Israeli researchers discovered a new genetic approach that may stop the spread of brain cancer.

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Brain metastases are the final, lethal consequence of many aggressive cancers, and researchers are racing to discover preventive measures.

A new Tel Aviv University study finds a known adjuvant — an ingredient used in some vaccines to strengthen the immune response —may be an effective means of preventing brain metastases in patients whose primary tumors have been removed. Continue reading

Study Finds a Strong Link between Cell Phone Use and Cancer

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The dangers of cell phone use have long been debated but for the first time a clear connection between cell phone use and higher risk of cancer has been established in a study by Tel Aviv University.

Scientists from TAU, Rabin Medical Center and the Technion examined the saliva content of 20 long-term heavy cell phone users, defined as a mean of 12 years of 30 hours per week of use. Continue reading

Repairing Our Inner Clock with a Two-Inch Fish

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Humans and zebra fish share mechanisms that regulate our circadian system, says TAU researcher

Circadian rhythms — the natural cycle that dictates our biological processes over a 24-hour day — does more than tell us when to sleep or wake. Disruptions in the cycle are also associated with depression, problems with weight control, jet lag and more. Now Prof. Yoav Gothilf of Tel Aviv University‘s Department of Neurobiology at the George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences is looking to the common zebrafish to learn more about how the human circadian system functions.

Prof. Gothilf  Continue reading

A New Drug Delivery System May be provided Using a Body’s Defense Mechanism

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Are our bodies vulnerable to some pollutants whose lack of solubility in water, or “hydrophobicity,” has always been thought to protect us from them? New Tel Aviv University research has discovered that this is indeed the case.

Studies by Dr. Michael Gozin of Tel Aviv University’s School of Chemistry at the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences and Dr. Dan Peer of TAU’s Laboratory of Nanomedicine in the Department of Cell Research and Immunology have revealed that mucus – the thick substance lining those internal bodily organs that come into contact with the outer environment, such as the respiratory system, the digestive system, and the female reproductive system – may instead play an active role in the penetration of hydrophobic substances, including toxins and carcinogens, into our cells. Continue reading