as important. It’s well known for working with calcium to strengthen your bones, but it may also help prevent osteoarthritis, reduce your risk of certain cancers, fight inflammation, and help regulate blood pressure.

Recommended Amount: How Much You Need
There’s mounting evidence to support a bump in the daily dose of vitamin D. While the government recommendations are 400 international units (IU) per day if you’re under 70 years of age and 600 IU if you’re over 70, several members of the RealAge Scientific Advisory Board now recommend taking 1,000 IU of vitamin D if you’re under 60 years of age and 1,200 IU if you’re over 60. The daily upper intake level for D is 2,000 IU a day — so anything up to that is generally considered safe.

Good Sources of Vitamin D
There are three ways to get vitamin D: food, sunlight, and supplements. If you’re not getting enough from your diet, or you don’t spend much time outdoors (just 10–20 minutes in the sun can significantly boost your body’s production of vitamin D), take a daily vitamin D supplement.

Salmon, canned (3 ounces) 530 IU
Salmon, cooked (3.5 ounces) 240–360 IU
Tuna, canned (3 ounces) 200 IU
Soymilk, fortified (8 ounces) 100 IU
Orange juice, fortified (8 ounces) 100 IU
Milk, low fat, fortified (8 ounces) 98 IU
Cereal, fortified (1 cup) 40–50 IU
Eggs (1 large) 20–26 IU
Swiss cheese (1 ounce) 12 IU

Novel Two-Step Chemical Process Makes Cancer Cells Glow Quickly, Safely

Novel Two-Step Chemical Process Makes Cancer Cells Glow Quickly, Safely

BOSTON – Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a two-step process that uses a chemical reaction to make live cancer cells light up quickly and safely.

This attains significance because scientists generally label cells with colored or glowing chemicals to observe how basic cellular activities differ between healthy and cancerous cells, but existing techniques are either too slow or too toxic to perform on live cells.

Under the novel process, chemically modified antibodies first home in on cancer cells, and then a chemical reaction called cycloaddition transfers a dye onto the antibody making the cancer cells glow when viewed through a microscope.

Philip Dawson, a member of Faculty of 1000 Biology and leading authority in chemistry and cell biology, reviewed a study and observed that the novel cycloaddition reaction is fast, very specific, and requires minimal manipulation of the cells.

He comments that, in combining antibody binding with the cycloaddition, “low signal-to-noise ratios are achieved”.

He points out that the new labeling technique could be used to track the location and activity of anti-cancer drugs, the location of cancer-specific proteins within the cell, or to visualize cancer cells inside a living organism.

Dawson concludes that cycloaddition will allow scientists to observe live cancer cells in the body, leading to a better understanding of cancer’s basic processes.

Breast Tissue Feature Could Predict Woman’s Cancer Risk

ROCHESTER – Certain structural features within breast tissue can indicate a woman’s individual cancer risk, say Mayo Clinic researchers.

The findings appear in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

The study shows that acini (AS-ih-nye), the small milk-producing elements in breast lobules, can be counted in sample biopsies. The percentage of acini present per lobule at a given age indicates cancer risk.

“Aside from the predictors of heredity, there is no effective independent predictor of risk of breast cancer,” says Lynn Hartmann, M.D., Mayo Clinic oncologist and senior author of the study.

“This risk estimate model based on novel tissue in each individual may provide a reliable strategy,” the expert added.

To reach the conclusion, researchers studied the tissue structures in 85 patients with breast cancer and examined earlier, noncancerous breast biopsies from the same women. They compared them to 142 age-controlled samples from Mayo’s Benign Breast Disease Cohort, a bio repository of benign biopsy tissues. Then, researchers developed the model and tested a risk prediction for each patient.

For the same women, they used the existing Gail model to make five-year risk predictions for the same women. While helpful in determining increased risk in groups of women, the Gail model is only slightly better than a guess when it comes to predicting cancer for an individual, the researchers say.

“Women who were more likely to develop breast cancer had larger lobules with more acini,” explains Dr. Hartmann.

As women age, especially as they approach menopause, the risk of breast cancer declines because the lobules and acini disappear. This natural process, called involution, is at the core of this risk factor.

Dr. Hartmann says if the lobules aren’t largely gone by the time a woman is 55, her risk of breast cancer triples. By looking closely at the structures in a large sample of benign tissues, the researchers were able to note standard measurements for lobule size and number of acini in the lobules.

This twofold approach led to development of accurate metrics on which to base individual risk. The team hopes this new model, combined with other patient information and assessments, will greatly improve a physician’s ability to predict cancer risk for individual patients.

More Women Opting to Remove Healthy Breast After Cancer Diagnosis

BUFFALO – The number of women going for surgery to remove the healthy breast after cancer diagnosis in one breast, according to a new study of New York State data.

And this was despite a lack of evidence that the surgery can improve survival.

The study also found that despite extensive press coverage of women who choose to have both breasts removed because of a strong family history of cancer, the rate of this surgery is relatively low and has changed little in the last decade.

Prophylactic mastectomy, the removal of a non-cancerous breast, is one method for reducing a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer.

But not much is known about the prevalence of prophylactic mastectomies for preventing breast cancer among high-risk women or on the prevalence of the surgery to prevent tumours in the healthy breast among women whose cancer is limited to one breast.

Led by Dr. Stephen B. Edge, at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, the researchers examined the frequency of prophylactic mastectomies in New York State between 1995 and 2005 using mandated state-wide hospital discharge data combined with data from the state cancer registry.

They identified 6,275 female New York residents who underwent prophylactic mastectomies.

It was found that 81 percent of the women had been diagnosed with cancer in one breast, while 19 percent had no personal history of breast cancer.

The researchers found that the number of prophylactic mastectomies increased during the time period, particularly among women with cancer in one breast.

Over the 11-year study period, the prevalence of these contralateral mastectomies more than doubled.

The prevalence of bilateral prophylactic mastectomies among women with no personal history of breast cancer increased only slightly.

“These data from New York are the only data on a large population of women that examine the use of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy,” said Edge.

“These data demonstrate that prophylactic mastectomy is an uncommon procedure that is performed most commonly on women with a personal history of breast cancer. Although the total number of prophylactic mastectomies performed per year was small, it appears that the use of the surgery is increasing,” he added.

He also advised that women with breast cancer should have careful counselling regarding benefits and risks before proceeding with prophylactic mastectomy of the other breast.

The study has been published in the journal Cancer.